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COPYRIGHT DEPOSIT. 



Larkin 
Housewives' Cook Book 

Good Things to Eat 

and 
How to Prepare Them 

Five hundred and forty-eight recipes, of which 
four hundred and eighty are prize recipes 
selected from more than three thousand 
submitted by practical housekeepers in the 
Larkin Recipe Contests. Compiled especially 
for customers and friends of the Larkin Co. 
by the Larkin Kitchen. 

PRICE, 25 CENTS 



Published by 

Established, 1875 Pure Food Specialists 

BUFFALO CHICAGO PEORIA 

Local Branch: Philadelphia 

415 F. 4529-lS 



COPYRIGHTED, 1915 

BY LARKIN CO. 

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 



m 20 1915 
'CI,A401084 



fi^t 




To the woman who takes pride in 
serving tasty and attractive dishes, 
who delights in placing on her table 
"Good Things to Eat," who wishes to 
have the means of "variety" ever at her 
command, this Cook Book will be a valu- 
able and constant adviser. 

It is interesting to note that it contains 
recipes from the North, South, East and 
West; the favorite recipes of practical 
and e^xperienced housewives. No recipes 
were accepted from professional cooks 
but all from the homes of our many 
customers. We believe that this book 
will prove unique on account of the 
immense variety given. 

Here will be found an answer to the 
question that is ever perplexing the house- 
wife — what to serve for the coming meal. 
Here she will find most valuable sugges- 
tions that will enable her to prepare, in 
great variety and in a practical and 
economical way, delicious and appetizing 
dishes that will be a source of real satis- 
faction and extreme delight to those in 
her home who truly appreciate "Good 
Things to Eat." 




"Now, good digestion wait on appetite ^ 
And health on both!" 

— Shakespeare. 



CONTENTS 

Page 

How to Measure 6 

Weights and Measures 6 

Rules for Testing and Using Fat for Frying 7 

Soups 8 

Fish 14 

Meats and Poultry 19 

Vegetables 32 

Salads and Dressings 41 

Eggs 50 

Macaroni and Cheese Dishes 53 

Bread and Rolls 58 

Toast and Griddle-Cakes 66 

Cakes and Frostings 69 

Gingerbreads, Cookies and Doughnuts 84 

Desserts 89 

Pastry and Pies 100 

Meat and Fish Sauces 109 

Pudding Sauces Ill 

Pickles and Preserves 113 

Canned Fruits and Vegetables 118 

Jellies, Jams and Marmalades 120 

Beverages and Fruit Juices 124 

Candies 127 

Sandwiches 132 

Index 135 




Level Measurements Only Are Used In These Recipes 

Flour, meal, powdered sugar and soda should be sifted before 
measuring. A cupful is measured level ; do not shake down. 

A cup, as used in these recipes, holds one-half pint 
(two gills) of liquid, or one-half pound of granulated 
sugar or butter. A tin or glass measuring-cup, divided 
into quarters and thirds, can be purchased at any 
house-furnishing store for ten cents. 

To measure a level tablespoon or teaspoon, make smooth 
with a knife but do not pat down. 

A half spoonful is ' measured by cutting in half 
lengthwise ; a fourth spoonful by cutting a half spoon- 
ful crosswise a little nearer the handle of the spoon. 

A "pinch" is as much as you can hold between 
the first finger and thumb. 

A family scale is a great convenience, both for 
use in cooking and for weighing purchases. 





16 tablespoons equal 

3 teaspoons of liquid. . 

4 tablespoons of liquid 

2 gills 

2 cups 

4 " (2 pints) 

4 " of sifted flour. . . 

2 " " butter 

3^ cup " " 

2 cups 
23^ " 



granulated sugar, 
powdered sugar. . 
pint *' water or milk. . . 

" " solid fat 

tablespoons of coffee . . . . 
" butter. . . , 



sugar, 
flour . 



cup 

tablespoon 
gill or 34 cup 
cup 
pint 
quart 

quart or 1 pound 
pound 
J4 pound or 4 ounces 
pound 
pound 
pound 
pound 
ounce 
ounce 

ounce , 

ounce 




Rules for Testing and 
Using Fat for Frying 




To Test Fat for Frying 

1. Drop a piece of soft bread into the hot fat; if the bread 
browns in forty seconds, the temperature is right for any cooked 
mixture. 

2. Use the same test for uncooked mixtures, allowing one 
minute for bread to brown. Fresh fat or oil should be used for 
batter and dough mixtures. It can then be used for fish, meat 
and croquettes, but should be frequently clarified. 

To Clarify 

Melt fat, add raw potato cut in small pieces, heat the fat 
gradually ; when fat ceases to bubble and potatoes are well browned, 
strain through double cheese-cloth. The potato absorbs any 
odors or gases and collects some of the sediment. The remaining 
sediment will settle in the bottom of the pan. When you have 
only a small amount of fat to be clarified, add boiling water to the 
cold fat, stir vigorously and set aside to cool; the fat will float to 
the top and the sediment can be scraped from the bottom. 

To Try Out Fat 

Any odd pieces of fat may be tried out more easily in a double 
sauce-pan than by putting into the oven; it will then take less 
watching. 

Sauteing 

Saut^ing is frying in a small quantity of fat. In many cases 
the word saute might be used in this book but is not, as the word 
is not generally understood, so we have used the more common 
word "fry," which really means cooking in deep fat. All foods 
when fried should be drained on soft paper. 

Fricasseeing 

Fricasseeing is sauteing and cooking in a sauce. 

To Egg and Crumb 

Before frying, dip the mixture in bread-crumbs, then In the 
egg, then again in the crumbs. One tablespoon of cold water 
may be used with the egg to good advantage. 

To prepare the crumbs put stale bread, thoroughly dried out, 
through the food-chopper, using the fine or coarse cutter according 
to the kind of crumbs required. 




THE cheaper cuts of beef are best suited for the making of soup 
— the vein, neck, flank, cheek and shin. Though quite tough 
and sinewy they are full of nutriment and flavor. 

Water cannot dissolve the fiber of the beef, so we therefore 
always remove the beef from the soup and make it over into meat 
dishes. The bones from roasts or poultry, or part of the steak 
from dinner, should all be put into a kettle, covered with cold water 
and simmered until the goodness is cooked out. Never boil soup- 
meat of any kind, for boiling hardens the meat without drawing out 
the goodness. Be quite sure to have a lid that closely fits the soup 
kettle or much of the goodness and flavor will pass off in the steam. 

To Make Meat Soups 

Wipe meat with clean cloth wrung out of cold water. Cut the 
lean meat in small pieces. By doing so a larger amount of 
surface is exposed to the water and the juices are readily drawn 
out. Always cover soup-meat with cold water and bring slowly 
to the boiling-point. If a portion of the meat is browned before 
adding water, the soup will have a richer flavor. 

To Bind Soups 

Cream soups and purees (purees are soups with the vegetables 
strained out or forced through a sieve) if allowed to stand, will 
separate, unless bound together. To bind a soup melt some 
butter, add an equal amount of flour and when mixed add a 
small quantity of the soup; then add to the remainder of the 
soup. In this way lumps will be avoided. 

To Prevent Cream of Tomato Soup Curdling 

Put soda with the tomato, allowing one-fourth teaspoon soda to 
two cups of tomatoes, then add to the thickened milk, stirring 
all the time. If you wish to keep the soup hot for a while, 
leave it in the separate sauce-pans and do not add the soda 
until ready to serve. 

Croutons to Serve with Soup 

These are made by cutting stale bread into thin slices. Remove 
the crust, spread with butter and bake until crisp and brown, 
or brown in the frying pan. 

Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



SOUPS g 

Beef Broth with Vegetables 

Cook a beef bone with a little meat on it several hours in two 
quarts of water. When done, add one can of Larkin Tomatoes, 
three onions finely chopped, one pint chopped cabbage, one cup 
chopped potatoes, two tablespoons of Larkin Rice or Macaroni. 
Salt and pepper to season. Serve with oyster crackers. The 
vegetables are quickly chopped if put through Larkin Food- 
Chopper, jj L. NuzuM, Watson, W. Va. 

Mutton Broth 

Put two pounds neck of mutton on to boil in two quarts of cold 
water. Add one turnip, one head of celery, one leek and one 
carrot, all cut fine. Cook for one hour. Then add two potatoes 
cut in dice and one-half cup of noodles or macaroni ^and one- 
fourth can Larkin Tomatoes. ^^^ ^ leary. West Chester, Pa. 

A Quick Soup 

Take what is left of a roast that has a bone in it. Put it into 
a soup kettle, cover with cold water and simmer for one hour. 
Then add two tablespoons of Larkin Dehydro Soup Vegetables 
previously soaked in one-half cup of cold water for ten 
minutes. Add also four tablespoons of Larkin Rice and two 
potatoes cut in cubes. When nearly done, add one can of 
Larkin Tomato Soup, and salt and pepper to taste. Very good. 

Mrs. Stewart, Paterson, N. J. 

Pea Soup 

Put one tablespoon of butter and two tablespoons of flour into 
a sauce-pan; cook until brown. Add one can of Larkin Peas 
and one and one-half cups of hot water. Season to taste with 
salt, pepper and a teaspoon of sugar. Add a little freshly- 
, chopped parsley. Boil five minutes and serve. 

Mrs. E. Varga, Chicago, III. 

Lentil Soup 

Wash one cup of dry lentils. Cover with cold water and 
soak over night. In the morning drain and add one quart 
of stock or water, one small bay leaf, one small onion, one 
teaspoon Larkin Salt and one-fourth of a teaspoon Larkin 
Pepper. Stew slowly for about two hours until done, press 
through a colander, then through a sieve. Blend two table- 
spoons butter and two of Larkin Flour, add to the soup, stir until 
boiling. Add one tablespoon of chopped parsley and serve. 

Larkin Kitchen. 

Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



10 



SOUPS 



Bean Soup 

Soak one pint of white beans over night. In the morning 
drain and cover with boiling water. When boiling add a pinch 
of Larkin Baking Soda, cook fifteen minutes. Drain again, 
add fresh water and simmer until tender. Pass through a 
colander, return to kettle, add Larkin Celery Salt and White 
Pepper to taste. Melt four tablespoons of Larkin Peanut 
Butter in hot water, add to the soup just before serving, also 
two tablespoons grated horseradish or one-half cup Larkin 
Chili Sauce. Serve hot. ^^^ ^ ^ Parsons. Lyons, N. Y. 

Marrow Bean Soup 

When boiling beans for dinner save the water and use with 
left-over beans for soup. Put beans with the water through 
colander, allow one quart of milk to every pint of beans. Add 
salt, pepper and butter. This makes a delicious and also a 
nourishing soup. ^^^ ^ L. Markle. Lawton. Mich. 

Pork and Bean Soup 

Empty the contents of one can of Larkin Pork and Beans into a 
sauce-pan. Add one quart of boiling water, one small onion 
cut fine, one small bay leaf and a dash of cayenne pepper. 
Simmer one-half hour, then strain. Cook two tablespoons 
butter and two of flour, to a light brown. Gradually add a 
little of the soup until you have a smooth paste. Then add 
to the soup and cook five minutes. Serve at once with a few 
croutons in each plate. ^^^ ^ Leighton. Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Potato Soup 

Peel one quart of potatoes and cut in dice, also one medium- 
sized onion. Put into kettle and cover with water. When 
tender add one cup of cream, pepper and salt and Larkin Celery 
Salt to season. Melt some butter in a frying-pan and brown 
one cup of bread-crumbs in this, to serve with the soup. Delicious. 

Mrs. W. R. Treon, Turbotville, Pa. 

Old-Fashioned Potato Soup 

Take four good-sized potatoes, cut into dice; also two small 
onions finely chopped; add salt, pepper, celery salt and a small 
piece of bacon or a little butter. Cover with a quart of water. 
Cook slowly for one hour. Blend two tablespoons flour with 
one cup of milk. Add to the hot soup, stir until it comes to 
a boil. Cook for a few minutes. This is very good and will 
serve four people. ^^^ ^ Croman, Marion, Ohio. 

Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



SOUPS 



11 



Cream of Potato Soup 

Peel and cut into dice four large white potatoes and cover with 
boiling water. Cut up three medium-sized onions, fry to a 
golden brown in butter and add to the potatoes. When pota- 
toes are quite soft, mash through a sieve using water and all. 
Add one pint of milk and two tablespoons each of butter and flour 
blended (the soup should be the consistency of good cream) ; add 
Larkin Salt, White Pepper and Celery Salt; also a few drops of 
onion extract and serve at once. miss M. May, Darby, Pa. 

Cream of Peanut Soup 

Put one quart of milk into a double-boiler, then one small bay 
leaf, and one-half cup of Larkin Peanut Butter. Moisten three 
tablespoons Larkin Bread Flour in a little cold milk, add to 
hot milk and stir until thickened. Cook five minutes. Add 
one-half teaspoon each of Larkin Onion Extract and Celery 
Salt, and a little white pepper. Crisp Larkin Saltines in the 
oven to serve with this soup. mrs. H. Wrench, Goodrich, Wis. 

Cream of Corn Soup 

Put one can of Larkin Corn into a sauce-pan with one pint of 
hot water and a slice of onion. Simmer for twenty minutes, 
rub through a sieve and add one pint of milk. Blend together 
three tablespoons flour with three of butter. Add the hot 
soup gradually so it will not be lumpy. Stir until thickened. 
Add salt and pepper. Serve at once. Larkin Kitchen. 

Tomato Soup 

Cook together for twenty minutes, one can tomatoes, one pint 
water, twelve peppercorns, four cloves, two teaspoons sugar, 
small piece of bay leaf, and one small onion cut in slices. Strain 
and add one teaspoon salt, and one-eighth teaspoon soda. 
Melt two tablespoons butter, add three tablespoons flour, when 
thoroughly mixed add strained liquid, boil three minutes and 
it is ready to serve. If desired, one quart of milk may be 
scalded and added just before serving; you will then have 
Cream of Tomato Soup. Miss:Bessie Renfrew, Lenox, Mass. 

Tomato Bouillon 

Heat the contents of one can of Larkin Tomatoes to boiling point. 
Strain through a fine sieve. Add one-half teaspoon soda, one 
teaspoon salt, one pint of hot water and two Larkin Bouillon 
Cubes. Bring to a boil and it is ready to serve. It is exceed- 
ingly good and just the thing for a luncheon dish or when 
serving a heavy dinner. Serve with crackers. 

Mrs. B. Rayburn Tate, Moberly, Mo. 
Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



12 



SOUPS 



Tomato Soup with Macaroni 

Put one cup of Larkin Short-Cut Macaroni to cook in one quart 
of boiling salted water. Cook about twenty minutes or until 
tender. Be careful it does not settle to bottom and scorch. 
When cooked add one-half can tomatoes and bring to a boil, 
add a pinch of soda, a generous piece of butter and one pint of 
rich milk. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Serve very 
hot. Frances C. Argetsinger, Van Etten, N. Y. 

Vegetable Chowder 

Put through Larkin Food-Chopper (using coarse cutter) one 
beet, two onions, two carrots, two parsnips, all medium-size; 
also four large potatoes, and one quart of fresh or canned 
tomatoes. Add two quarts boiling water, cook gently one 
hour, then add one tablespoon salt, one-half teaspoon pepper, 
two tablespoons granulated sugar, cook for thirty minutes 
longer and it is ready to serve. Sufficient for six people. 

Mrs. F. a. Hough, Worcester, Mass. 

Corn Chowder 

Chop fine, one-half cup or one-fourth pound of salt pork. Put into 
frying pan to try out. Then add to the fat, one thinly-sliced 
onion. Turn into a soup kettle. Add one can of Larkin Corn 
and three pints of milk. Thicken with diluted flour. Add pepper 
and salt. Place a Larkin Soda Cracker in each plate, pour the 
soup over it and serve. mrs. H. F. Smith, Morrisville, Vt. 

Clam Chowder 

Chop fine four potatoes, one large onion, four tomatoes, and 
one carrot and boil in two quarts of water; when nearly done 
add twenty-five clams, finely chopped, four tablespoons of 
butter and salt and pepper to taste. 

Mrs. Harry C. Smith, Trenton, N. J. 

Imperial Fish Chowder 

Take two pounds of halibut or fresh codfish. Wash, remove 
the skin and bones, and chop coarsely. Also chop one pound 
of salt pork or Larkin Bacon, six medium-sized potatoes, two 
large onions, six fresh tomatoes or one-half can. Put all in a 
soup kettle, season with salt and pepper and pour over boiling 
water to almost cover. Simmer one hour or more over a 
moderate fire; do not stir. Rub together three tablespoons of 
butter with two of flour, heat a quart of milk and gradually 
add to the flour. Put a pinch of soda into the chowder, add 
the thickened milk, bring to a boil and serve at once. 

Mrs. W. H. Bliss, Shrewsbury, Mass. 

Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



SOUPS 



13 



Salmon Chowder 

Put one can of Larkin Red Salmon into a sauce-pan with one 
quart of milk. When hot add one teaspoon salt, a little white 
pepper and two tablespoons Larkin Cracker Meal. If Cream 
Soup is preferred strain through a sieve, put a teaspoon of 
whipped cream in center of each plate, and serve at once. Will 



serve five people. 



Mrs. S. D. Cook, Lansing, Mich. 



Oyster Soup 

Put one quart of oysters into colander and drain away liquid. 
Pick over to remove shells, pour over them one quart of cold 
water. Bring one quart of milk to scalding point, thicken with 
two tablespoons butter blended with two tablespoons flour. 
Then add oysters and liquor, one teaspoon salt and one-fourth 
teaspoon pepper; bring to a boil and serve at once. Do not 
allow soup to boil or the oysters will become hard. 

Larkin Kitchen. 

Cream of Clam Soup 

One pint or twenty-five small clams, three cups of milk, one- 
half teaspoon Larkin Onion Extract, three tablespoons butter, 
three tablespoons flour, pepper and salt. 

Pick over the clams and chop fine; put them with the liquor 
into a sauce-pan and bring to the boiling point. Melt the butter, 
add the flour, then the milk. Cook for a few minutes; add salt 
and pepper. Add milk to the clams, reheat and serve at once 
in individual soup plates, or in bouillon cups, with a spoon of 
whipped cream in each. Sprinkle a little fresh chopped parsley 
over the cream ; add a dash of paprika, and a charming luncheon 
dish IS the result. ^^^ ^ g Gracia, New Bedford, Mass. 





To Boil Fish 

Wash the fish well in cold water, wipe carefully and rub with 
salt; wrap in a cloth, drop into a pan of boiling water; add a 
slice of onion, a bay leaf and one teaspoon of salt. Cover and 
simmer gently, allowing ten minutes to a pound, lift out care- 
fully, drain, unfasten the cloth, garnish with parsley and lemon 
and serve with plain drawn butter or fish sauce. 

Larkin Kitchen. 

To Fry Fish 

Wash and dry fish thoroughly. Dip in seasoned flour, then in 
egg and bread-crumbs. Fry in deep fat, drain on soft paper. 



Serve with sauce. 



Larkin Kitchen. 



Broiled Fish 

Wash and split open a firm white fish and remove the bone. 
Spread with soft butter, dredge lightly with flour and season 
with pepper and salt. Place fish on a buttered pan or fish 
sheet and cook under the gas flame or over the open fire. The 
time required depends upon the thickness of the fish. With 
a Larkin Spatula remove from pan to hot platter. Garnish 
with slices of lemon and sprigs of parsley. Serve very hot. 

Larkin Kitchen. 

Planked Fish 

Prepare fish as for broiling. Lay onto a buttered fish plank, 
skin side down. Bake in hot oven, or in broiling oven if a 
gas stove is used, for ten or fifteen minutes. If the fish is a 
thick one it is best to heat the plank before using and bake 
in a moderate oven. Surround fish with a thick border of 
well-seasoned mashed potatoes and bake until potatoes are 
slightly brown. Garnish with lemon and parsley. Serve hot. 

Larkin Kitchen. 



Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



FISH 



15 



Baked Fish 

Scale, clean, and wash the fish. Wipe it dry and fill with a 

stuffing made of one cup of mashed potatoes, one cup of stale 

bread-crumbs, seasoned with Larkin Pepper, Salt, chopped 

parsley and a tablespoon of butter. Sew up with a strong 

thread. Lay it in a baking-pan, put a tablespoon of butter 

or pork fat on top and dredge with flour. Add one-half cup 

of water. Put into Larkin Savory Roaster and bake in a 

moderate oven one hour or until the flesh readily separates 

from the bone. Serve hot. ,, t^ t ,^r ^ ^ 

Mrs. D. Leary, West Chester, Pa. 

Baked Shad with Tomatoes 

Clean the fish. Brown one cup of bread-crumbs in butter, fill 

shad and sew up. Grease a baking-pan with butter. Take 

three pieces of Larkin Bacon, lay over shad, sprinkle with salt 

and pepper, baste with three tablespoons of Larkin Canned 

Tomatoes and three tablespoons of water. Bake one-half hour 

or longer, according to size. ht /- a tt 

^ ** Mrs. C. Adams, Harrisburg, Pa. 

Codfish Balls 

Prepare one-half package or one generous cup of Larkin Pure 
Codfish as directed. Put into a sauce-pan with two raw pota- 
toes cut into dice, cover with boiling water and bring slowly 
to boiling point. Cook for ten minutes, drain thoroughly and 
mash fine with wire potato-masher. Add one egg (unbeaten), 
pepper and salt if needed. Form into tiny balls with a spoon. 
Fry in hot fat. They are cooked when brown. Serve with 
egg sauce. This quantity will serve five people. 

Mrs. Martin Burns, Schenectady, N. Y. 

Codfish Lo£if 

Soak one-half package of Larkin Pure Codfish in cold water 
three hours before using. Put into a sauce-pan with one and 
a half cups of diced raw potatoes. Simmer twenty minutes, 
drain off the water and beat light with a wire potato-masher. 
Melt three tablespoons of cooking fat or butter in a frying-pan. 
Add one and a half cups of onions (about four onions) sliced 
quite fine. Cook until brown. Add to the Codfish in the 
sauce-pan, mix together with two teaspoons of lemon juice, one 
teaspoon of Larkin Dry Mustard, a little pepper, salt if needed. 
Put into buttered Larkin Casserole and bake in hot oven twenty 
minutes. Serve with cream or egg sauce. These quantities 
will serve five people. Mrs. V. Zook, Nevada, Ohio. 

Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



16 



FISH 



Creamed Codfish 

Prepare one-half package of Larkin Pure Codfish as directed 
and cook for fifteen minutes. Make a cream sauce by melting 
two tablespoons butter, add two of flour and one cup of milk, 
season with salt and pepper. The beaten yolk of one egg may 
be used in the sauce if desired. Stir in the codfish and serve 
on toast. Sufficient to serve five people, 

Mrs. H. D. Clark, Clark's Summit, Pa. 

Codfish Fritters 

Cut Larkin Pure Codfish into strips about the size of a finger. 
Freshen by soaking several hours in cold water. When needed, 
dry between the folds of a soft towel and dip each piece in a 
batter made by sifting together one cup of Larkin Flour, one 
teaspoon Larkin Baking Powder, one-half teaspoon salt and a 
few grains of pepper. Beat one egg quite light, add three- 
fourths of a cup of milk; gradually add to the flour, be sure to 
mix quite smooth. Fry a delicate brown in hot fat. Serve 
at once. Mrs, Hutter, Rochester, N. Y. 

Baked Salmon Loaf 

One can of Larkin Red Alaska Salmon, four tablespoons of 
bread-crumbs, four tablespoons butter, pepper and salt to taste. 
Add one egg slightly beaten. Mix thoroughly and bake in 
loaf with three slices of Larkin Bacon across the top. Serve 
with creamed onions. mrs. E. A. Ross, Springfield, Mass. 

Salmon Loaf 

Mix together one can of Larkin Red Salmon, one cup of milk, 
one-half cup of cracker-crumbs, one egg slightly beaten, salt 
and pepper to taste. Bake in a bread-pan half an hour, turn 
out on a platter and pour around the loaf one pint of seasoned 
cream sauce to which you have added one cup of Larkin Green 
Peas, This loaf may be steamed one hour instead of baked if 
preferred. Mrs. J. Knowlden, Hinsdale, N. Y. 

Salmon Souffle 

Flake one can of Larkin Salmon, add one cup of bread- or 
cracker-crumbs soaked in two cups of milk. Season with salt, 
pepper, and the juice of one lemon. Then add the lightly- 
beaten yolks of three eggs. Fold in last the stiffly-beaten 
whites. Bake in a moderate oven twenty-five minutes. Serve 
with creamed potatoes. mrs. Emma G. Burrows, Amherst, Mass. 

Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



FISH 



17 



Salmon Croquettes 

Mix one can of Larkin Salmon with one cup brown bread-' 
crumbs, one cup of mashed potatoes, one-half teaspoon Larkin 
Salt, a little pepper, one egg slightly beaten and one tablespoon 
of melted butter. Form in croquettes and roll in bread-crumbs; 
then egg and crumbs again. Fry in hot fat. 

Daisy E. Light, Martinsburg, W. Va.' 

Creamed Oysters 

Make a cream sauce by melting two tablespoons butter, add 
two tablespoons flour, stir in gradually one cup of milk; stir 
until boiling. Add one teaspoon salt and one-eighth teaspoon 
pepper. The beaten yolk of one egg may be added if liked. 
Scald twenty-five oysters in their own juice and add to cream 
sauce. Serve at once on buttered toast. 

Anna B. Bond, Woodensburg, Md. 

Oysters au Gratin 

Put two tablespoons butter into a sauce-pan. When melted add 
two tablespoons flour, and one cup of milk and stir until it 
thickens. When cooked, season with one-half teaspoon salt, 
a little pepper and one teaspoon of chopped parsley. Butter a 
baking dish. Put in a layer of sauce, then a layer of Larkin 
Cove Oysters. Sprinkle with salt and pepper, add more sauce 
and so on until all is used. Cover top with bread-crumbs or 
Larkin Cracker Meal. Dot thickly with butter and bake in a 
quick oven twenty-five minutes. Four tablespoons of grated 
cheese added to the sauce improves the flavor for some people. 

Mrs. J. A. Henry, Strawberry Point, Iowa. 

Fried Oysters 

Put the oysters into a colander to drain; with the fingers place 
each one on a dry soft towel to absorb the moisture. Season 
with salt and pepper. Beat one egg; add one tablespoon cold 
water. Dip each oyster in the egg, then in stale bread- or 
cracker-crumbs or Larkin Cracker Meal. Fry in deep fat. 
Drain on soft paper. Serve on toast. Pass lemon with the 
oysters. Mrs. Jno. Lattimore, Claysville, Pa. 

Little Pigs in Blankets 

Choose large plump oysters and wrap a thin slice of Larkin 
Bacon around each one pinning it with a tooth pick. Put 
them into a heated frying-pan and cook until the bacon is crisp. 
Serve at once. Mrs Fanny Young, Albion, Mich. 

Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



18 



FISH 



Shrimp in Reimekins 

Melt four tablespoons of butter; add four tablespoons of Larkin 
Flour and when bubbling stir in one and one-half cups of milk. 
Season to taste with Larkin Salt and Pepper. Add two cans 
of Larkin Shrimp and one can of Larkin Canned Peas. Rinse 
both Shrimp and Peas with cold water, then drain. Fill either 
buttered ramekins or scallop sheels with the mixture or place 
in a Larkin Casserole. Sprinkle with buttered bread-crumbs 
and bake twenty minutes in a moderate oven. If prepared in 
chafing dish, serve on buttered toast. 

Mrs. J. R. Abercrombie, St. Joseph, Mo. 

Lobster Wiggle 

Melt three tablespoons of butter, add three tablespoons of 
flour. When bubbling, gradually add two cups of milk or 
cream, stir until thickened. Add one cup of Larkin Canned 
Lobster broken into small pieces, one cup of Larkin Peas drained 
from liquor, one-half teaspoon Larkin Salt and one-eighth 
teaspoon pepper. Serve on buttered toast. Cold, cooked 
chicken or shrimps may be used in the same way. Shreds of 
green pepper may be used in place of peas. 

Mrs. E. a. Benham, Saratoga Springs, N. Y. 

Clam Pie 

Put one pint of clams or one can of Larkin Canned Clams 
through a food-chopper. With the liquor mix one tablespoon 
of Larkin Flour diluted with a little cold water, and add to 
clams. Season with salt and pepper. Line a deep pie-plate 
with pastry, pour in clams, and put on a top crust. Dot small 
pieces of butter over top crust and bake in a hot oven about 
twenty mmutes. Mrs. Carl Southworth, Bridgewater, Mass. 





To Pan Broil Steak 

Have the steak" a little more than one inch thick. Make an 

iron pan very hot, rub it quickly with suet, then put in the 

steak. Never put the fork into the lean meat, always in the 

fat. Just as soon as one side is seared, turn over; turn several 

times in cooking; add pepper and salt; serve on a hot dish at 

once. J „ 

Larkin Kitchen. 

To Broil Steak 

See that the fire is bright and clear, put the steak on the grid- 
iron, turn often and allow time according to the thickness of 
steak; dust with pepper and salt and serve very hot. Steak 
to be good should never stand after being cooked. 

Larkin Kitchen. 

To Broil with Gas 

Light the gas in the oven at least five minutes before you wish 

to use it. Take out the rack or the meat will stick to the 

bars if very hot; leave in the lower pan. Put the steak on the 

rack as near the flame as you can without the flame touching. 

As soon as the steak is thoroughly seared, turn the meat over; 

be careful not to put the fork into the lean of the meat as that 

allows the juices to escape; turn once more and season liberally 

with salt and pepper. Drain off some of the fat in broiling 

pan and pour the remainder with the sediment over the steak. 

Serve at once. , t^ 

Larkin Kitchen. 

Pot Roast 

Take four pounds of beef from the shoulder. Put half a cup 

of good drippings in an iron kettle, make hot and sear beef 

on each side; when well browned set back where it will cook 

slowly for two hours; after the first hour add salt and pepper, 

a piece of celery, carrot, onion and bay leaf if liked; if cooked 

slowly no water will be needed. Pour off some of the fat and 

make gravy as for roast beef. , y, 

* ■' Larkin Kitchen. 



Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



20 



MEATS AND POULTRY 



Roast Beef 

Wipe meat with damp cloth, place in baking pan bone side 
down, dust lightly with pepper; if there is no fat with meat, cut 
up a piece of suet and place around beef. The oven must be 
very hot. After first twenty minutes, cool ofif oven a little, add 
salt. Allow fifteen minutes to the pound for cooking and, unless 
a covered roaster is used, baste every ten minutes. To make 
gravy, lift out beef, pour off fat, scrape together all brown 
sediment from around pan, allow two tablespoons flour to two 
of fat, mix well ; then add hastily one pint of water or stock, boil 
up well, add salt and pepper, strain and serve. l^rkin Kitchen. 

Swiss Steak 

Have two pounds of round steak cut one inch thick. Melt 
two tablespoons of fat (suet will do) in a frying pan, season 
steak with salt and pepper, dredge with flour, brown quickly on 
both sides then put into a Larkin Casserole. Brown a scant 
half cup flour in fat l^ft in pan, add three cups hot water, pour 
over the meat. Cook for two hours in a slow oven. If onion is 
liked, flavor with Larkin Onion Extract, or cook a raw onion in 
the fat before the meat is browned. The toughest meat will 
become tender and delicious, cooked in this way. 

Mrs. D. H. Dager, LaFayette Hill, Pa. 

Spanish Steak 

Two pounds top round steak cut about two inches thick, leave 
on the fat. Brown in hot frying pan, then add three-fourths 
cup boiling water, cover and bake forty-five minutes in moder- 
ate oven. Sprinkle with salt and pepper; cover with layer sliced 
seasoned onions. Bake another hour. Then cover with layer 
of the solid meat of a can of Larkin Tomatoes. Bake again 
fifteen minutes. Sprinkle over top two tablespoons grated 
cheese; place in oven long enough for cheese to melt. There 
will be a delicious thick gravy and the steak will be very tender. 

Mrs. M. C. Durkin, Shamokin, Pa. 

Hamburg Steak with Tomato Sauce 

Put one and a half pounds of round steak through the food- 
chopper, add one or two eggs, one cup of Larkin Cracker Meal 
or stale bread-crumbs, salt and pepper, one small onion finely 
chopped, water or milk to moisten; mix thoroughly. Form into 
small cakes. Cook slowly in a small quantity of hot fat. 
When steak is cooked, empty one can of Larkin Tomato Soup 
in frying pan, when boiling pour over steak and serv^e at once. 

Mrs. E. E. Nohl, Canton, Ohio. 
Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



MEATS AND POULTRY 



21 



English Beef Steak Pudding 

Sift three cups of Larkin Flour with two teaspoons of Larkin 
Baking Powder and one teaspoon salt. Chop one-quarter 
pound, or one-half cup of suet, quite fine, mix with flour, add 
enough cold water to make a stiff dough. Roll out and line 
a bowl with it. Cut up one pound of round steak in one-inch 
pieces, season with pepper and salt, and roll in a little flour. 
When bowl is half full of meat pour in one-half cup of water, 
add the rest of meat. Trim off crust and roll out a lid to fit 
on the top. Pinch the edges together, dip a cloth into boiling 
water, then in flour so it won't stick, cover over pudding, tie 
down and boil or steam for two and one-half hours. This may 
be boiled in a cloth but is not so good. Turn out to serve. 

Mrs. H. M. Roth, Albany, N. Y. 

Family Meat Loaf 

Put one and a half pounds of round steak through food-chopper, 

also one onion. Soak stale bread in cold water (about one cup) 

squeeze out with the hands, add to beef, season with salt, pepper 

and celery salt; mix thoroughly. Five hard-cooked eggs may 

be used with this when they are cheap. Put a layer of the 

prepared meat in a bread pan, then a layer of the sliced eggs, 

meat and so on, having meat last. Turn into a dripping pan 

or covered roaster. Bake for one hour. ^ 

Contributed. 

Beef Locif with Pimentos 

Put two pounds of round steak through meat-chopper, also 
three Larkin Pimentos (Spanish red peppers) and three Larkin 
Soda Crackers. Cook one-half cup of Larkin Rice in boiling 
water for ten or fifteen minutes, add pepper, salt, meat and 
one egg. Mix very thoroughly together and bake in covered 
roaster forty-five minutes, or steam in Larkin Steam Cooker 
for one hour. j^^^ ^ Lewis, Fostoria, Ohio. 

Jellied Beef Loaf 

Buy a soup bone with some meat on it (shank is the best), put in 
soup kettle, cover with cold water, add one onion, one carrot 
and a small bay leaf and simmer gently for several hours or 
until the meat will fall from the bone. When it is done, put a 
little of the liquor in a saucer to chill. If it does not "jell" 
add enough Larkin Gelatine to stifTen, season with pepper and 
salt. Pour in molds rinsed with cold water. The meat may 
be put through the meat grinder if preferred. 

Mrs. F. L. Faecher, Augusta, Kans. 

Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6, 



22 



MEATS AND POULTRY 



Jellied Veal or Chicken 

Cook in the same manner as Jellied Beef. Remove the bones, 
season and use sufficient Larkin Gelatine to stiffen. Directions 
come with each package. Larkin Kitchen. 

Beef Stew 

Two pounds of beef, two tablespoons flour, one small carrot, 
one pint water, two teaspoons salt, one-fourth teaspoon pepper, 
two tablespoons suet or drippings, one onion. Cut meat into 
small pieces, roll in flour, put drippings into pan, shake until 
smoking hot, then put in meat and sear on every side, add boil- 
ing water. Stir until boiling. Add all the seasonings, cover 
the pan and simmer for one and one-half hours, or place in a 
fireless cooker for three hours. Serve with dumplings. 

Mrs. J. B. Bonneau, Chicago, III. 

Egg Dumplings 

Sift two cups Larkin Flour with two teaspoons Larkin Baking 
Powder, one-half teaspoon Larkin Salt. Beat one egg light; 
add one-half cup of water; mix with flour, using spatula. Have 
broth boiling; drop in dumplings with a teaspoon; let them rest 
on the meat; cover tight and boil gently for twenty minutes 
without lifting the cover. If you follow this rule, you will 
have the lightest and tenderest dumplings you ever ate. 

Mrs. Thomas Morgan, Pittston, Pa. 

Potato Dumplings 

Pare three medium-sized potatoes and boil until tender. Put 
through potato ricer or mash quite fine. Add to them one 
cup flour, one teaspoon salt, one egg lightly beaten. Handle 
as little as possible, roll out and cut in six squares. In the center 
of each put some bread-crumbs which have been crisped brown 
in the oven (a little minced onion is very good, added to the 
crumbs). Roll up the squares of dough around the stuffing, 
make into ball shape, drop into boiling water or broth and 
boil steadily for twenty minutes. Do not remove lid while 
cooking. These may also be steamed. 

Mrs. William Starke, Methuen, Mass. 
Nut Steak without Meat 

Put into a mixing bowl one cup of walnut meats coarsely 
chopped, two cups of bread-crumbs, one-half teaspoon each of 
salt and dried sage, and a very little pepper. Mix dry ingre- 
dients together, add one egg slightly beaten and four table- 
spoons of milk. Shape as you would Hamburg Steak and 
saut6 in hot frying pan with a small amount of fat. Serve 
with tomato sauce. Mrs. J. F. Hillman, Trenton, N. ;j. 

Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



MEATS AND POULTRY 



23 



Beef Fritters 

Put one pound of round steak through a Larkin Food-Chopper. 
Season with pepper and salt, then add one can of Larkin Corn, 
one cup of bread- or cracker-crumbs and two eggs sHghtly 
beaten. Cook the same as pork sausage in a hot frying pan. 

Miss Orril Newland, Hoopeston, III. 

American Chop Suey 

Cook one-half package of Larkin Short-Cut Macaroni in boiling 
salted water for twenty minutes. While this is cooking put 
two onions and one-half pound of round steak through a Larkin 
Food-Chopper. Brown in a hot pan with a piece of butter or 
beef drippings. Drain water from macaroni, add one can of 
Larkin Tomatoes, season with Larkin Salt and Pepper, then 
add steak and onions and cook slowly for thirty minutes. 
Serve piping hot. This is sufficient for six persons. 

Mrs. Jno. Pierce, Lonsdale, R. I. 

Chili Con Carni ^ 

Put one pound each of veal and beef, also one large onion, 
through a Larkin Food-Chopper. Cover with water and 
simmer one and one-half hours. When almost cooked add 
one cup boiled Larkin Short-Cut Macaroni, one can Larkin 
Tomatoes and one can of Larkin Peas. Season with salt 
and red pepper. Will serve nine people. 

Mrs. H. H. Bentheimer, Green Bay, Wis. 

Roast Pork 

Wipe pork with a damp cloth, sprinkle with pepper, salt and flour. 

Put into covered roaster, leave off the cover first thirty minutes, 

then cover closely. Allow twenty minutes for each pound. Bake 

in a moderate oven. Make gravy as for beef. Apples, with 

the cores removed, may be placed around the pork to bake. 

This gives the pork an excellent flavor. 

Larkin Kitchen. 

Baked Pork Chops 

Pare seven good-sized potatoes, slice as for scalloped potatoes. 
Take one and a quarter pounds of lean pork chops (loin pre- 
ferred), put a layer of potatoes into a Larkin Casserole or Bak- 
ing Dish, then a layer of pork chops, dust with salt and pepper, 
sprinkle with chopped onion, continue until all is used. Have 
potatoes on top. Pour in one cup of water or milk. Put on 
the cover and bake in moderately hot oven for one hour and 
forty minutes; uncover during the last ten minutes so potatoes 
will brown. Serve direct from the Casserole. Delicious. 

Mrs, Wm. Hess, St. Louis, Mo. 

Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



24 



MEATS AND POULTRY 



Apple Fritters 

Sift three times, one cup Larkin Pastry Flour, with three table- 
spoons sugar, one teaspoon Larkin Cream of Tartar Baking 
Powder, one-fourth teaspoon Larkin Salt; add one well-beaten 
egg, one-third cup milk and two tart apples, pared, cored and 
sliced. Drop into deep fat and fry until brown. Drain and 
sprinkle with sugar. The apples may be coarsely chopped and 
stirred into batter if preferred. Serve with roast pork. 

Mrs. a. E. Henderson, Twin Falls, Idaho. 

Larkin Sauerkraut 

Put into a kettle one quart of Larkin Sauerkraut, one pound 
of fresh pork, two onions put through Larkin Food-Chopper 
and water enough to cover. Cook slowly three hours. The 
longer it is cooked the better, but it should be cooked almost 
dry when done. jyjj^g rqy S. Heatwole, Harrisonburg, Va. 

Salt Pork with Cream Gravy 

Cut required amount of pork in moderately thin slices. Place 
in spider and cover with boiling water, cook a few minutes, take 
out and dip each piece in milk, then in flour. Put a few spoons 
of pork fat in spider and fry the pork until brown. Dish on a 
hot platter. Stir two tablespoons of flour into the fat, add 
pepper and salt if needed, add to this one pint of milk, stirring 
until gravy thickens. Pour gravy over pork and serve with 
baked potatoes. Delicious. j^^^^ ^ Wrench, Goodrich, Wis. 

Boiled Ham 

Soak ham several hours or over night in cold water to cover. 
Wash thoroughly, put into a kettle, cover with cold water, heat 
to boiling point and cook slowly until tender, allowing twenty 
minutes to the pound. Remove from range and set aside so 
that ham may partially cool; then take from water, remove 
outside skin, sprinkle with fine brown cracker-crumbs and stick 
with cloves one-half inch apart. Or it may be covered with 
brown sugar and baked in the oven until brown. Cabbage and 
potatoes may be cooked in the water in which the ham is boiled 
and served with the ham as a boiled dinner. larkin Kitchen. 

When Frying Ham 

Slice and fry in usual way. Then over fried meat pour hot 
water and immediately pour off again. This freshens the ham 
and leaves it tender and delicious. Use the water, which is 
rich in meat flavor, to make the gravy. Larkin Bacon may be 
cooked in the same way. ^^^^ Charlotte Bird, Ann Arbor, Mich. 



Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



MEATS AND POULTRY 25 

Deviled Ham and Eggs 

Put bits of ham through a Larkin Food-Chopper. For one cup 
of ham, put into a frying pan one tablespoon of butter, add one 
tablespoon of Larkin Flour, one teaspoon of vinegar, Larkin 
Pepper, and a fourth of a teaspoon Larkin Mustard and one-half 
cup of water. Let it boil, then put in the minced ham. Stir 
until very hot, turn into a pie dish or casserole and break on the 
surface five raw eggs. Put in the oven and bake five minutes 
or just long enough to set the eggs. Serve in baking dish. 

Mrs. C. Flinn, North Terre Haute, Ind. 

Pork Sausage 

Chop very fine one pound or two cups of cold cooked pork, 
moisten a slice of stale bread in half a cup of water, add to it 
the pork and three or four tablespoons of mashed potatoes, and 
one beaten egg, season with salt, pepper and sage. Mix well 
and shape into small flat cakes with the hands; dust lightly 
with flour or rolled cracker-crumbs, and saute in a little hot fat. 

Mrs. Sidney R. Lodder, Syracuse, N. Y. 
Good Sausage Meat 

When making pork sausage use one-third fat and two-thirds 
lean. Put through food-chopper and, to every twelve pounds 
of pork, take twelve teaspoons salt, six teaspoons pepper, nine 
teaspoons sifted sage. Mix well with the hands and put through 
the food-chopper again. Keep in a cool, dry place. 

Mrs. E. Thomas, Bristol, Conn. 
Pork Sausage with Tomatoes 

Separate one pound of link sausage, pierce each sausage several 
times with a fork. Place in hot frying pan. Cook until brown. 
Add one-half can of Larkin Tomatoes and one cup of water; 
also one tablespoon each of onion and parsley finely chopped. 
Add pepper and salt. Cook twenty minutes. The gravy may 
be thickened if preferred. Sufficient for six people. 

Mrs. George Clansz, Pearl River, N. Y. 

Sausage Rolls 

Make pastry as for pie-crust, using one and a half cups of 
Larkin Pastry Flour, one-half cup Larkin Pure Lard and one- 
half teaspoon Larkin Salt. Mix with cold water. Roll out 
and cut in small squares. Put one piece of Larkin Luncheon 
Sausage on each square, and pinch the edges together. One can 
of sausage makes eight of these rolls. Brush over with white 
of egg and bake in a hot oven. Very delicious for lunch when 
serving Club-of-Ten. Fresh pork sausage may be used if it is 
either parboiled or baked in the oven before using. 

Mrs. H. Wrench, Goodrich, Wis. 

Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



26 



MEATS AND POULTRY 



To Cure Hams, Bacon and Dried Beef 

For every twenty pounds of meat use three-fourths of a pound 
of Larkin Salt, one-half ounce saltpeter, and one cup Larkin 
Molasses, mixed thoroughly. Rub meat with mixture, keep 
it in the brine for three days, skin side down, repeat rubbing 
process until it has been done three times. Put in the smoke for 
three days after last rubbing. mrs. Edw. Thomas, Bristol, Conn. 

Roast Veal 

The leg and loin are most suitable for roasting. Wipe meat 
with a damp cloth, sprinkle lightly with Larkin Salt and Pepper, 
dredge with flour. Place slices of salt pork over and around meat. 
Veal is best cooked in covered roaster. If cooked in an open 
pan, baste often. Make gravy as for beef. Larkin Kitchen. 

Veal Locif 

Put one and one-half pounds of veal through the food-chopper 
with one-half pound of salt pork, also eight Larkin Soda Crackers 
and two or three sprigs of parsley. Add Larkin Pepper, Salt 
and two tablespoons lemon juice, also two eggs slightly beaten. 
Bake in a greased bread-pan one hour in a moderate oven. 
Baste occasionally if necessary. mrs. H. F. Riemer, Detroit, Mich. 

Sweetbreads 

Sweetbreads spoil very quickly. Remove from the paper as 
soon as received. Put into cold water, add a little salt, leave 
for one hour, drain, cover with boiling water, add a little salt. 
Cook slowly twenty minutes, drain and cover with cold water, 
so that they may be white and firm. To broil; cut in slices, 
sprinkle with salt and pepper, dip in bread-crumbs, saute in 
frying pan. Serve with green peas. Larkin Kitchen. 

To Roast Poultry 

One rule will apply to all poultry. 

Have oven very hot until skin is browned, then cool, and if 
poultry is stuffed, cook twenty minutes to the pound; unstufled, 
fifteen minutes. Salt pork is very nice to use for basting pur- 
poses ; baste frequently if in open pan. A covered roaster is much 
to be preferred as no basting is then required. , Larkin Kitchen. 

Fried Chicken 

Singe, clean and cut in pieces ready to serve, dip in cold water, 
drain but do not wipe; sprinkle with salt and pepper and dip 
in flour. Cook in hot pork fat or Larkin Cooking Oil, serve 
with gravy made in the pan with milk. Larkin Kitchen. 



Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



MEATS AND POULTRY 



27 



Maryland Chicken 

Dress, clean and cut up a chicken; sprinkle with salt and pepper; 
dip in flour, egg and crumbs; place in well-greased dripping 
pan and bake in hot oven, basting with butter or other fat. 
Arrange on platter and pour over it two cups cream sauce. 

Larkin Kitchen. 
Pot-Roast Chicken with Dumplings 

Cut up the chicken, wash and dip in flour, brown in hot fat, 
cover with boiling water, add pepper, salt and one carrot and 
one onion if liked. Cover kettle so all the flavor will be retained, 
simmer until tender. If an old fowl it will take two or three 
hours. When almost tender add one cup of Larkin Rice or 
drop in dumplings ten minutes before serving. Do not remove 
the cover after the dumplings are in or they will be heavy. 

Mrs. George Clansz, Pearl River, N. Y. 

Chicken Pie 

Cut up a chicken as for stewing, cover with boiling water, 
add pepper and salt, cook until tender. Remove the large bones 
and place chicken in a baking dish, slightly thicken the gravy. 
Do not have the baking dish more than three-fourths full. 
Make a good biscuit dough and cut in rounds as for biscuits. 
Place the biscuits over the chicken leaving room for the steam 
to escape. Bake in hot oven until thoroughly done. This is an 
improvement over the old style crust as the biscuit is more easily 
served and never becomes soggy, mrs. R. E. Best, Decatur, III. 

Chicken, Creole Style 

Chop fine, one green pepper, one onion and two large tomatoes, 
or use one and one-half cups of canned tomatoes. Put some 
butter or other fat in a sauce-pan, add the onion and pepper 
and cook until soft, but not brown. Brown the chicken, then 
cover it with boiling water, add the tomatoes and simmer until 
tender (if an old fowl, about two hours). Sprinkle one cup of 
washed rice over the chicken, put on lid and cook another half 
hour. This is very delicious. Veal or mutton may be used in 
place of chicken. Mj^s q Nomdeden, Baltimore, Md. 

Extra Dressing for Chicken 

In making an extra supply of dressing this is a nice way to fix 
it. Scrape out the inside of two half-loaves of bread, leave the 
crust thin. Rinse out the inside with cold water and fill with 
the extra dressing. Invert on pie tin and bake about forty-five 
minutes. This will be found very nice. 

Mrs. Andrew Richards, Perrinton, Mich. 
Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



28 



MEATS AND POULTRY 



Dressing for Geese, Ducks and Pork 

Chop, or finely slice, four onions, cook until soft, drain off the 
water, add two cups of bread-crumbs, one teaspoon dried sage, 
salt and pepper to taste. ^^^ ^^^^^^ Anderson, Dover. N. J. 

Rabbit en Casserole 

Skin, wash and cut up one or two rabbits, cover with cold 
water and stew thirty minutes. Roll in flour, season with 
salt and pepper and brown in frying pan. Put into a Larkin 
Casserole, add chopped onion, sprinkle with flour, add sufficient 
water, made slightly acid with mild vinegar, to cover. When 
rabbit is prepared in this way it loses the peculiar flavor many 
people object to. You will find this a very delicious dish. 
Bake one hour or more. Serve from the casserole. 

Mrs. R. W. Sleeter, Rockford, Iowa. 

Fried Rabbit 

Skin, wash and cut up two rabbits. Cover with cold water 
and cook until tender. The water should not boil, only simmer. 
Roll the rabbit in seasoned flour and brown in hot fat. Use 
the liquor in which they were cooked, for making gravy. 

Larkin Kitchen. 

Rabbit in Covered Roaster 

Clean and joint a rabbit, roll in flour, season with pepper and 
salt. Add a slice of pork cut up in small pieces. Place in 
covered roaster, add one pint of boiling water, put on the cover 
and bake for one hour in medium oven. Then add potatoes 
and bake another forty-five minutes. This may also be cooked 
in the same fashion as a pot roast. 

Mrs. Joseph Lardiff, Duluth, Minn. 

Filled Cabbage Leaves 

Separate the leaves of a medium-sized cabbage, pick out the 
best, pour over them boiling water, leave for a few minutes. 
Cook one-half cup rice, mix with it one pound Hamburg Steak, 
add one-half teaspoon Larkin Onion Extract, salt and pepper to 
taste. Line a kettle with the outside cabbage leaves. Fill the 
scalded leaves with the prepared meat. Roll up; lay closely 
together in kettle so they will not separate. Add one teaspoon 
salt, a little pepper, three-fourths cup canned tomatoes, three 
tablespoons bacon fat or butter, and water to almost cover. 
Put on the lid. Cook gently thirty minutes. Remove the filled 
leaves, add one egg beaten light, and the juice of one lemon to 
the liquor in the kettle. Stir until thick, but do not allow to 
boil or it will curdle. Pour sauce over cabbage leaves and 
serve at once. 



Mrs. Wm. Schneider, Buffalo, N. Y. 



Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



MEATS AND POULTRY 



29 



Stuffed Cabbage 

Wash a cabbage weighing about four pounds. Tie in a cloth 

and cook in boiling salted water until wilted. Take out and 

lay on a platter; turn back the leaves. Cut out the heart and 

place in a chopping bowl with four hard-boiled eggs, and one 

pound of pork sausage. Season with salt and black pepper, chop 

fine. Make a ball, place in center of cabbage, fold over the 

leaves one at a time, tie up in the same cloth, and boil gently for 

one and one-half hours. ,, t:- tir /- t xt 

Mrs. Edith Wilson, Grand Island, Nebr. 

COLD MEAT COOKERY 

Beef with Tomatoes 

Two cups of chopped cold meat, one cup of canned tomatoes, 
one cup of cracker- or bread-crumbs, salt and pepper. Put a 
layer of meat in a baking dish, and over it a layer of tomatoes, 
then a layer of cracker-crumbs, next a layer of meat and so on 
until dish is filled. Bake about thirty minutes. 

Mrs. Theresa Scofield, Amsterdam, N. Y. 

An Economical Meat Dish 

Take any left-over meat, chicken, beef, or pork, cut into cubes. 
Heat in gravy or a white sauce, well seasoned. Put meat in 
center of platter, surround with a can of heated Larkin Pork 
and Beans. Garnish with parsley or celery tips. This uses 
up scraps of meat you would sometimes throw away, and, 
combined with the nutritious beans, it may be used as the main 
dish for luncheon or supper. ^^^ g ^ Richardson, Topeka, Kans. 

"Different" Hash 

Put any cold meat on hand through a Larkin Food-Chopper. 
To two cups of the cold meat allow one-half pound of fresh 
round steak, put this through the food-chopper also. Cut 
up one large onion in small pieces, put some drippings into 
the frying pan; when quite hot put in the onion, brown thor- 
oughly and add the chopped raw beef, dust with salt, paprika 
and celery salt. When this is brown, add the cooked meat to 
it. Prepare raw potatoes as for potato chips and fry in another 
pan, drain and salt. Then add to the hash. Pour over some 
gravy if you have it, if not use water. Pack the hash down 
in the pan and cook over a moderate fire about ten minutes. 
Place a dish or round plate over the pan and turn out. You 
will then have a beautifully browned, savory meat dish. This 
is a little more trouble than the ordinary hash but it is worth it. 

Mrs. H. Armbruster, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



30 



MEATS AND POULTRY 



Michigan Hash 

One poui;id of Hamburg Steak, two tablespoons of chopped 
onion, one cup cooked Larkin Rice and two cups cooked Larkin 
Macaroni. Rice and macaroni may be hot or cold. Place in 
layers in baking dish; season each layer with Larkin Salt, 
Black Pepper and Celery Salt. Pour strained tomatoes over 
all until quite moist, sprinkle with cracker-crumbs and bake 
forty-five minutes in moderate oven. ^^s. Rowe, Fort Smith, Ark. 

Casserole of Rice and Meat 

Put three cups of cold cooked meat and one-half onion through 
Larkin Food-Chopper, add salt and pepper, two eggs slightly 
beaten and two tablespoons bread-crumbs. If you have any 
soup stock on hand, add sufficient to moisten well; if not, use 
milk. Butter a mold, line with boiled rice, then add layer 
of meat, then rice and so on until dish is filled. Have layer 
of rice on top. Cover closely and steam forty-five minutes. 
Serve with brown gravy or tomato sauce. 

Mrs. L. W. Kinney, Lake Charles, La. 

Turkish Rice 

Boil or steam three-fourths cup of Larkin Rice until tender. 
Then add two tablespoons of butter, mix thoroughly, and place 
on back of stove. Heat one pint of strained tomatoes, add 
soda the size of a pea, one tablespoon of sugar, salt and pepper 
to taste. Put two cups of cold chicken, veal, or beef through 
Larkin Meat-Chopper, add meat and tomatoes to rice and mix 
thoroughly. May be prepared several hours before using. 

Mrs. Thos. E. Lewis, Fostoria, Ohio. 

Minced Beef 

Put scraps of cooked meat through Larkin Food-Chopper, 
season with pepper and salt, place in a frying pan with a spoonful 
of butter and enough water to moisten. While this is heating, 
toast pieces of stale bread a light brown. Dilute one table- 
spoon of flour with a little milk and mix with the meat. Pour 
over each piece of toast and serve at once. 

Miss Carrie Steltzer, Granville, Pa. 

Chicken Cudets 

Season pieces of cold chicken or turkey with salt and pepper. 
Dip in melted butter; let this cool on the meat, and dip in 
beaten egg, then in fine bread-crumbs. Fry in hot fat until a 
delicate brown. Serve on slices of hot toast, with a cream or 
curry sauce. Pieces of cold veal are nice prepared in this way. 

Mrs. David Davies, Remsen, N. Y. 

Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



MEATS AND POULTRY 



31 



Chicken Hash with Noodles 

Put left-over chicken through Larkin Meat-Chopper, add one 
cup of gravy or a Larkin Bouillon Cube dissolved in one cup of 
hot water. Take one-quarter of a pound or one cup of Larkin 
Egg Noodles, cook in boiling water for ten minutes, drain, then 
add two cups of Larkin Tomatoes, two teaspoons of sugar, 
pepper and salt to taste. Put into Larkin Casserole or Baking 
Dish with the chicken, sprinkle top with cracker- or bread- 
crumbs. Bake in moderate oven for one-half hour. 

Frances B. Hauser, Rochester, N. Y. 

Ham Surprise 

Take two slices of Larkin Ham (cold boiled) cut in medium- 
sized pieces. Make a batter with one egg, one-half cup of 
milk, a pinch of salt, a teaspoon of Larkin Baking Powder, and 
sufficient flour to make a smooth batter, (not too thick). Dip 
piece of ham in batter and fry a delicate brown in hot fat 

Mrs, B. p. Monahan, Bridgeport, Conn. 

Salmagundi 

Cook for twenty minutes in boiling salted water, two cups of 
Larkin Short-Cut Macaroni. Drain, blanch in cold water. 
Have ready about half a pound of cold cooked beef, cut in 
cubes. Put into a Larkin Casserole, a layer of macaroni, then 
a layer of meat, a layer of sliced onion, then a layer of tomatoes 
(either canned or fresh). Dust over a little salt and pepper and 
dot with butter. Continue layers until all is used up. Have a 
layer of cracker-meal on top. Pour over any gravy you have, 
if not sufficient, use a little milk or water. Bake forty-five 
minutes. This is delicious and makes a good hearty meal. 

Mrs. James A. Cummings, Gouverneur, N. Y. 

Savory Hash 

Prepare a dressing as suggested in Mock Duck. Mix with two 
cups or one pound of cold, cooked beef, veal or pork. Mold in 
a bread pan, turn into a dripping pan, add a few slices of bacon 
or pork, or drippings. Bake slowly forty-five minutes. Serve 
with tomato sauce or brown gravy. 

Mrs. M. G. Rowe, Fort Smith, Ark. 





Escalloped Potatoes 

Pare and dice amount of raw potatoes needed. Butter a 
baking dish, put in layer of potatoes, sprinkle with flour and 
salt. Add another layer of potatoes and continue as before, 
until pan is three-fourths full. Then add sufficient cream to 
cover (milk and butter may be used in place of cream). Bake 
in hot oven for forty-five minutes. They should be brought 
to a boil quickly or the milk may curdle. 

Mrs. Irven Rystrom, Stromsburg, Nebr. 

Cheese Potatoes 

Put a layer of sliced cold potatoes into a baking dish, then a 
layer of cracker-crumbs, pepper and salt to taste, and specks 
of butter and cheese. Add another layer of potatoes and so 
on until all are used. Sprinkle grated cheese on top. Cover 
with milk and bake twenty-five minutes in a hot oven. 

Mrs. Bernice Beeson, Greenfield, Ind. 

Potatoes au Gratin 

Put a layer of diced cold potatoes into a baking dish, season 
with salt and pepper, cover with alternate layers of white sauce 
and diced potato. Cover the top with buttered bread-crumbs, 
sprinkle with grated cheese and bake in a quick oven about 
twenty-five minutes. ^^^ j^^^ ^^^^^^ Amherst. Mass. 

Onion and Potato Hash 

Chop fine two small onions, fry in meat drippings, when about 
half done add two or three cups of cold potatoes cut in dice. 
Stir all together, season with salt and pepper. 

Mrs. Frank Hastings, Saranac Lake, N. Y. 
Potato Patties 

Mash cold potatoes smooth with a fork. Add one tablespoon 
of flour, a little butter, salt and pepper; work all together and 
pat into thin round cakes. Fry in hot fat. Delicious for break- 
fast or supper. ^^^ Harvey Chambers, Maysyh^le, Ky. 

Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



VEGETABLES 



33 



Stuffed Potatoes 

Select six smooth potatoes of uniform size, wash clean, wipe 
and put into hot oven to bake. When thoroughly baked, cut 
in halves, scoop out the inside, take care not to tear shells, 
mash potato smooth, add one-half cup cream, two tablespoons 
butter, and one teaspoon of Larkin Peanut Butter. Salt to 
taste. Beat light, fill in shells, put into a baking pan and bake 
a light brown. Serve hot. If desired these can be prepared 
some time before needed, bake when ready to serve. 

Mrs. VV. L, Umbarger, Konnarock, Va. 

Potato Puffs 

Beat two cups of hot mashed potato until smooth. Stir in 

one beaten egg, one teaspoon grated onion and a little milk 

if needed. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Drop by 

spoonfuls on a buttered baking sheet. Bake in a quick oven 

until light and brown. , , „ „, „ „, ,, 

=• Mrs. H. W. Rowe, Watervdlle, Maine. 

Walnut Sweet Potatoes 

Peel and boil until tender, twelve sweet potatoes. Cut in 
quarters, place in a baking dish, baste with butter, sprinkle 
with sugar and black walnuts coarsely chopped. Bake in 
moderate oven until brown. 

Mrs. Winnie Howells, Murphysboro, III. 

Potato Fritters 

Mix together two cups of hot potatoes put through vegetable 
ricer, or mashed very fine, two eggs beaten, four tablespoons 
flour diluted with a little milk, one-fourth teaspoon Larkin 
Salt. Fry in deep hot fat, about a dessert spoonful makes a 
nice size fritter, or form into small cakes and saut6 in frying 
pan. If not thick enough, add a little more flour. 

Mrs. Margaret R. Schutte, Tampa, Fla. 

Boiled Turnips 

Peel and slice the turnips. Cover with a generous amount of 
boiling water, cook until tender, not longer. If they are to be 
mashed, drain thoroughly and mash with a wooden potato 
masher. Season with salt, butter and pepper and serve at 
once. When cooking turnips, two things should be kept in 
mind: to add salt when cooked, and not to over-cook. 
Turnips cooked in salt water become pink and develop a bitter 

^^^°^- Larkin Kitchen. 

Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



34 



VEGETABLES 



Peas in Turnip Cups 

Hollow out the centers of small white turnips. Cut the edges 
in points, steam or boil gently until tender. Make a sauce 
with two tablespoons of butter, two of flour and one cup of 
milk, add salt and one-half cup of Larkin Green Peas. When 
quite hot fill the cooked turnips and serve one to each person. 

Mrs. John Bartl, Rochester, N. Y. 

Baked Peas 

Soak one quart of Larkin Green Peas over night. In the 
morning parboil and drain. Add two tablespoons of sugar, 
one-quarter teaspoon Larkin Pepper, two teaspoons Larkin 
Salt and one pound of salt pork. Bake in bean pot adding 
water as you would for baked beans. Bake slowly all day. 
Serve for supper with brown bread. 

Florence C. Thayer, Stoneham, Mass. 

To Boil Parsnips and Carrots 

Scrape parsnips, cut in halves, put into cold water. When 
ready to cook, cover with boiling water and cook slowly until 
tender, about three-quarters of an hour. Drain, baste them 
with butter, sprinkle with pepper and salt and serve. Parsnips 
are very nice dipped in batter and fried in hot fat. Carrots 
and parsnips are good served in a cream sauce. Young carrots 
will cook in thirty minutes. Larkin Kitchen. 

To Cook String Beans 

As you string and cut the beans, put them in cold water to 
keep crisp. When ready to cook, put the beans into a sauce- 
pan, add a piece of butter such as you would use to season 
them, and a very little water. Cook over a moderate fire, add 
salt and a little more water if needed. Keep the cover on 
during the cooking; add milk when done and serve hot. The 
beans will have an excellent flavor when cooked in this way. 

Mrs. a. B. De Long, Creston, Iowa. 

String Beans with Bacon 

Remove the strings from yellow or green beans and cut in 
one-inch pieces. Slice two small onions and a small piece of 
bacon, add a pinch of Larkin Cayenne Pepper, and a little 
Larkin Salt. Put into a sauce-pan, cover with boiling water 
and cook until tender. Let the liquor cook down before taking 
from the stove. The onion is not objectionable as so small 
an amount does not give a decided taste. This is a good sub- 
stitute for a meat dish. », t- c t> -mt , 

Mrs. Elsie Seacoy, Brainerd, Minn. 

Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



VEGETABLES 



35 



To Boil Cabbage 

Cut a small head of cabbage into four parts, cutting down 
through the stalk. Soak for half an hour in a pan of cold water 
to which has been added a tablespoon of salt — this is to draw 
out any insects that may be hidden in the leaves. Take from 
the water and cut into slices. Have a large stew-pan half 
full of boiling water; put in the cabbage, pushing it under the 
water with a spoon. Add one tablespoon of salt and cook from 
twenty-five to forty-five minutes, depending upon the age of 
the cabbage. Turn into a colander and drain for about two 
minutes. Put into a chopping bowl and mince. Season with 
butter, pepper, and more salt if required. Allow a tablespoon 
of butter to a generous pint of the cooked vegetable. Cabbage 
cooked in this manner will be of delicate flavor and may be 
generally eaten without distress. Have the kitchen windows 
open at the top while the cabbage is boiling and there will be 
little if any odor of cabbage in the house. Parkin Kitchen. 

Cabbeige Germain Style 

Cut the cabbage on a slaw cutter, put into a kettle, add salt and 
about four tablespoons meat drippings or butter, add sufficient 
water to keep it from burning. Cover closely and steam forty- 
five minutes until tender, but not soft. Beat one egg until 
light, add a cup of sour cream, and a little sugar. Mix with 
the cabbage; do not let it boil or the egg will curdle. Serve 

3.t oncG 

Mrs. Quincy R. Sherry, Connersville, Ind^ 

Com Fritters 

One cup flour, one teaspoon salt, two eggs, one-half cup milk, 

one teaspoon melted butter, one-third teaspoon pepper, one 

teaspoon baking powder, two cups Larkin Canned Corn. Sift 

together the flour, salt and baking powder, in a bowl. Separate 

the eggs; beat yolks light, add the milk. Pour gradually into 

the flour mixture and stir to a smooth batter. Add butter 

and corn; cut and fold into the batter the stiffly-beaten egg 

whites. Fry by the spoonful in deep hot fat. Drain on soft 

paper. Serve at once. This batter may also be used for fruit 

and other vegetables fritters. ht i^ ^^ ttt 

* Miss Delia Tagatz, Wautoma, Wis. 

Corn Oysters 

Beat two eggs light, add one can of Larkin Corn, one tablespoon 
melted butter, and one-half cup of flour sifted with one-half 
teaspoon salt. Fry on hot griddle by the spoonful. Serve 
with cold meat or as a dessert with Larkin Maple Syrup or 
noney. ^^^^ Bessie Binnall, Dow City, I a. 

Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



36 



VEGETABLES 



Green Corn Pudding 

Cut the corn from six nice fresh ears; add two beaten eggs, two 
tablespoons of butter, one-half teaspoon salt. Break up six 
Larkin Soda Crackers, cover with one pint of milk, leave for 
ten minutes, add to the other ingredients. Bake in moderate 
oven about twenty minutes or until nicely browned. This is 
n"^^- Miss Carrie Steltzer, Granville, Pa, 

Fried Tomatoes 

Take solid tomatoes, not overripe, and slice in one-fourth-inch 
slices. Season with salt and pepper, dip into beaten egg and 
Larkin Cracker Meal. Fry in Larkin Cooking Oil or bacon 
fat until golden brown. Serve with bacon, ham or steak. 

Mrs. L. Loeffler, Glendale, L. I., N. Y. 

Tomato Cakes 

Beat four eggs light. Add one can of Larkin Tomatoes and 
three tablespoons melted butter, pepper and salt to taste. /Stir 
in cracker-crumbs to make it stiff enough to drop by the spoon- 
ful on a hot greased griddle. Brown on both sides. Serve 
at once. Good for luncheon or supper. 

Mrs. Mary Chapman, Santa Rosa, Fla. 

Tomatoes and Rice 

Steam one cup of rice in three cups of water until tender, add one 
can of Larkin Tomatoes, one teaspoon salt, one-quarter tea- 
spoon white pepper, a small piece of butter, two tablespoons 
of sugar and one grated onion. Bring to a boil, serve hot. 
I , Will taste better if left standing for one hour before serving. 

Mrs. John M. Ford, Lucas, Kansas. 

Larkin Special 

Cut up one slice of Larkin Ham and three onions, in small 
pieces. Cook together in frying pan, add one can of Larkin 
Tomatoes, pepper, and salt to taste, and when boiling, add 
one-half box of Larkin Noodles. Cook for twenty-five or 
thirty minutes. Serve hot. j^^^ j^^^^^ E. West, Glouster, Ohio. 

Boiled Rice 

Pick over one cup of rice, put into strainer and wash thoroughly. 
For one cup of rice allow two quarts of boiling water, add one 
tablespoon salt. Have the water boiling rapidly during the 
entire time of cooking. Boil for fifteen or twenty minutes, if 
the rice is old it takes longer to cook. Drain in colander, pour 
over it one quart of hot water, place on oven door or back of 
range to dry off. Larkin Kitchen. 



Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



VEGETABLES 



37 



Steamed Rice 

Put three cups of boiling water into Larkin Double-Boiler No. 
210. Sprinkle in one cup of rice which has been washed and 
drained, add one teaspoon salt. Steam for thirty minutes. 
Serve with milk or cream and sugar. Milk may be used in 
place of water, if desired. Larkin Kitchen. 

Baked Rice 

To serve with chicken or as a vegetable. Wash one cup of 
rice, drain and put into a buttered dish or casserole, add one- 
half teaspoon of salt, pour two and one-half cups of water over 
it. Cover and bake in a quick oven one-half hour. Uncover 
and steam dry. Lay slices of Larkin Bacon over the top, place 
in oven until brown, serve hot. mrs. Philip Gokey, Mooers, N. Y. 

Rice Croquettes 

Take one and a half cups of cold cooked rice or one-half cup of 
uncooked rice and steam in double sauce-pan, when tender add 
a beaten egg, one teaspoon onion juice or one-half teaspoon 
Larkin Onion Extract, one-half teaspoon salt and a dash of 
cayenne pepper and ground nutmeg. Mix thoroughly together, 
spread on a shallow plate to cool. When cold cut in small 
squares, dip in cracker-crumbs, beaten egg then cracker-crumbs 
again. Fry in hot fat. Dish on hot platter, garnish with green 
peas. This makes a very attractive supper dish. 

Mrs. Florence G. Chipman, Attleboro, Mass. 

Rice and Pimentos 

Boil one cup of Larkin Rice in salted water until tender, chop 
fine one-half can of Larkin Pimentos. Slice thin or grate one- 
fourth of a pound of Larkin Cheese. Beat two eggs light, add 
one and a half cups of milk, two teaspoons Larkin Salt and one- 
quarter teaspoon Black Pepper. Mix altogether and bake in 
moderate oven twenty minutes. 

Mrs. Starl D, Cook, Lansing, Mich. 
Spanish Peppers 

Prepare six large sweet peppers. Boil one cup of Larkin Rice 
until soft, add one-half pound chopped round steak, dice six 
slices of Larkin Bacon, add a little chopped parsley, salt and 
pepper to taste. Mix thoroughly and fill the peppers. Strain 
one can of Larkin Tomatoes, add a little water and sugar, a 
pinch of cloves and cinnamon. Stand the filled peppers in a 
baking dish, surround with the tomato sauce and cook gently 
until soft (about twenty-five minutes). Rice, bacon, salt, 
pepper, tomatoes, sugar, cinnamon, and cloves were all bought 
from Larkin Co. Mrs. C. Adams, Harrisburg, Pa. 

Use Level Measurements Ofily. See Page 6. 



38 



VEGETABLES 



Stuffed Green Peppers 

For eight good-sized peppers, use one pint of cold boiled halibut 
or any other white fish. Mix with a white sauce made of one 
and one-half tablespoons of butter, one tablespoon of flour and 
one-half pint of milk. Season with Larkin Pepper and Salt 
and a few drops of Worcestershire Sauce. Add one raw egg 
slightly beaten, cook for two minutes, and fill prepared peppers. 
Put bread-crumbs and small pieces of butter on top and bake 
in hot oven twenty minutes. ^^^^ ^ j lawall, Newark, N. J. 

Stuffed Sweet Peppers 

Six large peppers, one pint of tomatoes, one cup bread-crumbs, 
one large onion, one teaspoon salt, one-fourth teaspoon celery 
salt, one-fourth teaspoon pepper, one tablespoon butter. 
Remove top and seeds and soak the peppers in salt water for 
two hours. Mix together tomatoes and bread-crumbs, grate 
half of the onion, add seasonings, mix thoroughly and stuff the 
peppers. Place in a baking pan with the rest of the onion cut in 
small pieces. Add a little pork fat or butter and a very little 
water. Bake slowly one-half hour, basting often. 

Mrs. W. a. Tindall, Maryville, Mo. 

Baked Beans 

Take one pint of Larkin Pea Beans, soak over night in cold 
water. Drain and add enough cold water to cover, put on 
fire and when they begin to boil, drain off water, add cold water 
as before, also one small onion chopped fine, one teaspoon salt 
and two or three slices of Larkin Bacon. Cook until beans are 
almost done, add two tablespoons of Larkin Canned Tomatoes, 
two tablespoons Larkin Molasses, and a pinch of Larkin Soda. 
Put in covered baking dish, arranging slices of bacon on top, and 
sprinkle with pepper. Bake four or five hours, adding hot water 
as needed to keep moist. ^^^^ g p^ Monahan, Bridgeport, Conn. 

Bciked Beans with Meat 

Cover one quart of Larkin Dried Beans with cold water and 
soak over night. Drain, add water to cover, parboil until 
skins crack when blown on. Drain the beans and cover the 
bottom of Larkin Double-Boiler No. 210, three inches deep 
with beans. Add one large onion, one-half pound of salt pork 
and one-half pound of fresh pork (shank is good). Add remain- 
der of beans, two tablespoons molasses, maple syrup or brown 
sugar, also a little salt. Add the strained juice from one can 
of tomatoes. Boil gently all day until supper time. 

Belle D. Robinson, Williamstown, Vt. 



Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



VEGETABLES 



39 



A New Supper Dish 

Take one can of Larkin Pork and Beans, four potatoes, one 
onion finely chopped, one-half teaspoon Larkin Celery Salt, 
one-fourth teaspoon Larkin Pepper. Cut each potato in four 
pieces, put all ingredients into sauce-pan. Add two cups of 
boiling water; cook thirty minutes. Serve hot. Sufficient for 
five people. Cheap and nourishing. 

Mrs. J. K. Foster, Seaford, Va. 

Chafing-Dish Special 

Put two tablespoons butter in the chafing-dish, add one cup of 
Larkin Pork and Beans which have been mashed thoroughly 
through a sieve. Add gradually one cup of milk; when quite 
hot and well blended add one cup of diced cheese or scraps of 
dry cheese grated. Two tablespoons of Larkin Chili Sauce 
improves the flavor and should be added with the cheese. It 
is ready to serve when the cheese is melted. 

Mrs. Leslie E. Bushnell, New London, Conn. 

Baked Lentils 

Soak two cups of dry lentils over night. In the morning 
drain and add one quart of hot water. When the water 
boils the lentils will rise to the top. Lift out with a skimmer 
and put them in a Larkin Casserole or a Baking Dish. 
Place a quarter of a pound of salt pork in the center of the 
lentils, and one small onion. Mix three teaspoons salt and 
fourth of a teaspoon of pepper with two cups of boiling water. 
Add to lentils. The lentils must be kept moist. If necessary 
add a little more water during the cooking. Bake in a moderate 
oven six to ten hours, or in a Larkin Fireless Cooker ten hours. 

Larkin Kitchen. 

Lentil Croquettes 

Soak one cup of lentils and one-half cup of Larkin Red 
Beans over night, drain, add two cups of water. Cut up 
one small onion, one small head of celery, one small carrot, 
and three sprigs of parsley. Cook until quite soft, then press 
through a sieve, add one cup of bread-crumbs, one beaten 
egg, salt and pepper to taste. Make a sauce by creaming 
together three tablespoons of butter and three tablespoons of 
flour, add two-thirds of a cup of cream, (Larkin Evaporated 
Milk may be used). Stir until boiling, add to lentil mixture. 
Mix thoroughly, cool, shape, dip in egg and crumbs and fry 
in Larkin Cooking Oil. Drain on soft paper. Serve at once. 

Mrs. John A. Conover, Gambrills, Md. 
Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



40 



VEGETABLES 



Lentil Stew 

Pick over and wash one cup of lentils, soak over night 
in a quart of water. The next morning put them on the fire 
and simmer in the water in which they were soaked. This 
will take about three hours. Add any vegetables you have on 
hand. I use a small onion and one potato. A little left-over 
meat or gravy or both added to stew during the last half hour 
gives it a delicious flavor. Cut the meat into small pieces. 
Keep just enough water on lentils so they will not burn. Add 
salt, pepper and butter to taste, before serving. We have 
this meal instead of meat at short intervals and find it very 
satisfactory. To cook with ham or corned beef prepare in 
the same way, using more water. 

Mrs. W. R. Young, No. Tonawanda, N. Y. 

A Good Supper Dish 

Boil one cup of lentils as directed in recipe for Lentil Stew. 
Boil an equal quantity of rice. While these are cooking, 
prepare a pint of sauce by using two cups of Larkin Canned 
Tomatoes, a small piece of bay leaf, a fair-sized onion chopped 
fine and a blade of mace. Cook slowly for thirty minutes, then 
thicken with two tablespoons flour blended with three of butter. 
Carefully add the hot stock. Boil for a few minutes, then 
pour over the lentils and rice. Place the rice around the edge 
of platter and pile the lentils in the center. Will serve four or 
five people. Larkin Kitchen. 




SMADS AND 




Potato Salad 

Cut six medium-sized cold boiled potatoes, three hard-boiled 

eggs, one onion, and one head celery, in small pieces, and mix 

thoroughly with boiled dressing. Serve on lettuce hearts; 

garnish with small radishes. „ „ „ ^^ „ ^ 

° Helena E. Pierson, Norwood, R. I, 

Vegetable Salad 

Two cups cabbage, one cup celery, one cup cucumbers, one large 
onion, one cup cold boiled potatoes, three hard-boiled eggs, all 
finely cut, and two green peppers cut in rings. Serve with 
boiled dressing on lettuce leaves. 

Mrs. H. J. Moorman, Lawrenceburg, Ind. 

Combination Salad 

Chop fine two sweet peppers, five good-sized apples, four pieces 
or stalks of tender celery. Remove the pulp from six tomatoes 
and add it to the other ingredients. Mix with salad dressing. 
Fill the tomato shells with the mixture. Serve on lettuce 

Mrs. Jno. P. Grant, Delaware, Okla. 

Larkin Tomato Salad 

Put two teaspoons Larkin Gelatine to soak in one-half cup 
cold water. Heat one can Larkin Tomato Soup, add one tea- 
spoon salt, a dash of cayenne, a few drops Larkin Onion Extract. 
Add the softened gelatine; mold in small cups. When firm 
serve on lettuce leaves with Larkin Salad Dressing. 

Mrs. August Halberslaben, Madison, Wis. 

Cabbage Salad 

Cut a hard cabbage into halves and then with a very sharp 
knife shred fine the desired quantity; as you shred it put it 
into a bowl of very cold water and leave for two hours. It 
will be more crisp if you change the water once or twice. When 
ready to serve, put into a cloth and swing around until dry. 
Mix with simple dressing and serve at once, or the cabbage 
will lose its crispness. Celery may be added if liked. 

Mrs. G. K. Garrett, Pequea, Pa. 



Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



42 



SALADS AND DRESSINGS 



Combination Cabbage Salad 

Soak one-half package Larkin Gelatine in one-half cup cold 
water for a few minutes, add one quart boiling water, one cup 
vinegar, juice of one lemon, one-half cup sugar and one teaspoon 
salt. When cold add two cups cabbage shredded fine, one and 
one-half cups celery cut fine and one-fourth can Larkin Pimentos 
cut fine. Pour into small teacups. When firm serve on lettuce 
with a spoonful of whipped cream into which has been stirred 
sufficient Larkin Salad Dressing to flavor. When preparing 
this just for ourselves, I pour it into a meat pan and cut in 
squares to serve. This should be served with the meat course. 

Mrs. J. C. Clark, KNOXvn.LE, I a. 

Cream Slaw 

Slice or chop one quart of cabbage, keep in cold water until 
ready to serve. Put one-fourth cup vinegar, one and one- 
half tablespoons sugar, and four tablespoons butter into a 
sauce-pan on the fire. Beat one egg light, mix with one table- 
spoon flour, add one cup sweet cream, salt and pepper. Add the 
hot vinegar to this, cook until thickened and pour over the crisp 
cabbage. Serve at once. ^^^ ^ ^ ^^^^^ g^ Pasadena, Calif. 

Simple Dressing for Cabbage 

A very good dressing to serve with cabbage is whipped cream, 
either sweet or sour, into which has been stirred sufficient 
vinegar to make it tart, and a little sugar, salt and paprika. 
Do not mix with the cabbage until serving time. This dressing 
is also good with lettuce. ^^^ ^ ^ ^^^^^^^ p^^^^^^ p^^ 

Bean Salad No. 1 

Drain liquor from one can Larkin Red Kidney Beans, add one 
head of celery or three chopped onions. Chop four hard-boiled 
eggs, one dozen small sweet pickles, and one cup nut meats. 
Mix all together and add hot mayonnaise made as follows: 
Yolks of four eggs, one-half cup sugar, scant cup weak vinegar, 
two teaspoons Larkin Corn Starch, four tablespoons butter, — 
salt and pepper to taste. Bring to a boil, stirring constantly. 

Mrs. Kooch Wilson, Attica, Ind. 

Bean Salad No. 2 

Empty one can Larkin Red Kidney Beans, rinse with cold 
water. Add one cup Larkin StufTed Manzanilla Olives cut in 
small pieces, and one cup diced celery. Mix all thoroughly 
and serve with Larkin Salad Dressing on lettuce leaves, 

Mrs. Walter R. Holloway, Murphysboro, III. 

Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



SALADS AND DRESSINGS 43 

Bean Salad No. 3 

One can Larkin Pork and Beans, two cups of diced boiled ham, 
one good-sized Spanish onion, one large sweet green pepper, a 
little salt and pepper. Mix all thoroughly and when ready to 
serve, place on a bed of lettuce leaves and cover with good 
dressing. Hard-boiled eggs may also be placed on top. This 
is a very fine dish for a Sunday night tea. 

Mrs. Geo. S. Brain, Jersey City, N. J. 

Salad Delight 

Wash one cup Larkin Rice ; put on to cook in two quarts boiling 
salted water. Cook until tender but do not allow it to become 
too soft. Drain, and pour one quart boiling water through the 
rice. Dry on the oven door shaking occasionally to keep 
separated. Allow two tablespoons rice to one tablespoon 
salted ground almonds. Place on lettuce leaves, cut four 
oranges in small pieces, cover with sugar to form juice. Put 
one tablespoon juice with several small pieces of orange, over 
rice. Then add one tablespoon cream salad dressing. Place a 
very thin slice of orange on top and a salted almond on the orange. 
Serve with tea and wafers for a lunch at a Club-of-Ten party. 

Florence Thayer, Stoneham, Mass. 

Miscellaneous ScJad 

One-quarter pound mild cheese cut in small pieces, or grated; 
add three-fourths cup chopped sweet pickles, one cup chopped 
celery, and one cup broken walnut meats. Add sufficient 
boiled dressing to mix. ^^^^ ^ j^^^^^^ p^^^^^^ ^^ 

Chicken Scdad No. 1 

Cut cold boiled chicken in dice, add an equal amount of celery cut 
fine and one cup blanched almonds cut in halves. Season with 
salt and pepper. Stir into this a few tablespoons mayonnaise; 
set away for an hour or more. Just before serving, arrange 
on lettuce leaves and cover with thick mayonnaise. Garnish 
with celery tips, Larkin Olives, and Pimentos cut in strips. 

Mrs. Sadie Chamberlain, Pontiac, III. 

Chicken Salad No. 2 

One cup chicken meat cut in small pieces, one cucumber cut 
in cubes, one cup English walnut meats broken in pieces, one- 
half can Larkin Peas, and two cups celery cut in strips. Mix 
with a silver fork, add one cup good salad dressing. Serve 
very cold in nests of lettuce. Garnish with Larkin Pimentos 
cut m points. ^^^^ j^^ Hauser, Rochester, N. Y. 

Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



44 SALADS AND DRESSINGS 

Chicken Salad No. 3 

Mix together one can Larkin Deviled Chicken and twice the 
amount of crisp chopped cabbage. Add one-fourth teaspoon 
Larkin Celery Salt. Use a good salad dressing, serve on lettuce 

Mrs. Ernest C. Thurmond, Ash Grove, Mo. 

Salmon Salad No. 1 

Flake one can Larkin Salmon, add four medium-sized cooked 
potatoes cut in cubes, four Larkin Pickles cut into small pieces, 
two cups finely-cut cabbage. Make a dressing with yolks of 
two eggs beaten light, one teaspoon salt, pinch of pepper, one 
teaspoon sugar, two teaspoons Larkin Mustard, one tablespoon 
butter, and four tablespoons Larkin Vinegar. Put into a 
Larkin Double-Boiler, stir until thickened, cool, add sufificient 
milk to thin out. Serve on lettuce leaves. 

Sarah E. Burns, Swathmore, Pa. 

Salmon Salad No. 2 

Six hard-boiled eggs chopped fine, two mashed potatoes, one 
can Larkin Red Alaska Salmon, four sour pickles chopped fine. 
Mix all together with a good boiled dressing flavored with 
Larkm Celery Salt. ^^^^ Nettie L. Raney, Tullahoma, Tenn. 

Marshmallow Salad 

Cut up one-half pound Larkin Marshmallows, pour over them 
one-half can Larkin Pineapple, grated. Stand this aside 
several hours. Then add three sliced bananas, one-fourth 
pound chopped walnut meats, two oranges cut in pieces, add 
one-half cup whipped cream. Serve on crisp lettuce leaves. 
This is delicious. ^j^3 g ^ Albrecht. Jamaica. N. Y. 

Fruit Salad Supreme 

One-half package Larkin Gelatine and pink coloring powder. 
One-half cup cold water. Three cups freshly-boiled water. 
Juice of one lemon. One cup sugar. Three bananas. Two 
oranges. Moisten gelatine in cold water, add sugar, juice of 
lemon, pink coloring powder and boiling water. Put half of 
this into mold. When this begins to set, slice the bananas 
and arrange them in it. Then take the other half which has 
started to set and beat until light and fluffy as whipped cream. 
Pour this on the first half and arrange the oranges cut in sec- 
tions on the top. Any canned fruit may be used in place of 

^^^^"* Mrs. Percy S. Macumber, Corning, N. Y. 

Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



SALADS AND DRESSINGS 



45 



Fruit Salad No. 1 

Peel and dice three bananas, one orange, and one small apple. 
Cut in cubes one-half can Larkin Pineapple. Chop one-half 
cup English walnut meats, add one cup Larkin Canned Peaches, 
and three tablespoons cherry preserves. Mix all together using 
a silver fork, sprinkle one cup granulated sugar over the fruit. 
Thicken the fruit juice with corn starch, allowing one table- 
spoon corn starch to one cup of juice. Add sugar if needed 
and one tablespoon butter; when quite cold pour over the 
fruit. Serve on lettuce leaves or in sherbet glasses for dessert. 

Mrs. M. E. Barlow, Farmington, III. 

Fruit Salad No. 2 

Four bananas, two oranges, three apples, one-half can pine- 
apple, one-half cup English walnuts, one cup marshmallows. 
Cut the fruit, nuts and marshmallows in pieces, and mix all 
together (except the nuts). Add nuts just before serving as 
they turn the salad dark if put in too soon. Mix with cream 
dressing and serve on crisp lettuce leaves. 

Mrs. Bernice Beeson, Greenfield, Ind. 

White Grape Salad 

Halve and seed one pound white grapes. Cut up quite fine 
the best part of two heads of celery and the meat from one-half 
pound English walnuts. Mix with cream or French salad 
dressing. Serve on crisp lettuce leaves. 

Mrs. Frank S. Merrill, Bristol, Conn. 
Cherry Salad 

Stone one-half pound cherries, saving all juice. Dice a small 

cucumber, chop fine a dozen blanched almonds. Cook together 

until slightly thick, one cup cherry juice, two tablespoons lemon 

juice, and one-half cup sugar. When cool add two drops 

Larkin Almond Extract and when quite cold add to the salad 

mixture, mixing gently with two silver forks. Serve on crisp 

lettuce leaves. Canned cherries may be used when fresh ones 

are not in season. n^r^^ c-„..,^^ u. r> xt ir 

Mrs. Frances Hauser, Rochester, N. Y, 

Pineapple Salad 

One can Larkin Sliced Pineapple. One head of crisp lettuce, one 
bottle Maraschino cherries. Make a nest of two blanched lettuce 
leaves on individual salad plates. Put one slice of pineapple on 
each plate, cover with cream salad dressing, and put a cherry in 
center of each piece. Sprinkle with ground walnuts. This is a 
very pretty salad and most delicious. Canned Bartlett Pears 
with a sprinkling of lemon juice, may be substituted for the 
pineapple. j^jsg £^^ l. Davidson, Cherryvale, Kansas. 



Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



46 



SALADS AND DRESSINGS 



Banana Salad 

Remove skins and cut in half lengthwise as many bananas as 
are needed, allowing one-half banana for each person. Mix 
Larkin Salad Dressing with whipped cream, roll banana in 
the dressing, then in chopped nuts. Walnuts, peanuts, or 
pecans, may be used. Serve on a lettuce leaf. A small spoon- 
ful of the dressing may be placed on the side of the plates and 
also two Larkin Saltines. ^^^ j^^ ^yler, Plainfield. N. J. 

September Salad 

Pare, core and chop two ripe apples and one sweet red or green 
pepper. Add one cup diced celery, two tablespoons chopped 
onion, two teaspoons finely chopped parsley, and one cup 
Larkin Shredded Cocoanut, Mix thoroughly. Serve with 
French or cooked salad dressing in tomato shells or on lettuce 

1g3.VGS 

iv-avv-o. Mrs. Pearl M. Hacker, Council Bluffs, I a. 

Tomato Surprise 

Peel three tomatoes and carefully scoop out the centers. Place 
them upside down to drain. Wash, dry and cut in one-inch 
pieces, four sticks of celery from a firm stalk. Break six eggs 
into a large bowl; beat quite light. Add to them one-half tea- 
spoon Larkin Salt, a few grains of Cayenne Pepper, one-half 
teaspoon Larkin Onion Extract, four tablespoons milk. Pour 
into' buttered pan and cook as for scrambled eggs. When 
cooked, add the celery and the tomato pulp cut in small pieces. 
Fill the tomato with the mixture and serve on lettuce leaves 
with Larkin Salad Dressing. ^^^^ j^_ ^ Thomson, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Lobster Salad 

Open one can Larkin Lobster and turn out on a china dish. 
Cut into cubes. Add three hard-boiled eggs coarsely chopped. 
Mix two tablespoons Larkin Salad Dressing with one cup 
whipped cream. Mix ingredients carefully together. Serve 
on lettuce leaves, garnish with three half slices of tomatoes. 
Sprinkle with finely chopped sweet green peppers and serve 
with Larkin Saltines. Larkin Kitchen. 

Meat Relish No. 1 

To three quarts chopped cooked beets, take one quart raw 
cabbage chopped, one cup grated horseradish, two cups sugar, 
one tablespoon Larkin Salt. Mix all thoroughly, put in a jar 
and cover with cold vinegar. This is easy to make and very 

^° Mrs. W. C. Obendorf, Sterling, III. 

Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



SALADS AND DRESSINGS 47 

Meat Relish No. 2 

Take one-half can Larkin Pimentos, three cups cabbage, nine 
sour pickles, two small onions. Squeeze out the vinegar from 
the pickles and put all the ingredients through a Larkin Food- 
Chopper. Mix together one teaspoon salt, one-half cup sugar 
and one-half cup vinegar (or vinegar and water mixed, depend- 
ing on the strength of the vinegar). Stir all together and leave 
for one hour before serving. Excellent with cold meat. 

Mrs. K. K. Haggstrom, Cheyenne, Wyo. 

Tomato and String Bean Salad 

Scald and remove skins from six firm tomatoes, cool, cut a 
slice off one end and gently scoop out inside. Have one pint 
of fresh string beans boiled in salted water and cut in small 
pieces. Mix with tomato pulp. Make a dressing with one 
tablespoon of oil, two tablespoons vinegar, one teaspoon Larkin 
Tomato Catsup, one-half teaspoon salt, one-eighth teaspoon 
pepper. Add to this one tablespoon Larkin Gelatine; dissolve 
in one-half cup boiling water. Mix well, cool, add to string 
beans, and fill tomato cases. Put away on Ice a couple of hours 
before using. Serve on lettuce leaves with mayonnaise. 

Mrs. a. J. Lawall, Newark, N. J. 

Cooked Dressing 

Stir together one tablespoon Larkin Dry Mustard, one table- 
spoon Larkin Corn Starch, three tablespoons sugar, one teaspoon 
Larkin Salt, a few specks of Larkin Cayenne Pepper and a 
pinch of Larkin Soda. Add two well-beaten eggs, one cup 
milk, one tablespoon butter, and lastly (beating constantly) 
one cup weak vinegar. Cook until thick and creamy, stirring 

all the time. iv^ t tt r^ ^ ^ 

Mrs. John H. Fitzpatrick, Old Chatham, N. Y. 

Uncooked Dressing 

Stir together one teaspoon Larkin Prepared Mustard, two tea- 
spoons sugar, one-half teaspoon salt, and one-quarter teaspoon 
Larkin White Pepper. Add one cup Larkin Evaporated Milk; 
mix thoroughly, then slowly add three tablespoons Larkin 
Vinegar. Mix well and it is ready for use. 

Mrs. Geo, Raupp, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Dressing for Cabbage 

Mix together one teaspoon sugar, one-half teaspoon Larkin 
Mustard, one-half teaspoon Larkin Salt and one beaten egg. 
Add four tablespoons vinegar and eight tablespoons cream. 
Cook until thick in a double-boiler, stirring constantly. 

Mrs. Wm. Noller, Troy, N. Y. 



Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



48 



SALADS AND DRESSINGS 



Easy Mayonnaise 

I have discovered that when oil dressing is made in the following 
manner it never fails. To the yolks of two fresh eggs, add one 
tablespoon vinegar, beat well, then add one-fourth teaspoon 
salt and one-half cup or more Larkin Olive Oil; beat constantly 
while pouring it in. The old-fashioned way is to drop the oil 
in very slowly but if the vinegar is added to the eggs first, the 
oil may be poured in much faster, and the mayonnaise will never 
curdle. Season with Larkin Celery Salt, Larkin Onion Extract, 
Mustard or any other seasoning you prefer. 

Mrs. Melvin Smith, Avon, N. Y. 
Crecimy Salad Dressing 

Put into a double sauce-pan four lightly-beaten eggs, and one- 
half cup each of vinegar and water. Stir over the fire until thick, 
then add one-half cup butter. Mix together one teaspoon each 
of Larkin Mustard and sugar and a pinch of white or cayenne 
pepper. Add a spoonful of the cooked dressing to these season- 
ings and stir until smooth. Add balance of dressing and thor- 
oughly mix. Thin with milk or cream as needed. Use more 
vinegar if liked quite sour. Whipped cream folded into this 
makes a very light dressing for salad. This will keep for weeks 
in a Mason jar if screwed down tight and left in a cool place. 

Mrs. Eva S. Pugh, Brownell, Kans. 

Sue's Salad Dressing 

Mix one teaspoon Larkin Mustard, one teaspoon sugar, and 
the yolks of two eggs. Add one-half cup vinegar and cook until 
thick. Then fold in the stifily-beaten whites of two eggs. 
Cook for two minutes, cool, thin out with milk or cream as 
needed. The beaten whites insure a light, fluffy dressing. 

Miss Sue Miller, Edenville, Pa. 

Peanut Dressing 

Mix together in a small bowl two tablespoons Larkin Peanut 
Butter, two tablespoons lemon juice, two tablespoons cold 
water, one teaspoon Larkin Salad Dressing and one-eighth 
teaspoon Larkin Salt. This is a delicious dressing to serve on 
lettuce, onions, cabbage, etc. 

Mrs. Alex. Jackson, Favetteville, N. Car. 

French Dressing 

Rub a small bowl with garlic or onion, then put in one-half 
teaspoon Larkin Salt, one-fourth teaspoon each of Larkin White 
Pepper, Mustard, Sugar and paprika, add six tablespoons 
Larkin Olive Oil, stir in drop by drop two tablespoons Larkin 
Vinegar. If the oil floats, too much vinegar has been used. 

Larkin Kitchen. 

Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



SALADS AND DRESSINGS w 

Mother's Salad Dressing 

Cook three eggs until hard ; cover with cold water. Take one- 
half can Larkin Evaporated Milk (Baby Size), slowly add one- 
half cup Larkin Cider Vinegar to the milk, one teaspoon salt, 
a dash of pepper and one tablespoon granulated sugar. Shell 
the eggs, cut in half, remove yolks and mash very fine. Add 
to above mixture. Cut whites of eggs into rings for garnishing. 
This is delicious on lettuce or raw cabbage. 

Mrs. Clayton E. Hackett, Marshalltown, Iowa. 

Dressing for Two 

Put three teaspoons sugar, one-fourth teaspoon mustard, one- 
half teaspoon Larkin Celery Salt and a little pepper into a 
bowl, add one egg, beat until thoroughly mixed. Now add 
three tablespoons vinegar, one tablespoon each of butter and 
water, cook in double sauce-pan until thick. When cool thin 
with milk or cream. mrs. Cora Edwards, Memphis, Tenn. 

Salad Suggestions 

A person with ingenuity will make a salad with whatever 
happens to be on hand. Here are a few suggestions: 

Equal parts of white grapes (seeded) and diced bananas. 

Juicy apples and oranges, cut in dice. Add a few Maraschino 
cherries. 

Hard-boiled eggs, celery and English walnuts. 

Apples, oranges and blanched almonds. 

Marshmallows, walnuts and pineapple. 

Tuna Fish, celery and boiled dressing. 

Chopped beets, cabbage and hard-boiled eggs. 

Cabbage and apples, boiled dressing. 





To Boil Eggs 

Eggs are cooked in many ways, but for cooking in the shell 
there is no better way than to put the egg into one pint of 
boiling water, cover, stand in a warm place, leave for six minutes, 
when the eggs will be cooked through, but soft; if liked very 
soft, allow less time. Be sure to have enough water, according 
to the number of eggs; if two eggs are needed use one quart of 
water, and so on accordingly. To cook eggs hard leave them 
in the water for thirty-five minutes. Then put them in cold 
water for five minutes. Larkin Kitchen. 

To Turn and Fold an Omelet 

Tip pan so as to bring one side of omelet higher than the other. 
Place spatula under higher side and tipping pan to almost a 
vertical position, carefully fold over. If a half-inch cut is first 
made at each end of fold, the omelet folds more easily and with- 
out breaking. Larkin Kitchen. 

Poached Eggs 

Have a shallow pan nearly full of boiling salted water, remove 
scum and reduce temperature until water is motionless; break 
an egg into a saucer and slip into the water; when a film has 
formed over the yolk and the white is firm, take up with a 
skimmer and place on toast which has been trimmed into shape. 
A much easier way is to use Larkin Double-Boiler and Egg- 
Poacher which poaches five eggs at one time. larkin Kitchen. 

French Omelet 

To four eggs allow three-fourths cup cold water, — salt and 
pepper to taste. Beat the eggs very light, then add the water 
and thoroughly mix. Pour into hot greased frying pan, run 
spatula around the edges and lift slightly to allow the thin 
part to run underneath. Serve at once on a hot platter. 

Larkin Kitchen. 

Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



EGGS 



51 



Puffy Omelet 

Separate three eggs; with the yolks, put a little pepper, salt 
and one tablespoon cold water; beat the whites to a stiff froth; 
lightly mix in the yolks. Make a pan rather hot, grease lightly, 
pour in the mixture, cook three minutes on hot stove, then 
place in a hot oven and cook until just setting; fold over and 
turn onto a hot platter. If your oven is not hot turn the omelet 
carefully over and finish cooking on top of stove. Minced ham, 
or beef, with a tablespoon chopped parsley, is very good, either 
stirred into the mixture or placed on the top. Grated cheese is 
very nice sprinkled over the omelet just as you put it in the oven. 

Larkin Kitchen. 

Corn Omelet 

Use rule given for puffy omelet. Fold in one-half cup canned 

corn; take care not to stir the mixture. 

Larkin Kitchen. 

Bread-Cnimb Omelet 

Separate the whites and yolks of three eggs. Beat the yolks 

light, add to them one-half cup fine bread-crumbs, one-fourth 

teaspoon salt, a few grains of pepper and one-half cup milk. 

Then fold in the stifffy-beaten whites. Put two teaspoons 

butter into a smooth frying pan, when hot pour in the omelet 

and cook over a slow fire. Use a Larkin Spatula to turn the 

omelet or put into hot oven to finish the cooking. Fold into 

a half circle and serve at once as any egg mixture falls if left 

standing. r, a r, 

Bertha A. Bottner, Petrolia, Pa. 

Stuffed Eggs 

Boil six eggs twenty minutes. Cover with cold water for five 

minutes. Shell the eggs, cut in halves, remove yolks, add to yolks 

one teaspoon Larkin Prepared Mustard, a few specks of Larkin 

Black Pepper, one-half teaspoon salt, one tablespoon butter, 

and sufficient milk or cream to moisten. Fill each hollow where 

yolks were removed. Arrange on lettuce leaves and garnish 

with chopped beets. TVTr.r.TVT t^ ^ 

^^ Mrs. B. p. Monahan, Bridgeport, Conn. 

Savory Eggs 

Chop fine one small onion and one tomato. Cook in frying pan 
in small amount of fat until brown. Separate four eggs, add 
to the yolks one-half teaspoon salt, a dash of cayenne pepper, 
and two tablespoons cold water. Beat the whites lightly, mix 
with the yolks, add to the tomato in the frying pan and cook 
gently, as for scrambled eggs. Serve on buttered toast. 

Mrs. G. Nomdeden, Baltimore, Md. 

Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



52 



EGGS 



Spanish Eggs 

Cook six eggs until hard, remove shells, cut in halves lengthwise, 
take out and mash yolks smooth. Add three teaspoons melted 
butter, three Larkin Sardines rubbed to a paste, a dash of 
cayenne pepper, and one-half teaspoon salt. Mix and form 
into a ball and fill the hollow in each white. Have ready one 
cup cooked rice. Pile up in center of a platter, sink the eggs 
into the rice, and pour over the eggs and rice two cups seasoned 
cream sauce. Garnish with parsley, serve very hot. 

Mrs. J. Allison, Pearl River, N. Y. 

Delicate Eggs 

Lightly toast two slices of bread, spread with butter, trim off 
the crust. Beat the whites of two eggs until quite light, spread 
on the toasted bread, drop the yolks in the center, sprinkle with 
pepper and salt, bake until slightly brown in a medium oven. 

Mrs. E. Thomas, Houtzdale, Pa. 



Serve at once. 



Eggs with Tomato Sauce 

Put two tablespoons bacon fat into a frying pan. When melted 
add one small chopped onion. Cook until brown, then add 
one cup Larkin Tomatoes. Dilute two tablespoons flour with 
one cup water; add to above mixture. Season with one-half 
teaspoon salt, cook three minutes. Break four eggs into the 
sauce. Cook until set; serve on toast with the sauce poured 
around. jy^^g ^ DeScenza, Medford, Mass. 

Scalloped Eggs 

Boil six eggs twenty minutes, shell, cut in thin slices and place 

in baking dish a layer of eggs 
. \ then a layer of cracker-crumbs. 

\v^ /S^5^— ^ Sprinkle with pepper and dot 

rr-| lih/(^^) with butter. Continue this until 

eggs are all used. Pour over 
the whole one cup cream or rich 
milk. Bake twenty minutes. 

Mrs. Lenora Gant, 
Minneapolis, Kans. 





ACARONI AND 
CHEESE DISHES 




Macaroni is an excellent food, wholesome, delicious and 
digestible. Larkin Macaroni contains a large amount of nutri- 
ment in the form of starch, protein, and mineral matter, as only 
the best flour obtainable is used. 

It is thoroughly dried before packaging, so that there is prac- 
tically no loss in weight. It is truly an economical article of diet 
and can be prepared in a great variety of ways. This wholesome 
food should be found more often on our tables. 

If macaroni lacks flavor it is due to improper cooking. Follow 
directions given and so get best results. 

To Cook Macaroni 

Partly fill a large kettle with water, adding one teaspoon salt 
to each quart of water. When boiling, put in the macaroni and 
boil rapidly for twenty-five or thirty minutes. Stir occasionally 
with a spatula or wooden spoon, drain through a colander, rinse 
with cold water, drain again and it is ready for use. 

When Larkin Macaroni is cooked in this way it will be firm and 
white and have a delicious flavor. 

Macaroni may also be cooked in a double-boiler. Allow two 
■cups of boiling salted water to each cup of macaroni. It will 
take thirty minutes to cook. No starch is lost when this method 
is used, as all the water is absorbed by the macaroni. Cheese, 
tomatoes, milk and eggs all combine with macaroni to make 
'delicious dishes. It may also be served plain-boiled with a 
little butter, and used in place of potatoes with any meat. 

Larkin Kitchen. 
Custard Macaroni 

Cook one cup Larkin Short-Cut Macaroni in boiling salted 
water until tender. Drain. Beat two eggs, add one pint milk 
and three-fourths cup grated cheese, a sprinkling of pepper and 
a pinch of salt and soda. Put the Macaroni into a baking dish, 
add the cheese custard. Bake in a moderate oven for one-half 
hour or until set. Serve for supper, 

Mrs. J. Herbert Robinson, Washington, D. C. 

Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



S4 



MACARONI AND CHEESE DISHES 



Macaroni with Cheese 

Cook one-half package Larkin Short-Cut Macaroni in boiling 
salted water until tender. Drain. Put a layer in the bottom 
of a well-buttered baking dish, over this spread Larkin Cream 
Cheese cut in small pieces, add bits of butter and a sprinkling 
of Larkin Soda Cracker-crumbs, then more macaroni and so 
on, filling the dish. Pour over this one scant cup cream or 
milk. Scatter buttered crumbs over the top. Bake half an 
hour or until nicely browned on top. 

Mrs. Ernest C. Thurmond, Ash Grove, Mo. 

English Style Macaroni 

Cook one cup Larkin Short-Cut Macaroni in boiling salted 
water until tender. Rinse with cold water. Make a sauce 
by melting three tablespoons butter in a double-boiler. Add 
three tablespoons flour. When bubbling add one and one-half 
cups sweet milk. Stir constantly until thickened, add two- 
thirds cup grated cheese or four ounces cheese thinly sliced. 
Stir until melted. Add one-half teaspoon salt and a little pepper. 
Mix together sauce and Macaroni, reheat in kettle _ or put 
into baking dish and bake about twenty minutes until brown. 

Mrs. I. F. Knee, Omaha, Nebr. 

Italian Macaroni 

Cook one-half package Larkin Short-Cut Macaroni in boiling 
salted water. Season one pound chopped raw beef with salt, 
pepper, and Larkin Onion Extract and cook as Hamburg 
Steak. Slice one small onion and fry with the steak. Put 
the macaroni on the serving dish and the steak on top. Add 
a little flour to the fat in the frying pan and one-half can Larkin 
Tomatoes. Season with salt, pepper and one-half teaspoon 
sugar. When cooked pour the sauce over meat and serve at 
once. Grated cheese may be sprinkled on top. Place in oven 
until melted. These quantities will serve five people, 

Carrie Jordan, Belvidere, III. 

Macaroni with Meat 

Put one-half package Larkin Short-Cut Macaroni and one cup 
Larkin Egg Noodles into boiling salted water and cook until 
tender. Put one-fourth pound salt pork through Larkin Food- 
Chopper. Try out the pork in a spider, then add three sliced 
onions and one pound ground steak. Cook until brown. Drain 
Macaroni and Noodles, add to contents in spider, also one can 
Larkin Tomatoes, one teaspoon each of sugar and salt, one-fourth 
teaspoon white pepper. Cook forty-five minutes. No potatoes 
will be needed. ^^^ q^^ Southworth, Bridgewater, Mass. 

Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



MACARONI AND CHEESE DISHES 55 

Macaroni and Oysters 

Cook two cups Larkin Short-Cut Macaroni until tender and 
drain. Have ready one and one-half dozen fresh oysters. Put 
a layer of Macaroni in bottom of baking dish or casserole, then 
a layer of oysters and so on with Macaroni on top layer. Cover 
with a cream sauce made with two tablespoons melted butter, 
add two tablespoons flour; when bubbling add gradually one 
cup hot milk and the liquid from the oysters. Stir until boiling. 
Season with salt, pepper and a dash of cayenne pepper. Pour 
sauce over oysters and Macaroni and bake about one-half hour. 
Do not cook a moment longer than necessary or the oysters 
will become tough. Serve in baking dish. 

Mrs. Leighton, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Macaroni with Sauseige 

Cook one-half package Larkin Short-Cut Macaroni in boiling 
salted water fifteen minutes. Drain. Put Macaroni into a 
baking dish or casserole, add one pound pork sausage cut in 
two-inch pieces, one can Larkin Tomatoes, one-half teaspoon 
Larkin Celery Salt, one-fourth teaspoon white pepper, 
thoroughly mixed. Bake in hot oven for forty-five minutes. 

^ ' (No Name Given) Lowell, Mass. 

Macaroni and Salmon 

Cook one cup Larkin Short-Cut Macaroni in boiling salted 
water until tender. Drain. Open one can Larkin Salmon; 
break Salmon apart with fork. Make a cream sauce with two 
tablespoons butter, one tablespoon oil drained from Salmon, 
three tablespoons flour, and two cups milk. Arrange the 
Macaroni and Salmon in layers. Season Salmon lightly with 
cayenne pepper and salt. Pour sauce over each layer. Sprinkle 
buttered crumbs over the top. Bake in hot oven thirty 

Mrs. Arthur Holtom, Tiffin, Ohio. 

Nilson Macaroni 

Cook one-half package Larkin Short-Cut Macaroni in boiling 
salted water. Cut up three slices Larkin Bacon in small pieces, 
cook until crisp, add three or four onions thinly sliced and fry 
until brown; then add one can Larkin Tomatoes, one teaspoon 
salt, a pinch of soda and a little cayenne pepper. Mix with 
macaroni, put into a baking dish, bake in a hot oven for twenty 

Mrs. H. B. Von Nilson, Omaha, Nebr. 
Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



56 



MACARONI AND CHEESE DISHES 



Dried Beef with Macaroni 

Cook one cup Larkin Short-Cut Macaroni. Separate one- 
fourth pound dried beef. Put layers of beef and Macaroni 
into baking dish, cover with two cups seasoned cream sauce. 
Sprinkle buttered crumbs over the top and bake thirty minutes 
m a moderate oven. ^^^^ Walter Miller, Newark Valley, N. Y. 

Cheese Balls 

To two cups grated cheese, add one-fourth teaspoon salt, a 
few specks of cayenne pepper and the stiffly-beaten whites of 
three eggs, or sufficient of the egg-white to moisten the cheese. 
Form into balls, roll in bread-crumbs, fry in hot fat. Serve 
in nests of lettuce as a luncheon dish. The cheese may also be 
made softer with more egg and dropped on Larkin Saltines or 
rounds of thin toast and baked slowly until firm. 

Mrs. John H. Wells, Nashville, Tenn. 

Cheese Fondu 

Mix together one cup milk, one cup soft, fine bread-crumbs, 
one-half cup grated cheese. Add one lightly-beaten egg. 
Season with one-fourth teaspoon salt and a pinch of cayenne 
pepper. Put into a buttered baking dish, bake twenty minutes 
in moderate oven. Serve at once. 

Mrs. Karl E. Noyes, Salisbury, Vt. 

Cheese Puff 

Put one-half box Larkin Butter Crackers through a Larkin 
Food-Chopper with one-half pound cheese. If you have no 
dried crumbs put a crisp, brown bread-crust through also, but 
keep the bread-crumbs separate. Season mixture lightly with 
cayenne pepper and salt. Put into a buttered baking dish and 
pour in sufficient milk to come to the top of dish. Let stand 
for twenty minutes so the cracker-crumbs will absorb the milk. 
Sprinkle the bread-crumbs on top, dot with butter. Bake 
twenty minutes in a moderate oven. Serve immediately. This 
dish costs twenty cents and will serve six people. 

Mrs. Jno. Hyler, Plainfield, N. J. 

Welsh Rarebit 

One tablespoon butter, one teaspoon Larkin Corn Starch, one- 
half cup thin cream, one-half pound mild cheese, one-fourth 
teaspoon each of salt and Larkin Mustard, a few grains of 
Larkin Cayenne Pepper. Melt the butter, add corn starch, 
stir until well mixed, then add cream gradually and cook two 
minutes. Add cheese and stir until melted. Add seasonings. 
Serve on toasted bread or Larkin Crackers. 

Miss Maud E. Bryant, Haverhill, Mass. 

Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



MACARONI AND CHEESE DISHES 57 

Cheese Fingers 

Cut the crusts from thin sHces of bread. Spread a slice lightly 

with creamed butter, then a layer of cheese, slightly seasoned 

with Larkin Salt and Pepper; cover with a second slice of bread. 

Then cut into finger-lengths, about one inch wide, using a sharp 

knife. Place in shallow pan and brown in hot oven. Serve 

with soup or a green salad. , , a ^nr t- t^ 

^ ^ Mrs. Andrew Wilhelm, Easton, Pa. 

Southern Golden Fleece 

With a fork break up one-half pound Larkin Full-Cream Cheese. 
Put into a baking dish in a warm oven. When soft, add one 
cup cream and a sprinkling of Larkin Cayenne Pepper; blend 
thoroughly with a silver fork. Break over this five eggs, 
sprinkle with salt, cover with a plate, place in oven for a few 
minutes and when the whites begin to set beat briskly for 
several minutes, then put back in the oven and cook for three 
minutes. If properly cooked it will be light and fluffy like an 
omelet. Serve immediately it is done. Heat Larkin Butter 
Crackers in the oven and pass with this. Delicious as a supper 
dish for company. ^^^ ^^^^^ Prestegard, Pratt, Minn. 

Blushing Bunny 

Put into a Larkin Chafing Dish two tablespoons butter; when 
melted, add two tablespoons flour. Pour on gradually one cup 
thin cream or milk; when thickened add one-half can Larkin 
Tomato Soup and one cup macaroni which has been cooked 
in salted water; then add one-half pound cheese, grated or thinly 
sliced, and two eggs slightly beaten. Season with salt and a 
little Larkin Cayenne Pepper and Mustard. This is sufficient 
for a party of six girls and is delicious. 

Charlotte B. Richardson, Topeka, Kans, 





NDdR 




Bread Made with Compressed Yeast 

Sift together three quarts Larkin Bread Flour, add three tea- 
spoons Larkin Salt, add one cake compressed yeast softened 
in one-third cup of lukewarm water, and one quart cool boiled 
water. Mix thoroughly, sprinkle the bread-board with flour 
and turn dough onto it. Knead until dough ceases to stick 
and is smooth and elastic to the touch. Then put into bread- 
raiser and let raise. It will take about three hours. Divide 
into four parts, mold each into a loaf, place in bread-pans, cover 
with a clean cloth and let raise again until double in bulk. 
Bake forty-five minutes in a moderate oven. 

Mrs. M. Amorosa, Rockland, Mass. 

Bread with Potato Yeast 

To prepare Potato Yeast boil six potatoes, mash very fine or 
put through a potato ricer. Pour one quart boiling water 
over one quart flour. Add the potato, one cup sugar, two 
tablespoons salt, and when cool, three cakes dry yeast which 
has been softened in one cup lukewarm water. Mix thoroughly 
and stand aside in a fairly warm place for several hours. Use 
one cup yeast to a quart of liquid. If kept air-tight in a cool 
place it will keep good for three or four weeks. 

To make bread take one quart warm liquid, (milk or water), 
and one cup potato yeast. Stir in enough Larkin Flour to 
make a soft batter, set in a warm place to raise; when very 
light, add sufficient flour to make a stiff dough, knead very 
thoroughly, and place in four greased bread-pans. When 
light, bake in a moderate oven. 

Mrs. Daniel Wills y, Springfield, Mo. 

Crisp Bread without Baking Powder 

Sift one and one-half cups flour with one-half teaspoon salt. 
Chop or rub in one-half cup butter and lard mixed; add one 
tablespoon sugar. Mix with one cup sweet cream. Roll thin, 
lay in baking pan and score in strips about three-fourths of an 
inch wide. Bake in a hot oven. Serve with salad or coflfee. 

Mrs. Homer O. Hastings, Adena, Ohio. 



Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



BREAD AND ROLLS 



59 



Milk-and- Water Bread 

Put one tablespoon each of sugar, salt and lard into a quart 
measure, add two cups scalded milk, and two cups water. Mix 
thoroughly and pour into the Larkin Bread Maker, reserving 
sufficient to soften one cake dry yeast. When the yeast is 
quite soft, add to the liquid in the pan and sift in three quarts 
Larkin Bread Flour. Put in the kneading-rod and turn for 
three minutes. Cover and let raise over night. In the morn- 
ing if a very fine bread is desired, put in the kneading-rod and 
stir again for a few minutes. Allow to raise, divide in four 
portions, mold, place in greased bread-pans, let raise again, then 
bake forty-five minutes in a moderate oven. 

Mrs. Wm. G. Tribon, Sagamore, Mass. 

Old-Fashioned Bread 

Boil and drain sufficient potatoes to make one pint, mash 
thoroughly, scald one pint flour with the liquid in which pota- 
toes were boiled. Soften one cake dry yeast in one cup warm 
water, add three cups water, one tablespoon salt and one-half 
cup sugar to scalded flour. Beat thoroughly and allow to stand 
over night. In the morning, add flour to the batter and beat 
quite stiff with a wooden spoon. Let it raise, then add more 
flour, kneading the dough thoroughly. Again put to raise until 
double in bulk, divide into four portions, mold, place in greased 
bread-pans and, when quite light, bake in a moderate oven. 

Mrs. Thelma Miller, Osceola, Ind. 

Grziham Bread or Buns 

Scald one quart new milk, add one-half cup sugar, one-half 
cup Larkin Cooking Oil and one teaspoon salt; add one cake 
yeast softened in one-half cup warm water. Mix to a firm but 
soft dough, using equal parts of graham and white flour. Let 
the bread raise to double its bulk, cut off pieces of dough the 
size of a small egg, make into small flat cakes. Put into well- 
oiled pans two inches apart so they will not touch in raising. 
When quite light, bake in a hot oven. This may also be baked 
in loaves in the usual way. ^^^^ ^ ^ p^^^^ Brownell, Kans. 

Graham Loaf 

Mix together two cups Larkin Graham Flour, one cup bread 
flour, and one-half teaspoon salt. Put one teaspoon soda in one- 
half cup molasses, mix thoroughly, fill up the cup with sugar, 
add to the dry ingredients with one and one-half cups sweet 
milk. These quantities make one large loaf. Bake one hour in 
moderately hot oven. ^^^ ^^^ ^ Cossentine. Susquehanna. Pa. 

Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



60 



BREAD AND ROLLS 



Larkin Oatmeal Bread 

Put two cups Larkin Rolled Oats into bread-mixer, two tea- 
spoons salt, scant one-half cup Larkin Molasses, three table- 
spoons lard, add one quart boiling water. When cool add one 
yeast cake softened in one-half cup luke-warm water. Add two 
quarts sifted Larkin Bread Flour, stand aside to raise or leave 
over night. In the morning stir down, add more flour if neces- 
sary. It should be stiff enough for the spoon to stand upright. 
It is well not to knead the bread with the hands as it is better 
a little moist. Put into three greased bread-pans, raise one hour. 
Bake forty-five minutes in a moderate oven. Whole-wheat or 
graham flour may be used instead of white flour if preferred. 

Mrs. J. N. Jersey, Park Ridge, N. J. 

Raised Corn-Meal Bread 

Put one-half cup Larkin Yellow Corn-Meal into the bread bowl 
and pour over it one pint boiling water. Add one tablespoon 
Larkin Lard, one-half cup Larkin Molasses and one and one- 
half teaspoons Larkin Salt. Stand aside to cool. Soften one- 
half yeast cake in one-half cup warm water, add to mixture 
with enough Larkin Bread Flour to make a stiff dough. Knead 
well and set to raise. Next morning knead again and form 
into loaves; when quite light bake in a moderate oven. 

Mrs. LeRoy A. Grant, Roslindale, Mass. 

Southern Spoon Bread 

Heat one quart milk to boiling point, stir in two cups Larkin 
Corn-Meal and one teaspoon Larkin Salt ; add three tablespoons 
melted butter, and cook five minutes. Cool mixture. Separate 
three eggs, beat the yolks, add to the mixture, then fold in the 
stiffly-beaten whites. Pour into buttered baking dish or Larkin 
Casserole and bake in a moderate oven forty-five minutes. 
Serve while hot. This is especially good served with roast pork. 

Mrs. H. Viger, Clarendon, Pa, 

Boston Brown Bread 

Sift together one cup Larkin Bread Flour, two cups graham 
flour, two cups corn-meal, add one cup molasses, three and one- 
half cups thick sour milk, two teaspoons soda and one teaspoon 
salt. Mix thoroughly, divide into three molds and steam one 
and one-half hours. Sweet milk and baking powder may be 
used instead of sour milk and soda. This bread is much 
improved by standing in a hot oven about fifteen minutes after 
it is steamed, to dry out. ^^^^ ^ ^ Obendorf, Sterling. III. 

Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



BREAD AND ROLLS « 



Nut Bread 

Sift four cups flour with four teaspoons baking powder, one- 
half cup sugar, one teaspoon salt, add one cup chopped walnut 
meats, one egg lightly beaten, and one and one-half cups sweet 
milk. Put into two bread tins and stand aside to raise twenty 
minutes. Bake in a moderate oven forty minutes. Excellent 
for sandwiches. ^^^^ j^ L. Hull, Troy. N. Y. 

Raisin Nut Loaf 

Mix together one cup Larkin Graham Flour, one-half cup 
Larkin Bread Flour, one-half teaspoon salt, one-half cup sugar, 
and three tablespoons softened lard. Beat one egg light, put 
one teaspoon soda into one cup thick sour milk, add, with 
the egg, to dry ingredients, then stir in one-half cup each of 
chopped English walnut meats and raisins. Turn into greased 
bread-pan, stand aside thirty minutes before baking. Bake in 
a moderately hot oven forty-five minutes. 

Mrs. L. a. Minckler, Oshkosh, Wis. 

Corn-Meal Gems 

Sift together one-half cup Larkin Bread Flour and one cup 
Larkin Corn-Meal, two teaspoons Larkin Baking Powder, one- 
half teaspoon Larkin Salt, and one tablespoon sugar. Stir 
in one cup milk, one well-beaten egg, and two tablespoons 
melted butter or lard. Beat thoroughly and pour into greased 
muffin-pans. Bake in a quick oven about twenty minutes. 
Buttermilk or sour milk may be used with good results. 

Laura J. Sigman, Water Valley, Miss. 

Baking Powder Biscuits 

Sift together two cups Larkin Flour, one teaspoon salt and three 
teaspoons Larkin Baking Powder. Rub into the flour two 
tablespoons each of lard and butter. Mix to a soft dough 
with a three-fourths cup milk. Roll out one-half inch thick, 
cut into biscuits, place in a greased pan. Do not let biscuits 
touch. Brush tops with sweet milk, and bake from ten to 
fifteen minutes in a hot oven. ^^^^^^ g^^^^^^^ Westboro, N. Y. 

Cream Biscuits 

Sift together three times, four cups Larkin Bread Flour, four 
teaspoons Larkin Baking Powder, and one teaspoon Larkin 
Salt. Add one cup heavy sweet cream and one cup sweet milk 
or use enough coffee cream to mix. Roll lightly, cut in biscuits 
and bake in a quick oven. This rule also makes an excellent 
crust for chicken pie, very tender but not rich. 

Mrs. John H. Fitzpatrick, Old Chatham, N. Y. 

Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



62 



BREAD AND ROLLS 



Egg Biscuits 

Sift together two cups flour, two teaspoons baking powder, one- 
half teaspoon salt, one teaspoon sugar. Add one teaspoon 
melted butter to one-half cup milk and one egg beaten lightly. 
Mix with a spatula, handle as little as possible, roll and cut. 
Bake in a quick oven. ^^^^ ^^ S^^^^^^ Methuen, Mass. 

Shamrock Rolls 

Soften one-half cake compressed yeast in one-third cup luke- 
warm water. Cream together two teaspoons Larkin Sugar, 
one teaspoon Larkin Salt, and five tablespoons Larkin Lard; 
stir in one beaten egg, then add five cups Larkin Flour, one cup 
warm water, and the softened yeast. Beat thoroughly, cover 
and let raise. When set at night it is ready for mixing the next 
morning. When molding, allow a heaping teaspoon of dough 
for each roll. Do not knead the dough; simply cut it down 
with a knife and lightly form into balls. Brush each roll with 
butter, place in a flat pan, bake in a hot oven. If kept in the 
refrigerator, rolls may be made from dough three to five days 
after settmg. ^^^^ James R. Abercrombie, St. Joseph, Mo. 

Egg Rolls 

When the bread sponge is light, before you add flour to stiffen, 
take out two cupfuls and put into a mixing bowl. Pour two 
cups warm water or milk over one-half cup sugar, one teaspoon 
salt, and a two-thirds cup of lard, or part lard and part butter. 
Add this to the sponge with one quart of sifted flour and three 
lightly-beaten eggs. Stand aside until quite light, knead, roll 
out on a board, cut into shape; when light, brush over with 
white of egg, and bake in a hot oven fifteen or twenty minutes 
depending on the size. For a delicious sandwich split open and 
spread with Larkin Peanut Butter. 

Mrs. Jno. M. Ford, Lucas, Kans. 
Parker House Rolls 

Scald one pint milk and pour it over one tablespoon each of 
butter and lard, two tablespoons sugar and one teaspoon salt. 
Stir these until dissolved. When just warm, add one yeast 
cake previously softened in one cup lukewarm water. Add 
from seven to eight cups flour. Raise until double in bulk. 
Knead and roll out one-half inch thick, cut with large biscuit 
cutter, put a piece of butter size of a pea in center of one half 
and fold over. Place in greased pan allowing sul^cient space 
between rolls for them to raise without touching. Brush tops 
lightly with milk. Bake in a quick oven for twenty minutes. 
Mrs. Eben H. Anderson, Northampton, Mass. 

Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



BREAD AND ROLLS « 



Pop Overs 

Sift one cup Larkin Bread Flour with one teaspoon salt into a 
mixing bowl. Take one cup milk, add enough to the flour to mix 
smooth. Drop in one egg (unbeaten), beat for two minutes, add 
balance of milk. Pour into very hot buttered cups or gem pans, 
and bake from thirty-five to forty minutes in a moderately hot 
oven. Marian A. Davis, Westgrove, Pa. 

Egg Muffins 

Sift together two cups Larkin Bread Flour, one tablespoon 
sugar, two teaspoons baking powder, one-half teaspoon salt. 
Add one egg well beaten, one cup milk and one tablespoon 
melted butter. Beat rapidly until very light. Bake in greased 
muffin-pans in a hot oven. miss R. Jacobs, Pai.myra, Mo. 

Date Muffins 

Sift one-half cup each of Larkin Whole-Rye and Bread Flour 
with one-half teaspoon Larkin Salt and three teaspoons Larkin 
Baking Powder. Add one cup Larkin Graham Flour, two 
tablespoons Larkin Sugar, one egg beaten light and one cup 
milk. Stir in one-half cup chopped dates and one-half cup 
ground walnut meats. Bake in gem pans in a hot oven. 

Mrs. Arthur Felch, South Framingham, Mass. 

Rye Muffins without Shortening 

Sift together one cup each of Larkin Bread Flour and Whole- 
Rye Flour, one teaspoon Larkin Soda, one-half teaspoon Larkin 
Salt. Add one-half cup molasses and one cup sour milk. Have 
iron gem-pans very hot and bake in a quick oven. For richer 
muffins add one egg and four tablespoons of butter or lard. 

Mrs. Geo. W. Butts, Putnam, Conn. 

GrcJiEim Muffins 

Sift together one cup each Larkin Bread Flour, one cup Larkin 
Graham Flour, four teaspoons Larkin Baking Powder, one tea- 
spoon salt, and four tablespoons granulated sugar. Beat one egg 
light, add one cup milk and two tablespoons melted butter. 
Mix with dry ingredients, bake in hot oven in buttered gem- 
pans twenty-five minutes. mrs. Mary E. Tormey, Pine Park, N. Y. 

Bran Muffins 

Two cups bran, one cup Larkin Bread Flour, one-fourth tea- 
spoon Larkin Salt, one teaspoon Larkin Soda, one and one-half 
cups sour milk. Mix in order given. Will make one dozen 
muffins. Eat three each day, and keep the doctor away. 

Mrs. Marshall K. Olds, Surry, Maine. 

Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



64 



BREAD AND ROLLS 



Pumpernickel or Whole-Rye Muffins 

Sift together one and one-half cups each of Larkin Pumper- 
nickel and Bread Flour, three teaspoons Larkin Baking Powder, 
and one and one-half teaspoons Larkin Salt. Sift three times. 
Beat together two tablespoons cream (sweet or sour) and two 
tablespoons molasses and one-fourth teaspoon Larkin Soda. 
Add one and one-half cups sweet milk and the sifted dry 
ingredients. These quantities will make one dozen muffins. 
Bake in hot oven. lillie J. Babcock, Terryville, Conn. 

Scotch Scones 

Sift together twice, two cups pastry flour, one-half teaspoon 
soda. Rub in four tablespoons butter (or lard), add one table- 
spoon sugar and one-half cup currants. Mix rather stiff with 
one cup sour milk. Roll out round and about one-half inch 
thick, cut in four pieces pie-shape, brush over with milk and 
bake in a hot oven. Caraway seeds may be used in place of 
currants if preferred. ^^^^ ^ ^^^^^^^ Goodrich. Wis. 

Potato Scones 

Sift together one and one-half cups flour, one teaspoon salt, 
and two teaspoons baking powder. Rub in one-fourth cup 
butter, add one cup warm mashed potatoes. Mix to a soft 
dough with one egg and as much milk as necessary. Divide 
into three portions, roll into rounds one-half inch thick and 
cut each in four. Bake in a quick oven or on a griddle. Split, 
butter and serve hot. ^^^ ^^^^ Creighton. Lonaconing, Md. 

Plain Scones 

Mix and sift two cups Larkin Flour, two teaspoons Larkin 
Baking Powder, one-half teaspoon Larkin Salt, two teaspoons 
softened lard, stir in one well-beaten egg and one-half cup milk. 
Bake in oven or on hot griddle. To use part graham flour or oat- 
meal makes a pleasant variety. ^^^ ^_ ^^^^^^ Kewanee. III. 

Raised Coffee Cake 

Into Larkin Bread-Maker put one cup butter and lard mixed, 
and one cup sugar. Add one quart hot milk. When luke- 
warm, add two yeast cakes previously softened in warm water, 
also one pound cleaned currants, one and one-half teaspoons 
ground nutmeg, and three quarts flour. Put all into the mixer 
together, turn five minutes, put aside to raise; when light bake 
in three loaves. This cake is very fine for sweet sandwiches or 
church suppers. By omitting the currants and adding two 
eggs this recipe is excellent for doughnuts. 

Mrs. Henry Weed, Bethel, Conn. 

Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



BREAD AND ROLLS 65 



Bread or Coffee Cake 

Take one cup bread sponge raised with yeast, add one cup 
sugar, one egg, one cup butter and lard mixed, one teaspoon 
soda dissolved in one tablespoon lukewarm water, one teaspoon 
each of cinnamon, cloves and nutmeg, one cup seeded raisins 
chopped. Add enough flour to make a batter as stiff asfor 
fruit cake. Mix thoroughly. Put into a well-greased baking- 
pan, let raise and bake in a moderate oven. More fruit adds 
to the quality of the cake. It will make an excellent pudding 
cut in squares, steamed a few minutes and served with a good 
sauce. It is nearly as good as plum pudding and more easily 
digested. It also makes a good fruit cake by adding currants 
and citron and will keep fresh indefinitely if wrapped in Larkin 
Waxed Paper and kept in a Larkin Cake Box. 

Mrs, Wm. Wright, Howe, Ind. 

Dutch Apple Ccike 

Pour one cup scalded milk over one-third cup each of lard and 
granulated sugar; add one teaspoon salt. When lukewarm, 
add one yeast cake softened in one-half cup lukewarm water. 
Add two unbeaten eggs and three cups Larkin Bread Flour. 
Beat thoroughly with a wooden spoon, cover and set in a warm 
place to raise until it has doubled in bulk. Spread in two 
square greased pans, brush over with melted butter. Pare and 
core five apples, cut in eighths, press the sharp edges of the 
apples into the dough. Sprinkle with one-third cup granulated 
sugar mixed with one teaspoon Larkin Cinnamon and scatter 
over top two tablespoons Larkin Currants. Bake one-half hour 
or more in a hot oven. Cut in squares and serve hot with butter 
or sweetened and flavored whipped cream. Also good when 

^^- WiLBERTA MeRRELL BlISS, SHREWSBURY, MASS. 





Milk Toast 

Heat the milk, add butter and salt and pour over toasted bread, 
or make a thin cream sauce, pour it over the toast and serve 
hot. Make brown-bread milk toast in the same way. 

Larkin Kitchen. 

French Toast 

Beat two eggs slightly, add one-half teaspoon salt, and one 

cup milk; strain into shallow dish. Soak bread in mixture 

until soft. Cook on a hot, well-greased griddle; turn and 

brown on both sides. Serve for breakfast or luncheon, with 

a sauce or maple syrup. t t^ 

^ J ^ Larkin Kitchen. 

Sour Milk French Toast 

Slice stale bread one-half inch thick. Make a batter with one- 
half cup sour milk, one egg, one-half teaspoon Larkin Salt, 
one-half teaspoon Larkin Soda, one teaspoon sugar, add enough 
flour to make a thin batter. Dip each slice in the batter and 
brown in a skillet with part lard and part butter, or use pork fat. 

Miss Katharine Sellers, Greencastle, Ind. 

Sour Milk Griddle-Cakes 

Sift two and one-half cups Larkin Bread Flour, one-half tea- 
spoon Larkin Salt, one and one-quarter teaspoons Larkin Soda. 
Add two cups thick sour milk and one egg lightly beaten. Drop 
by spoonfuls on a hot greased griddle. When full of bubbles, 
turn and cook on the other side. Serve with butter and maple 

^ ^" Mrs. J. S. Mills, South Ashburnham, Mass. 



Griddle-Cakes 

Sift two cups flour, one-half teaspoon salt, and two teaspoons 

baking powder. Add gradually one cup water or milk. Cook 

as other griddle-cakes. »» t t- * t- ttt 

'^ Mrs. J. F. Alsip, Tacoma, Wash. 

Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



TOAST AND GRIDDLE-CAKES 67 

Bread-Crumb Griddle-Cakes 

Soak two cups stale bread-crumbs in cold water, squeeze out 
the water, add one cup flour and one pint thick sour milk. Let 
the mixture stand over night. In the morning add one egg 
beaten very light, one teaspoon each of salt and soda. Add 
more flour or liquid if necessary. Cook as other griddle-cakes. 
Mrs. Jno. N. Stukman, Fredericksburg, Va. 

Rye Griddle-Cakes 

Sift together one and one-half cups Larkin Whole-Rye Flour, two 
teaspoons baking powder, one-half teaspoon salt, one teaspoon 
sugar. Beat one egg light, add to it one and one-half cups 
mxlk, add gradually to the flour. Cook as other griddle-cakes. 
Serve with Larkin Honey or Maple Syrup. 

Mrs. a. J. Skellie, Little Rock, Ark. 

Corn-meal Griddle-Cakes 

Scald one cup corn-meal with one cup boiling water, beat until 
smooth, thin with one pint buttermilk, add one teaspoon salt, 
one egg beaten light, one teaspoon soda, and enough sifted flour 
to make a batter. Cook on hot greased griddle. If sweet milk, 

^ ^ ' Mrs. Irven Rystrom, Stromsburg, Nebr. 

Peanut Butter Griddle-Ccikes 

Sift together two cups flour, two teaspoons baking powder, one- 
half teaspoon salt. Add one egg and four tablespoons Larkin 
Peanut Butter. Beat vigorously, add two cups milk. Bake on 
a hot greased griddle. ^^^^ j^^ ^ ^^^^^ ^^^ ^^^^^ ^^^^ 

Buckwheat Cakes with Sour Milk 

Put into the sifter one and one-fourth cups buckwheat flour, 
one-fourth cup white flour, one teaspoon salt and one teaspoon 
each of baking powder and soda. Sift twice, put into the 
mixing bowl, add one egg beaten light and two and one-half 
cups thick sour milk. Bake on hot greased griddle, serve with 
honey or maple syrup. ^^^ q^^^^ Prestegard, Pratt, Minn. 

Buckwheat Cakes with Sweet Milk 

Sift together twice, one cup each of buckwheat and Larkin 
Whole-Wheat Flour, three teaspoons baking powder and one 
teaspoon salt. Add enough sweet milk or water to make a 
thin batter. Cook as other griddle-cakes. Serve at once with 
Larkin Corn Syrup. When using white flour allow one tea- 
spoon baking powder to one cup of flour. 

Mrs. L. Loeffler, Glendale, L. I., N. Y. 
Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



«s TOAST AND GRIDDLE-CAKES 

Waffles or Peincakes 

Sift one and three-fourths cups flour with two teaspoons baking 
powder and one-half teaspoon salt. Add one and one-half 
cups milk, the beaten yolks of two eggs and one tablespoon 
melted butter. Fold in last the stiffly-beaten whites of the 
eggs. If you make waffles quite often it is well to buy a small 
can such as is used for oiling sewing-machines, fill with Larkin 
Cooking Oil and keep for oiling waffle irons. 

Miss M. A. Kershner, Shoemakersville, Pa. 

Potato Pancake 

Pare and grate eight medium-sized potatoes, add one teaspoon 
salt, one well-beaten egg, and four tablespoons Larkin Bread 
Flour or sufflcient flour to make a fairly thick batter. Mix 
well, drop a spoonful at a time into a hot greased frying pan, 
cook slowly until a golden brown, turn and brown the other 
side. Serve with butter. Will serve six people. 

Mrs. Chas. F. Schaefer, Indianapolis, Ind. 

German Pancake 

Sift one-fourth cup flour with one-fourth teaspoon salt and 
one-half teaspoon baking powder. Beat two eggs quite light, 
add to them two cups milk. Mix gradually with the flour, 
pour into hot buttered iron pan. Lift the edges with a spatula 
so the batter may run underneath. If possible finish baking 
in hot oven. Roll up and turn out on a hot platter. Serve 
with lemon and sugar, or maple syrup. 

Mrs. J. H. Westman, Strawberry Ridge, Pa, 





There are two classes of cakes — sponge cake, in which no 
butter is used — and butter cakes. Sponge cake includes white, 
yellow and sunshine cake. Examples of butter cakes are: layer, 
cup, pound, etc. 

In making cakes use the best materials. Flour must be sifted 
before measuring. Pastry flour is preferred. If bread flour is 
used, sift two or three times before measuring. Never melt the 
butter, the bowl may be slightly warmed before the butter is 
creamed. Larkin Cooking Oil or part lard and part butter may 
be used with good results. 

Dried fruits should always be cleaned and well floured. Never 
wash currants just before using, or the mixture will be heavy. Add 
fruit at the last moment. If the fruit sinks to the bottom of the 
cake, the batter is too thin. 

In making cake follow this order, first, get out all necessary 
utensils and materials, then ingredients. If using a coal range, 
arrange the dampers so that the oven will be ready by the time 
the cake is mixed. Next prepare the pans, then mix the cake. 
For butter cakes, grease the pan with oil, lard or butter, and dredge 
slightly with flour. For large cakes, line the pan with paper. 

Larkin Kitchen. 

Cakes without Butter 

Sponge and Angel Food Cakes are raised by the air which is 
beaten into the whites of the eggs, and by slowly increasing heat 
of the oven. Care must be taken in combining the ingredients, 
not to stir the mixture or reverse the motion of beating or folding. 

The flour and sugar should be sifted several times before being 
measured. 

These cakes may be baked in ungreased pans if the pans are 
kept exclusively for them. The oven is right for these cakes when 
it turns a piece of white paper a light-brown in five minutes. 

Angel food and sponge cake should be placed in a very slow 
oven, increasing the heat as it bakes, browning at the last. 

Larkin Kitchen. 

Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



70 



CAKES AND FROSTINGS 



To Bake Cake 

The oven should not be as hot for cake as for bread. It is 
right for cake baked in loaves if it turns a piece of writing paper a 
light-brown in five minutes. For layer and small cakes it should 
be hotter. 

The time for baking a cake may be divided into four quarters: 
First quarter: The cake rises; little bubbles form on top. 
Second quarter: The cake continues to rise, and it browns 

in spots. 
Third quarter: The cake browns all over. 
Fourth quarter: The cake shrinks from the sides of the 
tin, becomes elastic to the touch, and stops singing. 
During the baking, the oven heat should be increased gradually 
but very slightly until the cake is brown, then it may be slightly 
reduced. On the average a thin loaf will bake in forty minutes, 
while a thick loaf should bake for at least an hour. Fruit cakes 
may require several hours. 

To turn cake out of the pan, loosen around the edges with a 
spatula and slip out on a wire cake-cooler or a clean towel or paper. 
If it sticks, turn it upside down, place damp cloth over the bottom 
of the pan and let it steam for a few minutes. Larkin Kitchen. 

Christmas or Wedding Cake 

One pound of butter, one pound brown sugar, ten eggs, six 
cups flour, one teaspoon each soda and ginger, one tablespoon 
each cloves and nutmeg, two tablespoons cinnamon. One pint 
blackberry jam or molasses, two pounds almonds, one pound 
citron, one pound dates, one pound figs, three pounds raisins, 
and one cup fruit juice, or brandy if you use it. The day before 
baking prepare the fruit, shell and blanch the almonds. The 
next morning beat the butter and sugar to a cream, add yolks 
of eggs beaten light. Then stir the soda into the molasses or 
jam and add next, then add the flour and spices sifted together 
and the fruit juice or brandy. Dredge the fruit well with flour, 
add to the mixture, then the almonds, and fold in last the whites 
of eggs beaten to a stiff froth. Line the pan with heavy well- 
greased paper. Have the citron sliced very thin, put a layer 
of cake batter, then a layer of citron, alternately until all is 
used. This cake fills a pan ten inches in diameter and five 
inches deep. It should be baked six or seven hours in a very 
moderate oven. This is a splendid cake and will keep for 
months. Half the quantities make a large cake. All Larkin 
material used except eggs. 

Ethel C. Dudderar, Gilberts Creek, Ky. 

Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



CAKES AND FROSTINGS 71 

Pennsylvania Fruit Cake 

Cream two-thirds cup lard or butter, add one cup sugar, and 
two eggs; beat quite light, add one cup molasses. Sift three 
and one-half cups flour with one and one-half teaspoons soda, 
one teaspoon each of salt and cloves, two teaspoons cinnamon 
and one-half teaspoon nutmeg. Sift three times. Add the 
sifted flour gradually with one cup strong coffee. Add one 
cup each of currants and raisins. These quantities make two 
loaf cakes. Bake in very moderate oven forty-five or sixty 
minutes. The cake is better if kept five weeks before cutting. 
All Larkin materials used except eggs. 

Mrs. Alice Pennay, Kingsley, Pa. 

Mother's Fruit Cake 

Stir one and one-half cups butter or three-fourths of a pound, 
with three cups brown sugar, until light and creamy. Add 
one-half a nutmeg grated, one teaspoon each cinnamon, cloves 
and mace. Dissolve one teaspoon soda in one-half cup sour 
cream, add to it one-half cup molasses and mix with the other 
ingredients. Add six eggs, beating each in separately. Sift 
four cups flour, add to cake mixture and one-half cup fruit 
juice, or brandy if you use it. Add one pound seeded raisins, 
one pound washed and dried currants, and one-half pound 
citron, orange and lemon peel mixed and shredded fine. Sprinkle 
the fruit with some of the flour and mix together well before 
adding to the cake. Beat or knead ten minutes then put into 
tins lined with greased paper. Place in moderate oven and 
bake slowly for three or four hours. These cakes improve 
with keepmg. ^^^ ^ ^ Laxton, Roanoke, Va. 

Layer Cake 

Cream one-half cup butter, add one cup sugar and mix very 
smooth. Sift two cups flour with two teaspoons baking powder 
and add to the sugar and butter alternately with one-half cup 
of milk mixed with two eggs beaten light. Add one-half tea- 
spoon of any Larkin Flavoring Extract. Bake in layers and 
put together with any frosting desired. 

Mrs. B. L. Tubman, Washington, D. C. 
Kentucky Layer Cake 

Cream one-half cup butter, add one cup sugar and two eggs; 
beat very light. Sift two cups flour with one-half teaspoon 
soda, add the flour and one-half cup of any home-made wine or 
Larkin Currant or Grape Jelly and one cup of seeded raisins. 
Bake in a square loaf or layer-cake pans. Good with or without 

^^'"^* Mrs. Albert Beaty, Oakville, Ky. 

Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



72 CAKES AND FROSTINGS 

Quick Creaim Cake without Shortening 

Sift three times, one and one-half cups flour with one-half 
teaspoon salt, one and one-half teaspoons baking powder and 
one cup sugar. Break two eggs into measuring cup, fill with 
sweet cream, add to the flour mixture with one-half teaspoon 
flavoring extract. Beat three minutes. Bake in layers or a 
loaf. If sour cream, use one-half teaspoon soda instead of 
bakmg powder. ^^^ ^^^^ j j^^uucett, North Pomfret, Vt. 

Cream Puffs 

Put one cup water and one-third cup butter into a sauce-pan. 
When it boils stir in one cup flour all at once and stir until it 
leaves the edge of the sauce-pan. Let the mixture cool, then 
add three eggs, one at a time and beat each one in well before 
adding another. Mix until smooth, drop by the spoonful on 
a buttered pan a little distance apart to allow for spreading. 
Bake thirty minutes in hot oven or until well done. If in doubt 
as to the cakes being done, take one from the oven, if it does 
not shrivel up in a few minutes, they are done. This makes 
fifteen small puffs. When cold fill with cream filling prepared 
as follows: 

One pint milk, four tablespoons corn starch, one teaspoon 
butter, three eggs, three-fourths cup sugar, one-fourth teaspoon 
salt, one-half teaspoon vanilla. Wet the corn starch with cold 
milk, scald the balance of the pint, add sugar and salt, cook 
five minutes. Beat the eggs, add two tablespoons of the corn 
starch mixture to them, then pour into the sauce-pan with the 
rest, and cook sev^eral minutes. Take from fire, add vanilla 
and butter. When cool fill the pufTs and serve. 

Mrs. R. H. Singer, North Brookfield, Mass. 

Pound Cake 

Cream one pound butter, add one pound white sugar, the yolks 
of nine eggs and beat until very light. Then add one pound 
flour (four cups) sifted with one teaspoon baking powder. Add 
one tablespoon lemon juice and one-half teaspoon mace if the 
flavor is liked. Beat the whites of eggs quite stift", gradually 
add them with the flour. Bake in a large pan lined with waxed 
paper in a very moderate oven (see rules for baking). 

If you wish a fruit cake add two teaspoons Larkin Allspice 
and a quarter pound each of Larkin Raisins, Currants, Dates 
and mixed peel. This cake is much better if kept several weeks 

^* Mrs. W. S. Shiflet, Harrisonburg, Va. 

Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



CAKES AND FROSTINGS 



73 



Sponge Cake 

Six eggs, one cup sugar, one tablespoon lemon juice, grated rind 
of one lemon, one cup flour, one-fourth teaspoon salt. Beat 
yolks until thick and lemon-colored, add sugar gradually and 
continue beating. Add rind and juice of lemon and the 
whites beaten stiff and dry. Beat with egg-beater until well 
blended. Remove beater and carefully cut and fold in the 
flour and salt sifted together. Do not stir this cake as it would 
take away the lightness. Bake fifty to sixty minutes in a slow 
oven. Invert pan while cake cools. 

Miss Bessie Renfrew, Lenox, Mass. 

Four-Egg Sponge Cake 

Four eggs, one cup sugar, four tablespoons cold water, one cup 
flour sifted with one teaspoon baking powder. One-half tea- 
spoon flavoring extract. Beat yolks of eggs, add the sugar, 
then the cold water and the sifted flour, then the extract. 
Fold in the beaten whites of eggs. Bake in a moderate oven 
forty-five minutes. j^^ss ^ Rqmmel, Elizabeth, N. J. 

Moleisses Layer Cake 

One-half cup Larkin Lard, one and one-half cups Larkin 
Molasses, one egg, one-half cup thick cream (sweet or sour), 
three cups flour sifted three times with one teaspoon each of 
Larkin Soda and Baking Powder, and two teaspoons ginger. 
Cream the lard, add the molasses, the egg and sifted flour and 
milk. Beat briskly for two minutes. Put into three layer- 
cake pans or into a loaf-pan. Bake in a moderate oven. 

Dr. Edith K. Neel, Santa Rosa, Fla. 

Corn StcUfch Cake 

Cream one cup butter, add two cups powdered sugar, one cup 
milk and one teaspoon flavoring extract. Sift together two 
cups flour, one cup corn starch, two teaspoons baking powder, 
one-half teaspoon salt. Fold in stiffly-beaten whites of six 
eggs. Place in a greased cake-pan. Bake in a moderate oven 
forty-five minutes. Cover with cocoanut icing. 

Mrs. Andrew Wii.helm, Easton, Pa. 

Gold Ccike 

Cream one-half cup butter, add one cup sugar, mix thoroughly 
then add the yolks of four eggs. Sift two cups flour with two 
teaspoons of baking powder and one-half teaspoon salt. Add 
gradually to the butter and sugar with one-half cup milk and 
one-half teaspoon any Larkin Flavoring Extract desired. Bake 
in tube pan about thirty minutes in moderate oven. 

Mrs. G. Reubens, Pearl River, N. Y. 



Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



74 CAKES AND FROSTINGS 

Father's Coffee Cake 

C(X)k together for five minutes one cup sugar, one cup coffee, 
two tablespoons cocoa. While this is cooHng, cream one-half 
cup butter, add one cup sugar, two eggs, then add one cup 
cold coffee. Sift together two cups flour, one teaspoon soda, 
one teaspoon baking powder and add to the other ingredients. 
Stir in the cool cooked mixture and bake in a loaf. The batter 
will not be very thick but do not add more flour. Cover with 
white icmg. ^^^ j ^ ^^^^ Angus, Nebb. 

English Jcim Cake 

Cream three-fourths cup butter in a mixing bowl. Add one 
cup sugar and three eggs beaten in singly. Sift together two 
cups Larkin Pastry Flour, one teaspoon each Larkin Soda, 
Cinnamon and Nutmeg, sift three times, add one-half cup 
milk or water and one-half cup Larkin Raspberry Jam. Put 
into a long, narrow pan ; bake in a very moderate oven forty-five 
minutes. This also makes an excellent dessert if cut in small 
rounds or squares and covered with whipped cream. Decorate 
with pecans or English walnuts. ^^^ ^^^^^ g^^^^^ Oakville. Ky. 

Chocolate Cream Cakes 

Beat one egg light in the mixing bowl, add one cup sugar and 
one cup cream, sweet or sour. Sift together one cup flour 
and five tablespoons Larkin Cocoa with one teaspoon Larkin 
Soda; add sufficient flour to thicken. Flavor with Larkin 
Vanilla Extract, bake in gem- or layer-cake pans twenty minutes. 
Serve hot or cold. ^^ ^^ ^ England, Van Meter, Iowa. 

Cocoa Tea Cakes 

Cream one-third cup butter with one cup sugar. Beat in 
singly, three eggs, add one-half cup each of Larkin Corn Starch 
and flour sifted with one-fourth cup cocoa, one teaspoon baking 
powder and one-fourth teaspoon salt. Add one-half teaspoon 
vanilla or lemon extract. Put in muffin-pans and bake in 
moderate oven twenty minutes. Delicious. May also be baked 
m layers. L. j. Sigman. Water Valley, Miss. 

Ice-Cream Cake 

Make a good sponge cake, bake half an inch thick in layer-cake 
pans. When quite cold, take a pint of thick sweet cream, beat 
until it looks like ice-cream, sweeten and flavor with Larkin 
Vanilla. Blanch and chop one-half pound almonds, stir into 
cream and spread thickly between layers. This is the queen 
of all cakes. ^^^^ j^^^^ Riggin, Crisfield, Md. 

Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



CAKES AND FROSTINGS 7s 

Watermelon Cake 

For the white part use four tablespoons butter, one-half cup 
sugar, one-third cup milk, one and one-half cups flour, one 
and one-half teaspoons baking powder, whites of two eggs 
beaten light and one-half teaspoon almond extract. For the 
pink part use the same quantities, taking two yolks of eggs and 
one-half teaspoon vanilla extract and sufficient Larkin Cherry- 
Red Culinary Paste to make a pretty pink color, add one-half 
cup raisins. Line a long narrow pan with waxed paper and pour 
the first mixture into it, and the pink over that. Bake as layer 
cake. When cool make a white icing and color it a pale green 
with Larkin Apple-Green Culinary Paste. Cut in strips to 

serve. Mrs. J. H. Stockmann, Fredricksburg, Va. 

Fourth-of-July Cake 

Use the same recipe as given for watermelon cake, leaving out 
the raisins in pink part. For a third or blue part, use one- 
fourth cup butter, one-half cup sugar, one cup flour, one tea- 
spoon baking powder and one egg. Use juice from canned 
blueberries or logan berries to mix. Put together with white 
icing, having red cake at the bottom, then white layer, and 
blue on top. Decorate with tiny flags. Parkin Kitchen. 

Potato Cake 

Put into a Larkin Cake-Maker, two-thirds cup butter with two 
cups sugar and three eggs. Sift together two and one-half 
cups flour with one teaspoon ground cinnamon, half a teaspoon 
ground nutmeg, two teaspoons baking powder. Sift three 
times, add the flour and one cup hot mashed potato, two squares 
(or ounces) of Larkin Unsweetened Chocolate which has been 
melted over hot water, one-half cup milk, three yolks and two 
whites of eggs, one teaspoon Larkin Vanilla Extract and one 
cup of chopped walnuts. Stir for five minutes, put into a 
greased square cake-pan, bake in a moderate oven forty-five 
minutes. Delicious as a dessert with whipped cream. 

Mrs. Chas. W. Hamilton, East St. Louis, III. 

Milkless, Eggless, Butterless Cake 

Boil together three minutes, one cup brown sugar, one cup 
water, one-third cup lard or cooking oil, one cup Larkin Seeded 
Raisins, one-half teaspoon nutmeg and one teaspoon cinnamon. 
When thoroughly cool, add two cups flour sifted with one-half 
teaspoon each of baking powder, soda and salt. Bake in a 
square pan in a moderate oven thirty-five minutes. One-half 
cup nut meats may be added if a richer cake is desired. 

Mrs. Edwin W. Fishburn, Denver, Colo. 

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76 



CAKES AND FROSTINGS 



Chocolate Nut Cake 

Put into a double-boiler, two ounces unsweetened chocolate, 
one-half cup brown sugar, one-half cup cold water and the yolk 
of one egg. Cook until thick, then add one teaspoon vanilla 
extract and one cup chopped nuts — pecans or walnuts. Set 
aside to cool. Cream two-thirds cup butter or other shortening, 
add one cup brown sugar and two eggs beaten light. Dissolve 
one teaspoon soda in one-half cup sour milk; add with two cups 
flour. Fold in chocolate mixture and bake in loaf or layers. 
Cover with white frosting. ^^^^ j^^^^^ Kilbourn. Wis. 

Rich Chocolate Cake 

Cream one cup butter, add two cups sugar and mix quite smooth. 
Add the beaten yolks of five eggs, one cup sour milk, one tea- 
spoon soda dissolved in a tablespoon of hot water and one-half 
cake or four ounces Larkin Chocolate melted over hot water. 
Stir all together then add two and one-half cups flour. Fold 
in last the stiffly-beaten whites of two eggs. Bake in layers or 
a long shallow pan. If a layer cake, cut up Larkin Marsh- 
mallows in small pieces and put between the two cakes while 
still hot. Cover with white frosting. This will keep a week. 

M. C. ToppAN, Hampton, N. H. 

New Orleans Cakes 

One cup Larkin Molasses, two cups Larkin Light Yellow Sugar, 
one-half cup softened lard, one teaspoon Larkin Soda, one 
teaspoon salt, one teaspoon ginger, two teaspoons cinnamon 
and one cup hot water. Use enough flour to make a soft cake 
or hard gingerbread, or use more flour and make drop or rolled- 
out cookies. You can stir this up and bake a cake for tea 
(make the consistency of layer cake). Then the next day add 
more flour to what was left and bake a pan of dropped cookies 
or make a steamed pudding and serve with sweet sauce. 

Mrs. a. J. Skellie, Little Rock, Ark. 

Pork Cake 

Put one pound fat salt pork through Larkin Food-Chopper, 
pour over pork two cups boiling coffee or water. Put one 
pound Larkin Raisins and one-fourth pound citron peel through 
food-chopper using coarse knife, add to pork with one cup 
currants, two cups brown sugar. Stir one teaspoon soda into 
one cup molasses. Sift six cups flour with two teaspoons each 
of cloves and cinnamon and one teaspoon salt. Add one more 
cup flour if necessary. Bake in four loaves in one-pound bread- 
pans. If wrapped in waxed paper and put into stone jar, it 
will keep for months. ^^^ leRoy Stephenson, Madison, Wis. 

Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



CAKES AND FROSTINGS n 

Apple Sauce Birthday Ccike 

Put through the food-chopper (using coarse knife), one-fourth 
pound each of citron, candied lemon and orange peel, also one 
pound raisins. Sift together, four cups flour, two teaspoons 
each nutmeg, cinnamon and cloves, and one teaspoon each of 
soda and salt. Cream together, one cup butter and two cups 
brown sugar. Add all ingredients with two and one-half cups 
unsweetened apple sauce. Line cake-pan with waxed paper 
and bake in slow oven for one and one-quarter hours. Will 
keep fresh six weeks or more if tightly covered. 

Mrs. W. VVaigel, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Eggless Apple Sauce Cake 

Cream one-half cup butter or other shortening, add one cup 
brown sugar. Sift one and one-half cups flour with one tea- 
spoon each of soda, salt, cinnamon, cloves and cocoa. Mix 
with one cup unsweetened apple sauce; bake in moderate 
oven forty-five minutes. One cup of raisins may be added to this. 

Mrs. Harry Bunn, Schenectady, N. Y. 

Spice Cake 

Cream one cup lard, add one cup each of sugar, molasses and 
thick sour milk, four cups flour sifted three times with two 
teaspoons soda and one teaspoon each cinnamon and nutmeg. 
Add two teaspoons vinegar, bake in square pan in moderate 
oven thirty-five minutes. Ice with caramel or white frosting. 

Mrs. J. E. Blake, Marble Rock, Iowa. 

Rich Spice Cakes 

Two cups brown sugar, one cup lard and butter mixed, three 
eggs, one cup sour milk. Sift three and one-half cups flour 
with one teaspoon each Larkin Salt, Soda, Cinnamon, Nutmeg, 
Allspice and Cloves. Add one pound chopped raisins and one- 
half pound walnut meats. Take a spoonful of the mixture, 
roll in sugar, place on pans one inch apart, raise twenty minutes 
and bake. This may be baked in a loaf and will keep moist 
for weeks. Wrap in waxed paper before putting away. 

Mrs. Ida Fetterman, Punxsutawney, Pa. 

French Pastry 

Cut a sheet of sponge cake into small rounds; dip in chocolate 

frosting. While this is still moist lay split blanched almonds 

cut in halves around each little cake like daisy petals. In the 

center drop the daisy heart made of fondant, colored yellow. 

Or you may use white fondant and split almonds which have 

been delicately browned in the oven, making the marguerite 

heart of chocolate. n i t u r. tvt w 

Mrs. John Hauser, Rochester, N. Y. 

Use Level Aleasuremerds Only. See Page 6. 



78 



CAKES AND FROSTINGS 



Angel Food 

Whites of eight eggs, one teaspoon cream of tartar, one cup 
sugar, three-fourths cup Larkin Pastry Flour, one-fourth tea- 
spoon salt, three-fourths teaspoon vanilla. Beat egg whites 
until frothy, add cream of tartar and beat until they are stiff; 
add sugar gradually. Mix flour and salt and sift four times, 
fold into the eggs and sugar and add vanilla. Bake in an 
unbuttered tube pan forty to fifty minutes. 

Mrs. Albert Carpenter, Gulderland, N. Y. 

Cocoa Angel Cake 

Beat whites of five eggs until foamy, add one-half teaspoon 
cream of tartar and beat until dry. Sift together, one cup 
sugar and one-fourth cup cocoa with one-half cup Larkin 
Pastry Flour. Fold into eggs and flavor with one-half teaspoon 
vanilla. Bake one-half hour in a tube pan. When cold cover 
with a thin boiled icing. ^^^ j^^^ Denker, Lakefield. Minn. 

Cocoanut Macaroons 

Beat the whites of three eggs until stiff, gradually add one-half 
pound Larkin Powdered Sugar (or one and one-fourth cups), 
one-half package Larkin Cocoanut, one-half teaspoon Larkin 
Almond Extract. Mix gently together, drop from a teaspoon 
about one inch apart on Larkin Waxed Paper. Bake in a 
moderate oven about twenty minutes. When cool brush the 
under side of paper with water and remove cakes. This recipe 
makes three dozen delicious macaroons. 

Mrs. G. a. Randall, Providence, R. I. 
Marguerites 

Beat the whites of three eggs until stiff; add gradually six 
tablespoons powdered sugar, one-half teaspoon Larkin Vanilla 
and five tablespoons chopped nuts. Drop with a teaspoon on 
buttered pans; bake in moderate oven until golden brown or 
spread over Larkin Saltines and brown lightly in a slow oven. 

Mary E. Raymond, Wayne, Mich. 

Cococinut Marguerites 

Boil one cup sugar with one-half cup water until it spins a thread, 
drop in six marshmallows cut in small pieces. Pour the mix- 
ture gradually upon the whites of two eggs which have been 
beaten dry, add one-half cup cocoanut and when cool, one-half 
teaspoon vanilla and one-half cup chopped nut meats. Tint 
with Larkin Cherry-Red Culinary Paste, spread on crackers and 
bake in moderate oven until slightly brown. Very pretty for a 
luncheon. j^^^ YVm. McAlpin, Jamestown, N. Y. 

Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



CAKES AND FROSTINGS 



79 



Jelly Roll 

Beat three eggs very light. Add one cup of sugar gradually. 
Sift one cup flour with one teaspoon baking powder and one- 
fourth teaspoon salt, add two tablespoons milk and mix lightly 
but thoroughly. Line the bottom and sides of pan with waxed 
paper. Cover bottom of pan with mixture and spread evenly. 
Bake twelve minutes in a moderate oven. Take from oven 
and turn onto a paper sprinkled with powdered sugar. Quickly 
remove paper and cut off a thin strip from sides and ends of 
cake. Spread with jelly or jam which has been beaten to 
consistency to spread easily, then roll. After cake has been 
rolled, roll waxed paper around it to keep it in shape. The work 
must be done quickly, or cake will crack in rolling. 

Mrs. R. Helm, Mt. Vernon, III. 
Madeira Cake 

Cream one cup butter, add two and one-half cups sugar, yolks 
of three eggs; beat quite light. Sift four cups flour with one- 
half teaspoon soda, add the grated rinds of two lemons. Take 
care not to grate any of the white pith, only the yellow rind 
should be used. Add the strained juice of the lemons and 
two-thirds cup of milk, or water. Fold in the stififly-beaten 
egg whites. Bake in a large round cake-pan in a medium oven, 
one hour. When cake has baked twenty minutes put two long 
thin slices of citron peel across the top. 

Mrs. C. p. Deane, Alberene, Va. 

Rich Blackberry Cake 

One cup butter, two cups sugar, five eggs. Sift together three 
times, four cups flour, one teaspoon soda, two teaspoons each 
of baking powder and cinnamon, one teaspoon allspice, one-half 
teaspoon nutmeg. Cream the butter, add the sugar; beat in 
one egg at a time until you have three, then add some sifted 
flour and more eggs until you have five. Add the flour, one 
cup of thick sour milk, and one cup canned blackberries or 
blackberry jam. Bake in round cake-pans with a funnel or 
in small bread-pans for forty-five minutes. See directions for 
baking fruit cake. This cake tastes the best when kept five 
weeks before being cut. ^iss Ada C. Mitzel. Bethany. Ohio. 

Crumb Cake 

Two and one-half cups flour, one and one-half cups brown 
sugar, one-half cup butter. Mix together the same as pie- 
crust. Take out one cup crumbs, then add one cup sour milk, 
and one teaspoon soda. Put in greased meat-pan, sprinkle 
the crumbs over the top and bake in a moderate oven. 

Mrs. John Brady, Kent, Ohio. 
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80 



CAKES AND FROSTINGS 



FROSTINGS AND FILLINGS 

Chocolate Filling No. 1 

One-half cake Larkin Unsweetened Chocolate, one-half cup 
sweet cream, one and one-half cups granulated sugar. Boil 
together about five minutes. Beat until cool. Then add one 
teaspoon Larkin Vanilla Extract, spread thickly between layers 
and on top. Mrs. C. C. Lyons, Hale, Mo. 

Chocolate Filling No. 2 

Take one-half package of Larkin Prepared Chocolate Pudding 
and make according to directions with two cups of milk. Put 
between and on top of layer cake. Cover with whipped cream 
or plain white frosting. This is delicious and inexpensive and 
makes a large cake. -^^^ jyi Amorosa, Rockland, Mass. 

Chocolate Frosting 

Melt one and one-half ounces Larkin Unsweetened Chocolate 
over hot water. Then add one-fourth cup scalded cream, a 
pinch of Larkin Salt, one egg yolk, one tablespoon butter, one- 
half teaspoon Larkin Vanilla. Stir in powdered sugar to make 
right consistency to spread. A pleasant change when whip- 
ping cream for cake is to put in two dessert-spoons of Larkin 
Cocoa before you begin to whip. Add sugar and vanilla and 
you have a delicious frosting, mrs. C. G. Penniman. Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Fruit Filling 

One-half cup mashed strawberries (raspberries or peaches may 
be used), one cup powdered sugar, white of one egg. Put all 
together and beat briskly until stiff enough to stay on layer 
^^^^- Mrs. Frank S. Merrill, Bristol, Conn. 

Rich Cocoanut Frosting 

Take two cups whipped cream, two cups Larkin Cocoanut, 
juice of one orange or one teaspoon Larkin Lemon or Orange 
Extract, one-half cup powdered sugar. Mix lightly but thor- 
oughly; spread between and on cake. 

Mrs. James A. TenEyck, Pluckemin, N. J. 

Minnehaha Filling 

Chop one cup raisins, one cup English walnuts; add one cup 
grated cocoanut; mix together; boil one cup granulated sugar 
and six tablespoons water until it threads; pour while hot over 
the fruit and nuts. Spread between layers; put cocoanut on 
top of cake. Hattie Osborn, Boring, Md. 

Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



CAKES AND FROSTINGS 



81 



Mocha Frosting 

One cup powdered sugar, three tablespoons butter, one table- 
spoon milk, one tablespoon strong coffee, one-fourth teaspoon 
vanilla extract. Mix well with spoon, then beat light with 
Sliver fork. ^^^ ^^^^ ^ Gurney, North Attleboro, Mass. 

Lemon Filling 

Put three-fourths cup Larkin Granulated Sugar, one tablespoon 
cold water, one beaten egg, juice and grated rind of one lemon 
into a double sauce-pan. Stir until it thickens. Delicious. 

Mrs. James A. Sipes, Detroit, Mich. 

Lemon Icing 

Put one and one-half tablespoons butter into a basin, melt 
over hot water, add one tablespoon cream or evaporated milk, 
one-half teaspoon lemon extract and sufificient powdered sugar 
to spread. -^^^^ ^ -^ Poppe, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Boiled Icing 

Put one cup of Larkin Granulated Sugar with one-fourth cup 
of water; add a pinch of cream of tartar. Stir until the sugar 
is dissolved; then let it boil until, when tried with a fork, the 
syrup will end in a fine thread-like stream. Remove immedi- 
ately from the fire and pour slowly over the stififly-beaten whites 
of two eggs. Add one-half teaspoon of any Larkin Extract. 
Beat until the icing is cool; spread at once. 

Mrs. Benjamin H. Miller, Columbia City, Inb. 

Raisin Filling 

Take one-half package Larkin Raisins and stew until tender; 
cool and drain off the water. Mash with a potato masher 
(do not chop them), add two-thirds cup powdered sugar and 
one-third box Larkin Shredded Cocoanut. If this is a little 
dry add a very little milk, spread between and on top of cake. 
It is delicious. This is enough for a three-layer cake. 

Mrs. Clyde Croman, Marion, Ohio. 

Marshmallow Filling and Frosting 

Take one-half pound marshmallows ; reserve sufficient whole 
marshmallows for top of cake; cut remainder into small pieces. 
Cook one and one-half cups sugar with one-third cup water 
until it hairs. Have ready two whites of eggs whipped to a 
froth; add the syrup; then put in cut marshmallows. Spread 
upon both layers of cake. Put a little hot water into bowl, 
dip one side of marshmallow and put on top layer of cake as 
quickly as possible. ^^^ Walter R. Herbert, Bedford, Iowa. 

Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



82 



CAKES AND FROSTINGS 



Mock Marshmallow Frosting 

Soften two tablespoons Larkin Gelatine in six tablespoons cold 
water. Put over hot water to melt. Boil two cups Larkin 
Granulated Sugar with one-half cup water until it will thread, 
pour into the gelatine, flavor with Larkin Vanilla Extract and 
beat until thick and white. Nuts are a fine addition. 

Florence E. Titus, Brattleboro, Vt. 

Caramel Frosting 

One cup brown sugar, one-fourth cup boiling water, white of 
one egg. Take one-fourth of the sugar and put into a small 
sauce-pan and brown over the fire. Then add the boiling water 
and the rest of the sugar. Boil until it falls in a heavy thread 
from the spoon. Pour it slowly onto the beaten white of one 
egg, beating all the time. Beat until it is cool and thick; spread 
between layers and on top of cake. 

Mrs. William Connelly, Fall River, Mass. 

Melba Cake Filling 

Boil together for five minutes, one cup milk, one and one-half 
pounds Larkin Brown Sugar and one jar Larkin Peanut Butter. 
Then add one-fourth cup each of walnuts, almonds and hazel- 
nuts coarsely chopped, to the boiling syrup, beat until thick, 
put in jelly glasses and seal up. This will keep a long while. 
When ready to use add whipped cream to spread. 

Mrs. p. Coleman, Castleton, Kans. 

Cream Frosting 

Beat whites of two eggs until light but not stiff, add gradually 
five tablespoons of granulated sugar. Put over hot water and 
steam ten minutes. Flavor with Larkin Vanilla. Beat until 
cold. This is almost like whipped cream. 

Mrs. F. J. Terpenning, Newark Valley, N. Y. 

Orcmge Icing 

Strain the juice of two oranges — add enough Larkin Powdered 
Sugar to spread easily. Color with Larkin Yellow Culinary 
Paste and flavor delicately with Larkin Lemon Extract. This 
is delicious and quite a help during the hot summer months, 
when you don't care to cook icings. 

Mrs. Henry Davis, New Decatur, Ala. 

Hot Water Frosting 

Put two tablespoons boiling water into a bowl; add powdered 
sugar and three tablespoons Larkin Cocoa to make it the right 
consistency to spread; add one teaspoon melted butter; flavor 
with Larkin Vanilla. ^^^ Carrie K. Baker, Brewer, Maine. 



Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



CAKES AND FROSTINGS 



83 



Maple Icing 

Moisten one cup powdered sugar, with strong coffee so that it 
will spread. Flavor with one teaspoon of Larkin Maple Flavor 
Imitation Extract. This makes a delicious and quick icing. 

Mrs. Frank Boninie, Monessen, Pa. 

Vinegar Frosting 

One cup brown sugar, one cup white sugar, ten tablespoons 

water, two tablespoons vinegar, cream of tartar the size of a 

pea; boil all together until a little dropped into cold water can 

be gathered into a ball; pour slowly over the well-beaten white 

of one egg; beat until stiff. Flavor with one teaspoon Larkin 

Vanilla Extract. This icing never gets hard. Spread between 

the layers of cake and on top. ,/r r> \r r> \r ^t t 

^ ^ Mrs. R. V. Buckage, Vincentown, N. J. 

Fig Filling 

Chop three-fourths pound of Larkin Sun-Dried Figs; add 
three-fourths cup Larkin Sugar, juice of one-half lemon; stew 
together until soft and smooth, and spread between layers. 

Mrs. Everett B. Curtis, North Bend, Oregon. 

Pineapple Filling 

Empty a can of shredded pineapple into sauce-pan and bring 
to a boil; thicken with two tablespoons Larkin Corn Starch, 
boil a few minutes and let cool ; then spread between the layers. 
A chocolate frosting is excellent on this cake. 

Mrs. a. J. Lawall, Newark, N. J. 




GINGERBREADSXOOIP 

iO^NUTS^ 


lES AND 


a ^ IHI^^m-H^ <f.^7v^ 



Hot Water Gingerbread 

Mix together one cup molasses, one-half cup sugar, one-third 
cup butter or lard. Sift two and one-half cups flour with two 
teaspoons soda, one tablespoon ginger, one-half teaspoon each 
cloves and cinnamon, one-half teaspoon salt. Stir together well 
with one cup boiling water, hastily stir in two well-beaten 
eggs. This is very thin but do not add more flour. May be 
baked in gem-pans, or layers. If Larkin Waxed Paper is cut 
to fit the bottom of the cake tins after they are greased, the cake 
will not stick. As this is a very soft cake, let it cool before 
removing from pans. Cover with plain white frosting. Will 
remain moist two weeks. ^rs. Elmer H. Crisler, Clyde. N. Y. 

Sour Milk Gingerbread 

Mix one-fourth cup Larkin Cooking Oil or Lard v/ith one cup 
sugar and one ^%g. Beat very light. Add one-half cup molas- 
ses. Sift two teaspoons Larkin Ginger, one teaspoon Larkin 
Cinnamon, one-fourth teaspoon salt, and one-half teaspoon 
soda with one and three-fourths cups flour. Add flour alter- 
nately with one-half cup sour milk. Pour into greased pans 
and bake in moderate oven thirty to forty minutes. 

r-i 1 /-,. I 1 Mrs. J. ScANLON, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Eggless (jingerbread 

Cream one-half cup butter or lard, with one cup brown sugar, 
add one-half cup milk. Sift together two cups flour, two tea- 
spoons baking powder, and one and one-half teaspoons ginger. 
Add to the first mixture with one-half cup milk. Spread thinly 
with a spatula on a buttered baking sheet. Bake in a moderate 
oven twenty minutes. Cut in squares immediately after 
removing from oven. Serve cold or warm with coffee. 

Mrs. F. Richardson, Santa Rosa, Fla. 

To Cut Cookies 

When making Ginger Snaps, Cookies, etc., if the dough is shaped 
in long narrow rolls and chilled on ice or left in a cold place 
over night it may be sliced off instead of rolling. This saves a 
good deal of time and is very satisfactory. 

Miss Annie E. Graybill, Buchanan, Va. 
Use Leuel Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



GINGERBREADS, COOKIES, ETC. 



85 



Soft Molasses Cookies 

Cream one and one-half cups brown sugar and one cup lard. 
Add two eggs and one cup molasses, beat well. Sift together 
five cups bread flour, one teaspoon soda, one tablespoon ground 
ginger, one teaspoon salt, add to other ingredients. Now add 
one cup boiling water very gradually and beat well. Drop by 
the spoonful onto greased baking sheets and bake in hot oven. 

Mrs. W. Ed. Hughes, East Rochester, N. Y. 

Boston Cookies 

One cup butter, one and one-half cups Larkin Sugar, three 
eggs, one teaspoon Larkin Soda, one and one-half teaspoons 
hot water, three and one-fourth cups Larkin Bread Flour, 
one-half teaspoon salt, one teaspoon Larkin Cinnamon, one 
cup chopped walnuts, one-half cup each of Larkin Currants and 
Raisins, seeded and chopped. Cream the butter, add the sugar 
gradually, then the eggs, lightly beaten. Sift flour three times 
with salt, cinnamon and soda, then add nut meats, fruit and 
flour. Drop on greased pans with a teaspoon an inch apart. 
Bake in moderate oven. These will improve with keeping. 

Mrs. Charles J. Prankard, Upper Troy, N. Y, 

Jelly Cookies 

One-half cup butter, one cup sugar, one egg, one-fourth cup 
sour milk, one-half teaspoon soda. Add flour enough to roll 
out thin. Cut in two layers. Use doughnut-cutter for top 
layer. Spreadapple jelly or fig paste between. Bake in hot oven. 

Mattie E. Robinson, Wn.LiAMSTOwN, Vt. 

Spice Cookies 

One cup molasses, one-half cup sugar, one-half cup each lard 
and butter, four cups flour, one teaspoon each ginger, salt, 
soda and cinnamon, one-half teaspoon nutmeg, two eggs. Heat 
molasses to boiling point, add sugar and shortening. Mix 
and sift dry ingredients, add to first mixture with the eggs 
lightly beaten. Chill and roll out. In warm weather prepare 
the mixture over night or some hours before using so that it 
may be easily rolled. ^^^ ^^^^ ^^^^^^^^ Dubuque, Iowa. 

Graham Cookies 

One egg, one cup brown sugar, one cup sour milk, one tablespoon 
molasses, four tablespoons shortening, one teaspoon each soda 
and cinnamon, two cups graham flour, one cup raisins. Drop 
on greased pans. These are delicious with or without raisins. 

Mrs. Walter Nichols, Birmingham, Mich. 
Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



86 



GINGERBREADS, COOKIES, ETC. 



OatmccJ Cookies No. 1 

Cream together one cup butter and Larkin Pure Lard mixed, 
add one cup Larkin Granulated Sugar. Sift together three 
cups Larkin Fancy Patent Flour, one teaspoon Larkin Soda 
and one teaspoon Larkin Cinnamon. Sift three times. Now 
add two cups Larkin Rolled Oats and one cup Larkin Seeded 
Raisins. Mix thoroughly. Beat light two eggs, add one 
tablespoon Larkin Evaporated Milk and five of water. Drop 
by the spoonful onto a greased baking sheet. Bake in a hot 

^'^'^^- Mrs. L. Leslie Jones, Mansfield, Mass. 

Rich Oatmeal Cookies No. 2 

Three-fourths cup shortening, one cup sugar, two eggs. Sift 
two cups flour with one teaspoon each soda and cinnamon, 
three times, add two cups oatmeal, two cups chopped raisins, 
one cup chopped pecan or walnut meats, one cup Larkin Cocoa- 
nut, four tablespoons sour milk. Mix in order given, drop on 
buttered baking sheet, bake in medium oven. 

Mrs. a. H. Cameron, San Antonio, Texas. 

Christmas Cookies 

One-fourth cup butter, one cup sugar, two eggs, one cup 
molasses, one cup sour cream, two teaspoons soda, one-fourth 
pound mixed candied peel, one-fourth pound almonds, one 
teaspoon cinnamon, one-half teaspoon nutmeg. Add sufficient 
flour to roll out, cut with fancy cutters, bake in moderate oven. 
These improve with keeping. 

Mrs. Volney G. Pitcher, Jackson, Mich. 

Hermits 

Two cups brown sugar, three-fourths cup butter, two eggs 
well beaten, one teaspoon soda put into one-half cup boiling 
water, three cups flour, one cup chopped raisins and one cup 
currants. Cream the butter, add sugar, then add the well- 
beaten eggs and stir until well mixed ; add the remaining ingre- 
dients. Drop on baking sheets, bake in a moderate oven. 

Mrs. Jno. Marasek, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Elggless Cookies 

Sift together six cups flour, two teaspoons baking powder, one 
teaspoon salt, one teaspoon soda, one teaspoon nutmeg. Into 
this rub one cup shortening. Add two cups brown sugar and 
enough sour milk to make a soft dough. Roll out lightly, 
sprinkle with sugar and bake quickly. Raisins may be placed 
on some and jelly on others. Sweet milk may be used in place 
of sour. j^j^g Luther Miller, New Philadelphia, Ohio. 



Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



GINGERBREADS, COOKIES, ETC. 



87 



Eggless Date Cookies 

One cup sugar, one-half cup butter and lard mixed, one-half 
cup sour milk, two cups Larkin Rolled Oats put through food- 
chopper, one teaspoon soda, flour to make stiff enough to roll 
every thin. Mix in the usual manner, cut in any desired shape, 
and put together in pairs with the following filling: 
Wash and remove stones from one-half pound Larkin Dates, 
add three-fourths cup sugar and one cup cold water. Cook 
twenty minutes, use when quite cold. 

Mrs. Besse Binnall, Dow City, Iowa. 

Special Peanut Cookies 

Put three tablespoons Larkin Peanut Butter, one teaspoon 
lard, one and one-half cups granulated sugar, and two eggs 
into a mixing bowl. Stir and beat until mixture is quite light. 
Add two and one-half cups sifted flour and on^ teaspoon soda 
dissolved in three tablespoons thick sour milk. Flavor with 
one teaspoon Larkin Vanilla Extract. Roll and bake in a quick 
oven. This amount makes fifty cookies. 

Mrs. G. W. Parrins, Lyons, N. Y. 

Chocolate Cookies 

Cream one-half cup butter, add one cup brown sugar, one egg, 
one-half cup sour milk, two squares or ounces Larkin Chocolate 
melted over hot water. Sift one and one-half cups flour with 
one-half teaspoon soda, add one-half cup raisins, one-half cup 
chopped walnut meats. Mix well and drop with a teaspoon 
on buttered pans or use more flour and roll out. Bake in a 
moderate oven. Nuts may be left out if not on hand. 

Mrs. W.X. Austin, Alliance, Nebr. 

Cocoanut or Sugar Cookies 

Mix together thoroughly, one cup lard or butter, two cups 
sugar, two eggs, one cup cocoanut. Sift two and one-half 
cups flour with two teaspoons baking powder. If not stiff 
enough, add more flour to roll out quite thin. Bake quickly. 
All materials are Larkin except the eggs. For sugar cookies 
leave out cocoanut, add one teaspoon lemon extract, 

Mrs. W. C. Hudson, Orangeburgh, N. Y. 

Raisin Drop Cookies 

Mix and beat well together, one and one-half cups brown sugar, 
two-thirds cup butter, three eggs. Add one and one-half cups 
raisins chopped fine, two and one-half cups flour, sifted with 
one teaspoon soda, one teaspoon cloves and nutmeg mixed. 
Drop on a baking sheet. Bake in slow oven. 

Mrs. Ray F. Cossentine, Susquehanna, Pa. 

Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



88 GINGERBREADS, COOKIES, ETC. 

Doughnuts 

One cup sugar, one cup milk, two eggs beaten fine as silk, 
A little nutmeg (lemon will do), of baking powder, teaspoons 

two, 
Lightly stir the flour in, roll on pie-board not too thin; 
Cut in diamonds, twists or rings, then drop with care the doughy 

things 
Into fat that briskly swells, evenly the spongy cells. 
Roll in sugar, lay to cool. Always use this simple rule. 

For chocolate doughnuts use the above rule, add four table- 
spoons of cocoa with the flour, or two ounces of melted chocolate. 
Mrs. Belle Thorp Ocker, West Union, Iowa. 

Potato Doughnuts 

Three tablespoons lard, three-fourths cup sugar, two eggs, one 
cup freshly mashed potato, one-fourth cup milk, sift together 
two and one-half cups flour, three teaspoons baking powder, 
one-half teaspoon salt, one-half teaspoon cinnamon, one-fourth 
teaspoon ground nutmeg. Cream the lard, add the sugar, 
then the eggs. Stir in the potato and milk. Add the flour 
gradually and use more if necessary. Roll and cut all the 
doughnuts before commencing the frying. Fry in deep lard 
or cooking oil. This rule will make three dozen. One cup of 
beef-suet melted with lard is good for frying. 

Ruth Wiggins, Shelby, Ohio. 

Buttermilk Doughnuts 

Beat one egg, add one cup brown sugar and one cup buttermilk, 
two tablespoons butter or lard. Sift together four and one- 
half cups flour, one-half teaspoon Larkin Soda, one teaspoon 
Larkin Baking Powder, one-half teaspoon salt. Stir together, 
roll out. Cut, and fry in deep fat. 

Dessie L. Nuzum, WatsoN; W, Va. 





Baked Apple Pudding 

Half fill a pudding dish with sliced apples, add sugar and 
spice, cook until almost soft. Set aside to cool. While still 
steaming cover with a batter made by sifting together one pint 
flour, two teaspoons baking powder, one-half teaspoon salt, 
and one-half cup sugar. Add one egg well beaten, two table- 
spoons melted shortening and three-fourths cup milk. Bake 
in a moderate oven one-half hour. Any dried fruit may be used 
instead of apples. Serve with a sweet sauce or cream. 

Mary G. Murphy, Roxbury, Mass. 
Spiced Apple Pudding 

Sift together two cups flour, one teaspoon allspice, one-half 

teaspoon ground nutmeg and two teaspoons baking powder. 

Add one beaten egg, one cup sugar, four tablespoons soft butter, 

one cup milk and one cup cooked Larkin Canned Apples. Mix 

well and spread in a flat pan. Bake forty-five minutes in a 

moderate oven or steam one and one-half hours in a covered 

bowl. Serve with sweet sauce. „ „ „ tt 

H. Harper, Portsmouth, Va. 

Suet Pudding 

Take two cups flour, two eggs, two cups raisins, one cup cur- 
rants, one-half teaspoon salt, one-half cup chopped suet, one- 
half cup sour milk, one teaspoon soda. Stir all together and 
put into food pan of Larkin Double-Boiler. Steam three hours. 

Serve with sweet sauce. a^ t^ «- <- n 

Mrs. E. Grindrod, Connellsville, Pa. 

Queen Pudding 

One pint bread-crumbs, two tablespoons melted butter, one cup 
sugar, one quart milk, three eggs, one teaspoon lemon extract. 
Soak the crumbs in the milk for half hour; beat yolks of eggs 
with the sugar until yellow, add the lemon extract and butter. 
Pour into baking-dish and bake for one-half hour. When done, 
spread a layer of jelly or jam over the top. Beat the egg whites 
quite stiff; add four tablespoons granulated sugar and spread 
over the pudding. Brown lightly in a moderate oven and serve. 

Mrs. Albrecht, Jamaica, N. Y. 

Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



90 



DESSERTS 



Marshmallow Pudding 

Soften one-half package Larkin Gelatine in one-half cup cold 
water. Add one cup sugar to one cup boiling water; when 
sugar is dissolved add gelatine. Beat the whites of four eggs 
very stiff and pour the liquid over them beating all the time 
as for boiled icing. Take one-third of the mixture and color 
with Larkin Apple-Green Culinary Paste, add to it one-fourth 
cup each of chopped pineapple, Maraschino cherries and English 
walnuts. Pour one-half of the white mixture into an oblong 
pan, then the pink and the white last; stand aside to cool. 
Cut in slices like brick ice-cream. Serve with a custard made 
with yolks of two eggs, one pint milk, one-half cup sugar, and 
one teaspoon corn starch. Flavor with vanilla. 

Mrs. J. Herbert Robinson, Washington, D. C. 

Sea-FoEim Pudding 

Scald three cups milk; dilute three tablespoons Larkin Corn 
Starch in one-fourth cup milk. Add a little of the scalded 
milk to the corn starch; pour back into sauce-pan; add one-half 
cup sugar and cook five minutes. Remove from fire; add one- 
half teaspoon extract and the stiffly-beaten whites of two eggs. 
Pour into mold. Serve with cream or boiled custard. 

Mrs. Louise M. Cobb, South Boston, Mass. 
Leirkin Cocoanut Pudding 

One pint milk; one-half cup Larkin Sugar; one-half cup rolled 
crackers; two tablespoons Larkin Shredded Cocoanut; pinch 
of Larkin Salt; yolks of two eggs; one teaspoon Larkin Lemon 
Flavoring Extract. Bake like custard. Beat whites of eggs, 
add a little sugar, put on top and brown in oven. 

Mrs. E. a. Whitney, Melrose, Mass. 
Steamed Chocolate Pudding 

Melt two ounces chocolate over hot water; beat one egg light, 
add one cup milk, sift three teaspoons baking powder with two 
cups of flour and one-fourth teaspoon salt. Add egg and milk 
gradually to flour, adding chocolate last. Pour into buttered 
mold ; steam one and one-half hours. Serve with creamy sauce. 

Mrs. R. E. Smith, Milan, Pa. 

inexpensive Plum Pudding 

Mix thoroughly two cups stale bread-crumbs, one cup Larkin 
Molasses, one cup sweet milk, one-half cup or one-fourth pound 
chopped suet, one egg, one teaspoon Larkin Cinnamon, one- 
half teaspoon Larkin Ground Cloves and Nutmeg, one cup 
raisins mixed with one-half cup flour and one-fourth teaspoon 
Larkin Soda. Put into a tin can or pail. Steam four hours. 
Serve with sweet sauce. mrs. James F. Ripley, Bethel, Vt. 

Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



DESSERTS 



91 



Old English Plum Pudding 

Put into a mixing bowl one cup suet chopped fine, grate one 

raw carrot and one potato, add one cup sugar, three-fourths 

cup molasses, three eggs, one teaspoon salt, two cups Larkin 

Raisins, one cup currants, one cup sour milk, one teaspoon 

soda; add sufficient flour to the mixture to make a stiff 

batter. Steam four hours in a covered bowl. Serve with 

sweet or hard sauce. x/r a t- c ^ ^ »t -., 

Miss Alice E. Seidmore, Ballston Spa, N. Y. 

Thanksgiving Pudding 

Three and one-half cups milk, eighteen crackers rolled fine, 
one cup sugar, four eggs, one teaspoon each allspice and salt, 
one-half pound seeded raisins, one-half cup butter. Pour milk 
over crackers. Leave twenty minutes. Add sugar, eggs 
slightly beaten, allspice, salt and butter. Parboil raisins until 
soft, add to mixture, turn into buttered pudding dish, bake 
slowly two and one-half hours. Stir once to prevent raisins 
settling. Serve with sweet sauce. 

Mrs. George Balcom, Natick, Mass. 

Date and Nut Pudding 

One and one-half cups flour, two teaspoons baldng powder, 

one cup sugar, two eggs, one cup each of chopped dates and 

walnuts. Mix as a cake. Put dates and walnuts through a 

Larkin Food-Chopper and add last. This may be spread in 

pie-pans and baked one-half hour in a moderate oven, but I 

prefer to put it into small cups and steam three-fourths of an 

hour in a Larkin Steam Cooker. Will serve six people. Serve 

with whipped cream. a/i t> u /-. ^ a t n* 

^^ Mrs. p. H. Overgard, Albert Lea, Minn. 

StcJe Cake Pudding 

If you have any stale spice or fruit cake on hand, break it up 
in small pieces. Use half as much milk as you have cake. Mix 
together. Put into bowl and steam one hour. Sometimes a 
stale cake may be bought for a few cents at the baker's. It 
will make a good, cheap pudding. Serve with hard or sweet sauce. 

E. L. GiBBS, Campello, Mass. 

Cranberry Pudding 

One-third cup butter, one cup sugar, two eggs, one-half cup 

milk, one and one-half cups flour, one and one-half teaspoons 

baking powder, one cup raw cranberries, one-half teaspoon 

lemon extract. Mix as for layer cake. Add cranberries and 

flavoring extract last. Bake in medium oven. Serve warm 

with hard or sweet sauce. Ti>r /^ m ti t 

Miss Orril Newland, Hoopeston, III. 

Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



92 



DESSERTS 



Baked Rhubarb Pudding 

Wash fresh rhubarb. Do not remove the skin, cut in one- 
inch pieces until you have four cups. Put into a pudding 
dish with four or five shces of buttered bread cut in cubes and 
one cup sugar. Bake twenty minutes in moderate oven. 
Cover the pudding during the first ten minutes and then you 
will need no water as the rhubarb is juicy. 

Miss Jessie M. Will, Canal Winchester, Ohio. 
Graham Pudding 

Two and one-half cups graham flour, one cup milk (or Larkin 
Evaporated Milk diluted with water), one cup molasses, 
one teaspoon soda, one cup currants or raisins, a pinch of 
salt. Mix all together, steam in double-boiler for two hours. 
It is good served with lemon sauce but best with whipped 
cream. This pudding is what everyone likes. It is almost 
as light as a souffle and simply delicious. All Larkin material 

"^^^" Mrs. William Reahr, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Snow Pudding 

Soak one-half package Larkin Gelatine in one-half cup cold 
water, dissolve in two cups boiling water, add two cups sugar, 
one-fourth cup lemon juice. Set aside in cool place; stir 
occasionally and when quite thick beat with whisk until frothy. 
Fold in whites of four eggs beaten quite stiff. When stiff 
enough to hold its shape, pile in glass dish. Serve with boiled 
custard. ^^^ Charles A. Martin, Gardner, Mass. 

Baked Caramel Pudding 

Scald one quart milk, brown one-half cup Larkin Sugar in 
spider. Add milk to sugar and place on back of stove until 
sugar melts in the milk. Add two cups bread-crumbs, two 
beaten eggs, two-thirds cup sugar, one teaspoon Larkin, Vanilla, 
one-fourth teaspoon Larkin Salt. Pour into buttered dish. 
Bake one hour in slow oven. 

Mrs. Charles P. Loring, Auburn, Maine. 

Creamy Rice Pudding 

To one quart new milk add four tablespoons Larkin Rice 
washed in cold water. Add three tablespoons sugar and a 
pinch of salt. Flavor with Larkin Nutmeg. Stir all together, 
place in a moderate oven and bake two hours. Stir once 
during the first hour. One and one-half cups raisins may be 
added if liked. They are not necessary however. 

Mrs. Joseph Clish, Marquette, Mich. 

Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



DESSERTS 



93 



Rice Pudding in Double-Boiler 

Put one-half cup Larkin Comet Rice into double-boiler with 
two cups sweet milk. Cook until quite soft. Add one-fourth 
cup Larkin Raisins and one-fourth teaspoon nutmeg. Cook 
twenty minutes. Then add one egg beaten with one-half cup 
sugar. Cook three minutes. Serve hot or cold. 

Mrs. Charles E. Wiley, North Amherst, Mass. 

Baked Tapioca Pudding 

Wash and soak three-fourths cup tapioca in two cups milk 
over night or for several hours. When ready to bake add 
another two cups milk, one-third cup sugar, one pinch salt 
and one-fourth teaspoon nutmeg or any extract and bake 
one and one-quarter hours. If you can spare it, beat one egg 
and add to the pudding fifteen minutes before serving. 

Mrs. Martha Strudwick, Belmar, N. J. 

Indian Tapioca 

Mix together one-third cup tapioca and one-fourth cup Indian 
meal and stir while sprinkling into one quart scalded milk. Stir 
and cook until the tapioca becomes transparent, then stir into 
the pudding one cup molasses, one-half teaspoon salt, two table- 
spoons butter and turn into a buttered baking dish. Pour over 
the top one and one-half cups cold milk and set in the oven with- 
out stirring. Bake about an hour. Serve with or without cream. 

Mrs. J. L. Lindberg, Worcester, Mass. 

Apple Tapioca 

One cup Larkin Pearl Tapioca, one-half teaspoon salt, one-half 
cup sugar, one-half teaspoon nutmeg and five apples. Wash 
the tapioca in cold water, soak over night in six cups water. 
Put in Larkin Double-Boiler, add the salt and sugar. Cook 
one hour. Put a layer of tapioca in a baking dish, then a layer 
of apples pared and sliced. Sprinkle with nutmeg and sugar. 
Cover with tapioca and bake until apples are tender (about 
forty-five minutes). Serve with whipped or plain cream. This 
dish is very pretty if the tapioca is colored a light red with 

^ * Mrs. Emery Christensen, Morocco, Ind. 

Pineapple Tapioca 

Take one cup Larkin Pearl Tapioca, cover with water, soak 

over night. In the morning add one-half cup water, cook 

until clear. Add one pint diced pineapple, juice of two lemons 

and one cup sugar. Take from the fire, fold in whites of three 

eggs beaten quite stiff. Serve with whipped cream or sweet 

sauce. This is fine. ,, ata/t t> t 

Mrs. a. L. Miller, Eleroy, III. 

Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



94 



DESSERTS 



Tapioca Cream 

Put one-fourth cup Larkin Pearl Tapioca into double-boiler. 
Cover with cold water and soak one hour. Drain off water, 
add two cups milk and cook until tapioca is soft and trans- 
parent. Add the yolks of two eggs beaten with one-third cup 
Larkin Sugar. Add one-fourth teaspoon salt. Add part of 
the tapioca mixture to the eggs. Put back into sauce-pan. 
Cook for three minutes or until it thickens. Remove from 
fire, add the stiffly-beaten whites of two eggs, flavor with one- 
half teaspoon each of lemon and orange extract. Serve with 
or without cream. ^j^^ Walter F. Barringer. Newark, N. J. 

Brown Betty 

In a quart pudding-dish arrange alternate layers of sliced apples 
and bread-crumbs; season each layer with bits of butter, a 
little sugar and a pinch each of ground cinnamon, cloves and 
allspice. When the dish is full pour over it one-half cup each of 
molasses and water mixed; cover the top with crumbs. Place 
the dish in a pan containing hot water and bake three-fourths 
of an hour. Serve with any sweet sauce. 

Mrs. Jennie L. Thomas, Amsterdam, N. Y. 

Coffee Corn Starch 

Four tablespoons each of sugar and corn starch, one cup of 
left-over Larkin Coffee, one cup milk, one-fourth teaspoon salt. 
Mix corn starch and sugar with a little of the cold milk. Scald 
remainder of milk with the coffee. Pour slowly on corn starch 
mixture. Cook in double-boiler stirring until it thickens. 
Cover and cook ten minutes. Pour into wet mold and chill. 
Serve with whipped cream. ^ ^ lindsay, Allston, Mass. 

Strawberry Shortcake 

Make a biscuit crust with two cups Larkin Flour sifted twice 
with two teaspoons baking powder and one-half teaspoon salt; 
rub in two tablespoons each of butter and lard. Mix with 
one-half cup milk, use a little flour to keep it from sticking to 
the hands and put into a pie-tin. Bake in a quick oven. When 
done, split apart and butter each half. Then spread with 
strawberries prepared as follows: To one quart berries allow 
one cup sugar; mash sugar and berries. Let stand an hour 
or two. Before using, beat the white of one egg and stir into 
the berries. Spread between the cake, put a generous supply 
on top and cover the whole with whipped cream. 

Mrs. Mary E. Davidson, Melrose, Mass. 

Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



DESSERTS 



95 



Raspberry Blanc Mange 

Heat one and one-half cups milk in a double-boiler; add one-half 
cup sugar. Mix six tablespoons Larkin Corn Starch with one- 
half cup milk, add to the scalded milk, stir until it thickens. 
Cook ten minutes, add one-half teaspoon Larkin Vanilla Flavor- 
ing Extract and one-fourth teaspoon Larkin Salt (the blanc 
mange may be colored a light pink with Larkin Cherry-Red 
Culinary Paste). Put a layer of Larkin Raspberry Jam into 
the bottom of a glass dish. When cold turn the blanc mange 
onto it, sprinkle with Larkin Shredded Cocoanut and it is 

* Miss Vera Laverty, Lomerville, Mass. 

Rye and Raspberries 

Dilute one cup rye flour with one cup water or milk. Add two 
cups scalded milk, one teaspoon salt and three-fourths cup 
sugar. Cook in double-boiler one hour or in fireless cooker 
several hours. Serve with ripe raspberries and milk or cream. 
A delicious and wholesome dessert or breakfast dish. 

Miss Alice Grady, New Haven, Conn. 

Bavarian Cream 

Prepare one package Larkin Orange Jelly Dessert using the 
juice from one can of Larkin Pineapple and water sufficient to 
make one and one-half cups; add one-half cup sugar, the juice 
of one lemon and enough Larkin Cherry- Red Culinary Paste 
to give a pretty pink color. Put aside to cool. When it begins 
to thicken, add one cup of cream whipped until stiff. Pour 
into a pan rinsed with cold water; have the jelly one inch thick. 
When firm cut in small squares, lay on each square a slice of 
pineapple, cover the pineapple with whipped sweetened cream. 
Decorate with cherries and sprinkle with chopped nuts 

Mrs. J. M. Martin, Columbia, Tenn. 

Orange Dessert 

Arrange layers of sliced oranges, sprinkle each layer with 

Larkin Powdered Sugar and Shredded Cocoanut. Sliced 

oranges when served alone should not stand long after slicing, 

as they are apt to become bitter. This may be served as a 

salad or dessert. t^/, r- itu t- /- t 

Mrs. G. W. Fogg, Creston, Iowa. 

Marshmallow Dessert 

Cut one-half pound each of Larkin Marshmallows and walnuts 
in small pieces. Whip one-half pint cream, sweeten and flavor 
to taste. Serve in sherbet glasses with a tiny piece of jelly 
or a Maraschino cherry on top. 

Mrs. Alonzo Bailey, Island Pond, Vt. 
Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



96 



DESSERTS 



Maple Cream Sponge 

Soak one-fourth box of Larkin Gelatine in cold water until soft. 
Dissolve in one cup hot milk, add one-third cup sugar and one- 
half teaspoon vanilla. When gelatine is beginning to thicken, 
stir it up and fold in lightly one pint whipped cream to which 
has been added one cup maple syrup and one-half cup chopped 
walnut meats. Put on ice and serve when firm. 

L. G. Partridge, Spofford, N. H. 

Rice Jelly Sponge 

Boil one-fourth cup Larkin Rice. Drain off the water, add 
one pint milk, one-half cup sugar; when quite hot, add two 
tablespoons gelatine softened in one-half cup water. Stir over 
the fire two minutes. Set aside to cool. When cool fold in 
one-half pint whipped cream flavored with one teaspoon Larkin 
Vanilla. Pour into a mold. Serve with canned strawberries, 
raspberries or peaches. ^^^ ^^^^ ^ B^^^^^ ^^^^^^^ ^^^^^ 

Prune Jelly 

Soak one pound of prunes over night, the next day cook until 
tender. Remove the stones and add a little sugar. Make a 
plain jelly with one-half package Larkin Gelatine; when begin- 
ning to set add the prunes and the stiffly beaten white of one 
egg. Serve with cream or custard sauce. 

Mrs. R. E. Chace, Somerset, Mass. 

Baked Apples with Sauce 

Wash and core six large apples. Fill the centers with sugar 
and cinnamon. Pour a little water over the apples. Bake in 
moderate oven. Make a sauce with one and one-half cups of 
milk, one-half cup sugar, one and one-half tablespoons Larkin 
Corn Starch and one egg. Flavor with vanilla. Serve warm 

^ ^ ' Mrs. a. Wiltmann, Pearl River, N. Y. 

Dainty Dessert 

Prepare one box of Larkin Gelatine according to directions, put 
away to chill. When just setting beat up gelatine with a fork 
or egg-beater and add one and one-half pounds of Larkin Marsh- 
mallows cut in small pieces, one dozen macaroons crumbled 
with the hands, or clipped with scissors in small pieces, 
one-quarter pound of almonds coarsely chopped. When 
well mixed fold in one and one-half pints of cream whipped 
quite stiff and flavored with any extract. When quite firm it 
is ready to serve. These quantities will serve twenty people. 

Mrs. C. E. Chamberlain, East Providence, R. I. 
Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



DESSERTS 



97 



FROZEN DESSERTS 

Frozen desserts are easily and quickly made and are both 
cooling and refreshing. To make the work as easy as possible a 
good freezer, a burlap bag, a wooden mallet or an axe, a dipper or 
sauce-pan, ice and coarse rock salt are needed. 

Put the ice into the bag and crush fine — the freezing will be 
accomplished in much less time if the ice is quite fine. Place can 
containing the mixture in freezer and turn the crank to be sure it 
fits properly, then pack around it solidly with salt and ice, using 
three level measures of ice to one of salt. If only a small amount 
is to be frozen, the ice and salt need not come to the top of the can. 
In winter snow may be used in place of ice. Never have the can 
more than three-fourths full as the mixture increases in bulk during 
freezing, and if the can is overcrowded, the cream will be coarse- 
grained. Turn the crank slowly and steadily to expose as large 
surface of mixture as possible to ice and salt. Never draw off the 
salt water until mixture is frozen, unless it is apt to get into the 
can, because the salt water hastens the freezing. After mixture 
is frozen, draw off the water, remove the dasher, and with a spoon 
pack solidly or place in a mold as preferred, put cork in opening 
in cover and repack, using four level measures of ice to one of salt. 
Place an old piece of carpet over the top. When ready to serve, 
run cool water over the can to wash off salty water. 

ICE-CREAMS AND SHERBETS 

Ice-Cream with Milk 

Three eggs, three quarts milk, two cups sugar, one-fourth 
package gelatine, two teaspoons extract. Soak the gelatine 
five minutes in one cup milk, scald the balance of one quart; 
add the eggs to this; cook until thick; now add the softened 
gelatine. Add the milk and any extract preferred. Crushed 
fruit or fruit juice may be used with this if liked. These quan- 
tities make one gallon of cream. ^^^ j ^ p^^^^^^ Seaford, Va. 

New Idea Ice-Cream 

Moisten the contents of one package Larkin Prepared Pudding 
in three-fourths cup cold milk. Scald the remainder of a quart 
of milk; into it stir the moistened powder. Cook ten minutes. 
Remove from fire, stir in two eggs beaten light and one quart 
milk. Add one-fourth teaspoon salt and one tablespoon of 
any extract. If you can spare it, add one cup cream. Freeze. 
This will serve twelve people. ^^^^ ^^^^^ ^^^^ Brockton, Mass. 

Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



98 



DESSERTS 



Coffee Ice-Crecim 

Scald two quarts milk. Beat the yolks of six eggs and two 
cups sugar together until light. Add them to the scalded 
milk. Stir and cook for ten minutes, take from the fire and 
add one pint cream. Stir constantly for two minutes, then add 
one-half cup Larkin Ground Coffee and stand on the stove until 
thoroughly heated. Stand aside until cool. Strain and freeze. 

Mrs. Frank S. Merrill, Bristol, Conn. 

Orange Ice-Cream 

Use two pint-size cans of Larkin Evaporated Milk; add an 
equal amount of water that has previously been boiled and 
cooled and one pound sugar. Flavor with three teaspoons 
Larkin Orange Flavoring Extract. Mix together well and 
freeze in a Larkin Ice-Cream Freezer. This makes about two 
quarts of delicious ice-cream. Any other flavoring desired 
may be used. ^^^ ^ (. Korahek, Chicago, III. 

Fruit Cream with Gelatine 

Soften one-quarter box Larkin Gelatine in one cup milk. Scald 
the remainder of one quart milk. Add one and one-half cups 
sugar to milk and pour over the gelatine. Flavor with one 
and one-half teaspoons of any Larkin Flavoring Extract. Add 
a pinch of salt. When cold add one pint cream (whipped). 
Freeze in Larkin Ice-Cream Freezer. When frozen remove 
the dasher, repack and allow to ripen about two hours, that 
the ingredients may be well blended. One pint of any kind 
of crushed fruit may be used with this. 

Mrs. Roy S. Heatwole, Harrisonburg, Va. 

Lemon Sherbet 

Juice of four lemons, grated rind of two, one quart water, 
three cups Larkin Sugar, one-fourth package Larkin Gelatine, 
one teaspoon Larkin Vanilla Flavoring Extract, white of one 
egg. To the lemon juice and rind, add the sugar. Soak the 
gelatine in one-half cup cold water. Dissolve by standing in 
a pan of hot water. Thoroughly mix all ingredients and when 
partly frozen add the stiffly-beaten white of egg. Freeze 
again. Fruit may be added to this if desired. 

Mrs. I. F. Hurt, Roanoke, Va. 
Milk Sherbet 

Two quarts milk, juice of six oranges and one large lemon, 
sugar to sweeten, one-fourth teaspoon salt. Mix juice and 
sugar. Stir constantly while adding milk; freeze and serve. 

JosEPmNE Murphy, Roxbury, Mass. 

Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



DESSERTS 



99 



Peach Sherbet 

One quart canned peaches, one quart cream, one and one-half 

pints water, two cups sugar, whites of three eggs. Put the 

peaches through a sieve or colander, add sugar and water, 

then the cream. When partly frozen add the beaten whites 

of the eggs. This quantity makes one gallon in a Larkin 

Freezer and is delicious. ,, iv/r c tv* r. 

Mrs. Mary Slee, Muncy, Pa. 

Chocolate Mousse 

Put one ounce or square of unsweetened chocolate into a small 
sauce-pan with one-fourth cup sugar ; add one tablespoon boiling 
water, and stir over the fire until smooth. Add a few spoons 
of cream to this mixture and whip the remainder of a pint of 
cream until quite stiff. Sweeten the cream with three-fourths 
cup sugar; add one tablespoon vanilla extract and the chocolate 
mixture to the cream. Pour into chilled mold and pack in 
a wooden pail for three hours using equal parts of ice and salt. 

Daisy E. Light, Martinsburg, West Va. 

Fruit Mousse 

Whip one pint cream; add one pint Larkin Canned Fruit or 

preserves and mix well with cream; pack in ice or snow and 

leave three or four hours. t»,t r. c< c tv/t r. 

Mrs. R. E. Smith, Milan, Pa. 

Maple Syrup Cream 

Dilute six tablespoons corn starch in cold milk, scald the balance 
of three pints in double-boiler; add corn starch; cook ten 
minutes. Add yolks of three eggs; cook three minutes, then 
add stififly-beaten whites. Remove from the fire; add two cups 
Larkin Maple Syrup. When quite cold add one pint cream; 
one tablespoon vanilla extract and one cup hickory or walnut 
meats finely chopped or put through food-chopper. The nuts are 
not necessary but improve the flavor. Freeze when quite cold. 

Mrs. Ray F. CossENTifjE, Susquehanna, Pa. 





PAST 




Pie-Crust 

Two cups sifted flour, one-half cup lard, one-fourth cup ice- 
water, one-half teaspoon salt. Cut the lard into the flour 
with a knife until thoroughly mixed, then stir in the water. Do 
not touch with the hands until this is done. Turn it on a 
board and roll quite thin using as little flour as possible in the 
rolling; fold and roll out again, and continue the folding and 
rolling for two or three minutes. Everything should be very 
cold and the hands used as little as possible. 

Elizabeth G. Leary, West Chester, Pa. 

Baking Powder Crust 

Sift together two and one-half cups Larkin Flour, one and one- 
half teaspoons baking powder, one-half teaspoon Larkin Salt, 
one-half cup Larkin Corn Starch. Chop in three-fourths cup 
Larkin Lard with a Larkin Spatula. When thoroughly mixed, 
add enough cold water to mix to a firm dough. Roll out 
quickly and lightly. Enough for two pies. 

Mrs. Barnett M. Rhetta, Baltimore, Md. 
Raisin Turnovers 

Two cups Larkin Pastry Flour, three-fourths cup Larkin Pure 
Lard, one-half teaspoon salt, ice-water to mix. Sift flour and 
salt together in a wooden bowl; chop shortening in thoroughly; 
add ice-water to mix. Roll out, fold evenly into three layers; 
turn half around and roll again. Repeat twice. This makes 
it flaky. Cut out with a saucer. Place one tablespoon of 
raisin filling on one-half; prick and turn over the upper half 
and pinch edges together. 

To Make the Raisin Filling: 

Juice and grated rind of one lemon, one cup Larkin Seeded 
Raisins, three Larkin Soda Crackers, one cup Larkin Granu- 
lated Sugar, one egg, two tablespoons cold water. Chop 
raisins and crackers, beat egg and sugar, then mix all together. 
One-half cup chopped walnuts or pecans added to the filling 
is a great improvement. These are excellent for a picnic, as 
they carry nicely. ^^^^^ g_ ^^^^^_ ^^^^^^^ P^^_ 



Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



PASTRY AND PIES 



101 



Peanut Butter Pin- Wheels 

Two cups flour sifted with one-half teaspoon salt and two 

teaspoons Larkin Baking Powder. Work into this one-half 

cup lard and mix to a dough with milk. Roll out lightly into 

a long wide strip. Mix one-fourth cup peanut butter with two 

tablespoons water, add a few grains of salt, spread with a spatula. 

Roll up as for jelly roll. Cut in slices one-fourth inch thick. 

Bake in a hot oven. A/r u ^ c ^ xr ^r 

Mrs. Henry R. Spencer, Granville, N. Y. 

Crust Cake 

Mix together two cups Larkin Powdered Sugar, two cups 
Larkin Flour, two teaspoons Larkin Baking Powder, two eggs 
beaten, one-half cup butter and one-half cup milk; add one- 
half teaspoon Larkin Vanilla. Put in pie-plates lined with pie- 
crust. Sprinkle the cakes well with powdered sugar before 
putting in oven to bake. This will make four ordinary-sized 
cakes. When done they will look like a pie. 

Mrs. George Owens, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Cheese Straws 

Two and one-half cups pastry flour, one and one-half teaspoons 

salt, one-half teaspoon baking powder, three-fourths cup 

water, one-half pound cheese (put through food-chopper) one 

teaspoon paprika, two-thirds cup shortening. Mix and roll 

as for pastry. Cut in strips five inches long and one-fourth 

inch wide. Bake eight minutes in hot oven. Pile log-cabin 

fashion and serve with salad or coffee. These quantities make 

ninety cheese straws. a/t t>w t>. t^ at ^r 

•' Mrs. David Davies, Remsen, N. Y. 

Lemon Cheese 

One-fourth pound butter, six eggs well beaten, juice and grated 
rind of three lemons. Mix and put over a slow fire, stir all 
the time. When thick as honey add two cups sugar and cook 
a little longer. Pour into jars, seal and it will keep for six 
months. If it is not required to keep, use less sugar. This 
makes a nice filling for tarts or jelly cakes. 

Mrs. F. Richardson, Santa Rosa, Fla. 

Lemon 3ponge Pie 

One cup sugar, three tablespoons butter, yolks of two eggs. 
Beat these together. Add juice and grated rind of one lemon, 
three tablespoons flour, mix all together, add one cup milk 
and the stiffly-beaten whites of the eggs. Bake three-fourths 
of an hour in slow oven using only one crust. 

Mrs. R. V. Buckage, Vincentown, N. J. 
Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



102 



PASTRY AND PIES 



Lemon Pie 

One lemon, one cup sugar, three tablespoons corn starch, two 
eggs, one pint hot water, one tablespoon butter. Dilute corn 
starch in cold water, put sugar, butter and grated rind and 
juice of lemon into a sauce-pan, add corn starch and cook for 
ten minutes; then add the yolks of eggs slightly beaten, cook 
until thickened, cool, pour into pie-shell, beat whites of eggs 
very stiff, add two tablespoons sugar, spread on top of pie 
and brown slightly in cool oven. 

Mrs. Harry W. Tyler, Toano, Va. 

Lemon and Other Tarts 

Line patty-pans with ordinary pastry and put one teaspoon 
of the following mixture into each pan. Mix together 
thoroughly one egg, one cup sugar, one teaspoon melted butter, 
juice of one lemon. Bake in hot oven. A good filling for 
cooked tart-shells is Larkin Prepared Pudding with a spoonful 
of whipped cream on top. Larkin Prepared Jelly Dessert also 
makes a dainty dessert served in the same way. When straw- 
berries are in season crush a few berries, sweeten to taste and 
serve in baked shells with whipped cream. These desserts 
are suitable to use after a heavy meal and also inexpensive. 

Mrs. Annie E. Campbell, (No Address Given) 

Lemon Crumb Pie 

One cup sugar, one cup cold water, one cup fine bread-crumbs 
(or one thick slice of bread), juice and rind of one lemon, two 
eggs, pinch of salt, two tablespoons butter. Cover the bread 
with the water, leave for twenty minutes, add the egg yolks 
slightly beaten, juice and rind of lemon, butter, salt and sugar. 
Mix thoroughly, line a pie-plate with good pastry, pour in the 
filling, bake thirty minutes in hot oven, cover with meringue 
made with whites of two eggs and two tablespoons sugar. I 
have used this recipe for thirty-eight years. 

Mrs. p. C. Brophy, Mountain Grove, Mo. 

Eggless Rhubarb-Lemon Pie 

Stir together one cup stewed rhubarb, two cups boiling water, 
one and one-half cups Larkin Sugar, add eight tablespoons 
Larkin Corn Starch blended with one-half cup cold water. 
Cook over boiling water ten minutes, stir frequently. Add 
three tablespoons butter, one teaspoon Larkin Lemon Flavor- 
ing Extract. Pour into two ready-baked crusts. Serve when 
cold. These are delicious. ^^^^ j ^^^^ Graybill. Buchanan, Va. 

Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



PASTRY AND PIES 



103 



Plain Custard Pie 

Whether for a pie or to bake plain in a dish, allow three eggs 
to every pint of milk with one-third cup of sugar; beat suffi- 
ciently to mix; flavor with one-half teaspoon vanilla or a little 
nutmeg. Bake in slow oven. One-half cup Larkin Shredded 
Cocoanut may be sprinkled over custard if liked. 

Mrs. Wm. Hess, St. Louis, Mo. 

Cream, Banana or Cocoanut Pie 

Cover two deep pie-pans with a rich crust, pinch here and 
there and bake in a hot oven. Mix together one-third cup 
flour with three-fourths cup sugar and a pinch of salt. Add 
one pint scalded milk and three tablespoons butter. Cook 
five minutes, add the beaten yolks of two eggs gradually to 
thickened milk. Cook a few minutes stirring constantly. Set 
aside to cool, add one teaspoon orange extract and fill prepared 
crusts. Make a meringue of the whites of the eggs whipped 
very stiff, and one-fourth cup of sugar, spread on pies and set 
in oven to brown. Delicious. For banana pie add three 
sliced bananas to the mixture. For cocoanut add one-half 
cup Larkin Shredded Cocoanut. 

Mrs. Howard Douglas, Wampum, Pa. 

Eggless Cream Pie 

Mix together three-fourths cup sugar and four tablespoons 
Larkin Corn Starch. Add two cups scalded milk, one table- 
spoon butter. Cook in double-boiler ten minutes, take from 
fire, add one teaspoon Larkin Lemon Flavoring Extract. Pour 
into baked pie-crust and sprinkle top with Larkin Shredded 
ocoanut. Mrs. Thomas H. Runyon, Richmond, Ind. 

Sour Cream Raisin Pie 

Line a pie-tin with rich pie-crust and fill with the following 
mixture: One cup Larkin Raisins chopped, one cup Larkin 
Sugar, yolks of three eggs, one cup sour cream, pinch of salt, 
one teaspoon Larkin Cinnamon. Bake slowly, use the three 
whites for meringue. This makes an excellent pie. 

Mrs. W. R. Steuerwald, Estelline, S. Dak. 

Raisin and Rhubarb Pie 

One cup raisins, one and one-half cups rhubarb cut very small, 
one cup sugar, one-half teaspoon Larkin Salt, one tablespoon 
flour, (rolled cracker may be used instead of flour if preferred), 
one egg. Mix thoroughly and bake in two crusts. 

Mrs. Florence G. Chipman, Attleboro, Mass. 
Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



104 



PASTRY AND PIES 



Red Currant Pie 

Mix together yolks of two eggs, two tablespoons flour, one 
cup sugar, add one cup ripe red currants mashed. Bake in a 
single crimped-edge crust in a shallow pie-pan. When baked 
cover with a meringue made with whites of two eggs stiffly- 
beaten, and two tablespoons granulated sugar. Brown in 
slow oven. ^^^^ j -^y^jjjjgj^ Merrell, Three Rivers, Mass. 

Date Pie 

Cook three-fourths cup dates with two cups milk for twenty 
minutes. Strain, rub through a sieve. Add two beaten eggs 
and one-fourth teaspoon salt and a few grains of nutmeg. Line 
pie-plate with pastry and bake with one crust in the lower 
part of a fairly hot oven. 

Mrs. Robert Paterson, South Paris, Maine. 

Fig Pie 

Put one cup molasses, one cup sugar, the grated rind of one lemon, 
one-half pound Larkin Figs cut fine or put through food-chopper, 
and two cups water, into double-boiler; cook for twenty minutes. 
Thicken with four tablespoons flour, add one beaten egg. Have 
pie-shells baked ready. This is sufficient for two pies. 

Mrs. Pearl Main, Ingersoll, Okla. 

Prune Pie 

Cook one-half pound prunes without sugar, remove stones, 
cut prunes in quarters, and mix with one-half cup sugar. Add 
one tablespoon lemon juice. Cook down the prune juice until 
you have about three tablespoons. Spread pie-pan with pastry, 
cover with prunes, pour over the juice, dot with butter, dredge 
with flour, put on upper crust and bake in hot oven. 

Larkin Kitchen. 

Prune Cream Pie 

Stew gently one-half pound Larkin Prunes which have been 
soaked over night. Stone and mash prunes through a colander. 
Add to the cup of pulp one cup thin cream (or milk). Mix one 
teaspoon Larkin Corn Starch with one-third cup of Larkin 
Granulated Sugar, add the yolks of two well-beaten eggs and 
one teaspoon of Larkin Vanilla. Line a pie-plate with pie- 
crust, fill with mixture and bake quickly. Beat the whites 
of the eggs stiff, add two tablespoons granulated sugar, spread 
over the pie, return the pie to the oven and brown lightly. 
This IS delicious. ^^^^ ^^^^ ^ Sechrist, Blossburg, Pa. 

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PASTRY AND PIES 



105 



Mock Cherry Pie 

One-half cup raisins, one cup cranberries, one-half cup hot 
water, one cup sugar, one tablespoon flour, one teaspoon Larkin 
Vanilla. Pour the hot water over the raisins and cranberries 
and cook till the cranberries burst, then add the sugar and 
flour. Take from the fire, add the vanilla. Bake with two 
crusts. This makes one pie. If you wish, the cranberries 
may be cut open and washed in cold water to remove seeds. 

Mrs. L. O. Cogan, Ravenna, Ohio. 

Pineapple Pie 

Put one cup Larkin Pineapple cut in dice, one cup water or 
pineapple juice and one-half cup sugar into a sauce-pan. Bring 
to a boil, then add two tablespoons corn starch mixed with a 
little cold water, boil until thick and clear. Pour into pre- 
viously-baked crust. When cool cover with whipped cream or 
a one-egg meringue. This makes two small pies. 

Mrs. Fred Cole, Cuba, N. Y. 

Carrot Pie 

Add one cup grated raw carrots, to one cup sweet milk, one 
tablespoon melted butter, one teaspoon Larkin Cinnam.on, one- 
half teaspoon Larkin Ginger, beat together the yolks of two 
eggs and one-half cup sugar. Bake with one crust. Use 
whites of two eggs and little sugar for frosting. 

Miss Anna Faucett, Sonora, N. Y. 

Rice Pie, Belgium Style 

Cook one-half cup Larkin Rice with milk in double-boiler until 
tender, add sugar to taste, take from fire and cool. Now beat 
six eggs until light, flavor with Larkin Vanilla or Lemon, add 
eggs to rice and mix all together. It will be like a thin custard. 
Make a good pie-crust using Larkin Flour and Lard. Fill 
with the rice custard, bake in moderate oven until custard is 
set. This will make three large pies without top crust. 

Mrs. p. F. McGonigal, West Philadelphia, Pa. 

Cocoanut Pie without Crust 

Beat two eggs, add two tablespoons sugar and four tablespoons 
flour smoothed with a little milk. Add the balance of pint 
of milk, one cup Larkin Shredded Cocoanut, one-fourth tea- 
spoon salt, one-half teaspoon vanilla. Put into a pie-pan 
^ and bake in moderate oven. Insert a knife on the side and 
when it is done it will have formed a crust. This is quickly 
made and is very good. ^^^^ j ^ Stephens. Jersey City, N. J. 

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106 



PASTRY AND PIES 



Cocoanut Custard Pie 

One pint milk, one cup Larkin Shredded Cocoanut, one-half cup 
sugar, yolks of three eggs. Beat yolks with sugar and then stir 
in milk and cocoanut, fill crust even full, bake in medium oven. 
Beat whites of eggs to a stiff froth and add three tablespoons 
powdered sugar, spread over pie and bake a light brown. 
Excellent. ^^^ j^^ j g^^^^^ Leipsic, Ohio. 

Butter Scotch Pie 

One cup Larkin Brown Sugar, two eggs, two tablespoons flour, 
one cup cold water, two tablespoons butter, one teaspoon 
Larkin Vanilla. Mix sugar and flour together, add the water 
gradually and stir over the fire until thick. Add the egg yolks 
and butter, then vanilla. Fill baked crust, beat the whites of 
eggs to a stiff froth, add two tablespoons sugar. Put this on 
top and brown in slow oven. 

Mrs. Edgar Gotschall, Jacksonville, III. 

Two-Egg Chocolate Pie 

Melt one ounce Larkin Unsweetened Chocolate in one cup 
boiling water; add one cup granulated sugar and two table- 
spoons Larkin Corn Starch mixed together. Cook ten minutes, 
add beaten yolks of two eggs and two tablespoons butter. 
Flavor with one teaspoon Larkin Vanilla. Make a meringue 
with whites of eggs and sugar, brown daintily. When eggs 
are scarce use double quantity of corn starch and leave out eggs. 

Florence A. Richardson, Topeka, Kans. 

Chess Pie 

Heat one cup milk in a double-boiler, add one-third cup sugar 
and two teaspoons butter. Mix two tablespoons corn starch, 
one-half teaspoon each of cinnamon and allspice with a little 
cold milk. Cook three minutes, then add yolks of two eggs, 
cook two minutes longer and pour into a baked pie-shell. Beat 
the egg whites, add sugar and brown in oven. 

Mrs. E. J. Burke, Neck, Mo. 

Buttermilk Pie 

Mix five tablespoons flour with one-half cup buttermilk until 
smooth. Beat two eggs until mixed, add three-fourths cup 
sugar and four tablespoons butter, add one and one-half cups 
buttermilk, one teaspoon lemon extract. MLx thoroughly. 
Line a large pie-pan with pastry and pour in the custard, bake 
in moderate oven. Larkin Shredded Cocoanut sprinkled over 
the pie gives a pretty finish. ^^^^ ^^ ^^^^^ Galeton. Pa. 

Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



PASTRY AND PIES 



107 



Vinegar Pie 

One egg, three tablespoons Larkin Cider Vinegar, one teaspoon 
Larkin Lemon Flavoring Extract, four tablespoons flour, one 
cup sugar, one cup water. Mix sugar and flour thoroughly 
together, then add boiling water, cook five minutes, add egg 
well beaten, cook in double-boiler two minutes, add lemon and 
vinegar, put into pie-crust which should be already baked. If 
preferred the yolk only may be used in the pie and the white 
for mermgue. ^^^ ^^^^^ Harris, Maxwell, III. 

Mince-Meat 

Two pounds beef from the shoulder, one pound suet, five 
pounds apples, one pound mixed candied peel, three pounds 
raisins, two pounds currants, two and one-half pounds brown 
sugar, two tablespoons Larkin Cinnamon, one tablespoon each 
of cloves, allspice, salt and nutmeg, one quart cider and one pint 
molasses. Cook the beef until tender. When cool put through 
the food-chopper. Also the suet. Peel the apples and chop, 
not too fine (be sure you have five pounds after they are chopped) 
steam the candied peel awhile over hot water, then shave off 
in strips. Pick over the raisins, wash the currants, add the 
sugar and mix all the ingredients together (I always use cider 
that has been boiled down). If it is too stiff you can add more 
molasses. Do not cook but put into glass jars and seal up 
and it is ready for use. This is fine and will keep all through 
the winter months. ^^^^ ^^^^^^ Herington, Kans. 

Old-Fashioned Mince-Meat 

Four pounds beef (boiled), three pounds suet (kidney pre- 
ferred), eight pounds chopped apples, three pounds Larkin 
Currants washed and dried, three pounds Larkin Seeded 
Raisins washed and dried, six pounds Larkin Yellow Sugar, 
two pounds citron cut fine, one cup Larkin Strawberry Jam, 
one cup Larkin Raspberry Jam, the grated rind and juice of 
two oranges and four lemons, four tablespoons Larkin Cinna- 
mon, one tablespoon each Larkin Cloves, mace and Allspice, 
two Larkin Nutmegs grated, two quarts Larkin Grape Juice, 
one pint Larkin Molasses. Cook meat in the least possible 
amount of water, chop very fine. Remove all membrane from 
suet, dredge with Larkin Flour, chop and mix with meat. 
Season with Larkin Salt, add to this all other ingredients; cider 
may be added if desired. This must not be cooked. This 
makes a very large quantity. 

Mrs. D. H. Dager, Lafayette Hill, Pa. 
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108 



PASTRY AND PIES 



Tomato Mince-Meat 

Chop one peck green tomatoes or put them through food- 
chopper using coarse cutter, drain off juice and add as much 
water as there was juice; also add five pounds brown sugar and 
two pounds chopped Larkin Raisins. Cook slowly until the 
tomatoes are tender, then add two tablespoons each of Larkin 
Cloves, Cinnamon, Allspice and Salt; also one cup Larkin 
Vinegar. Boil until thick, stirring frequently, then add six 
large sour apples that have been peeled, cored and chopped. 
When the apples are done the mince-meat is ready for the jars. 
Seal while hot. You will find this very delicious for pies. 

Mrs. J. A. Henry, Strawberry Point, Iowa. 

Mock Mince Pie 

Mix together one and one-half cups Larkin Granulated Sugar, 
one cup Larkin Seeded Raisins chopped, two cups bread- 
crumbs, two cups water, one-half cup Larkin Cider Vinegar 
and one teaspoon each of Larkin Cinnamon, Cloves and All- 
spice. Place on stove and cook until thick. One beaten egg 
may be added if you can spare it. Bake in two crusts. 

Mrs. J. A. Henry, Strawberry Point, Iowa. 

Pumpkin Pie 

Take two cups Larkin Canned Pumpkin, two cups milk, one- 
half cup sugar, one-half teaspoon ginger and nutmeg, one 
teaspoon cinnamon, one-half teaspoon salt and two eggs. Beat 
eggs with sugar and spices, mix all together; bake in moderate 
oven about forty-five minutes. Squash pie is made in exactly 
the same way. j^^^ Viana J. Luchringer, Great Barrington, Mass. 




MEAT AND FISR SAUCES 




Tomato Sauce 

Put one cup Larkin Canned Tomatoes into a sauce-pan with 
one cup water, two whole cloves, four peppercorns, two sprigs 
parsley, one tablespoon chopped onion. Simmer for thirty 
minutes, strain and thicken with three tablespoons butter and 
three tablespoons flour blended together. Add hot stock 
gradually. Cook a few minutes, add pepper and salt to taste. 

Mrs. H. F. Riemer, Detroit, Mich. 

Cranberry Sauce 

One pint water, one pint sugar. Boil five minutes, then add 
one quart cranberries and boil fifteen minutes. Place on back 
of stove for one hour. They are then ready to serve. 

Mrs. Kimball P. Ryan, Chatham Port, Mass. 

Peanut Butter Sauce 

Melt one tablespoon butter and two of Larkin Peanut Butter 
in a small sauce-pan. When softened, add three tablespoons 
flour and two cups milk. Stir until boiling, cook five minutes, 
add half a teaspoon Larkin Salt and a little pepper. This is 
sufficient to serve with two cups boiled macaroni or noodles. 
Delicious with plain, boiled or steamed rice. 

Mrs. T. F. Sargent, Springfield, III. 

Cream Sauce 

Two tablespoons butter, two tablespoons flour, one-half tea- 
spoon salt, a few grains of pepper, one cup milk. Melt the 
butter, stir in the flour and cook until bubbling, add the milk, 
stir constantly over the fire until it reaches the boiling point; 
add the salt and pepper and it is ready for use. 

Larkin Kitchen. 

Apple Sauce 

One pound apples (or four medium size), one-half pint water, 
one-half cup sugar. Quarter and core the apples, do not pare 
them, add the water, cover sauce-pan and bring to the boiling 
point. Press through a colander, add the sugar, then tura 
out to cool. Serve with duck, goose or roasted pork. 

Larkin Kitchen. 



Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



110 



MEAT AND FISH SAUCES 



Egg Sauce 

This is made by adding two hard-boiled eggs, chopped fine, to 
one pint cream sauce. Larkin Kitchen. 

Drawn Butter Sauce 

Make in exactly the same way as cream sauce using water in 
place of milk. With the addition of one tablespoon vinegar, 
this makes a good fish sauce. Larkin Kitchen. 

Caper Sauce 

Make in the same way as drawn butter, adding one tablespoon 
of capers. Serve with boiled mutton. Parkin Kitchen. 





Vanilla Sauce 

Mix one-half cup sugar and one tablespoon corn starch; add 
gradually one cup boiling water, stirring constantly; boil ten 
minutes, remove from fire; add two tablespoons butter and 
one teaspoon vanilla or any other extract. 

Mrs. C. Crane, Des Moines, Iowa. 

Lemon Sauce 

Blend two tablespoons corn starch with one cup sugar, add 
gradually one and one-half cups hot water, stirring constantly. 
Cook ten minutes then add one-fourth cup butter, the beaten 
yolks of two eggs and the grated rind and juice of one lemon. 

Bessie Osborn, Boring, Md. 

Elggless Lemon Sauce 

One-half cup sugar, one cup boiling water, one tablespoon corn 
starch or one and one-half tablespoons flour, two tablespoons 
butter, one and one-half tablespoons lemon juice, few gratings 
of nutmeg. Mix sugar and corn starch, add water gradually, 
stirring constantly; boil ten minutes, remove from fire, add 
butter, lemon juice and nutmeg. If you have no fresh lemons, 
use Larkin Lemon • Flavoring Extract. 

Mrs. Hannah Lloyd, Alloway, N. J. 

Orange Sauce 

Mix together two cups sugar, one egg, two tablespoons cream, 
one tablespoon soft butter and one-half teaspoon orange extract. 
Serve with any plain pudding. 

Miss Elsie A. Bingham, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Custard Sauce 

Beat three eggs slightly, add one-fourth cup sugar and a pinch 

of salt; stir while adding gradually two cups hot milk. Cook 

in double-boiler, continue stirring until mixture thickens and 

a coating is formed on the spoon. Strain immediately; chill 

and add one-half teaspoon Larkin Vanilla or Almond Flavoring 

Extract. When eggs are scarce, use yolk of one egg and two 

tablespoons corn starch. rr r, -n ^t ^r 

^ Edith Ryder, Richmondville, N. Y. 

Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



112 



PUDDING SAUCES 



Foamy Sauce 

Beat whites of two eggs, until light. Add one-half cup sugar 
and beat until stiff. Whip one-half cup thick sweet cream, add 
to sauce with one teaspoon vanilla or any extract. Delicious. 

Mrs. Philip C. Story, Three Rivers, Mass. 

Mock Cream Sauce 

Two tablespoons Larkin Corn Starch, two tablespoons sugar, 
two cups milk, one teaspoon Larkin Vanilla, whites of two 
eggs. Mix corn starch and sugar, add hot milk, cook ten 
minutes, cool. Add vanilla and stififly-beaten whites of eggs. 
Serve with any pudding that requires cream. 

Alicia Nova, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Chocolate Sauce 

Two ounces chocolate, two cups milk, one-half cup sugar, two 
tablespoons corn starch, one teaspoon vanilla. Put milk into 
a double-boiler with the chocolate, stir until smooth and melted, 
moisten the corn starch with a little cold milk; add hot milk, 
cook until smooth and thick; add the sugar; take from the fire 
and add vanilla. Serve with cottage pudding or blanc mange. 

C. M. Small, South Harwich, Mass. 

Hard Sauce 

One-half cup butter, one cup powdered sugar, one-half teaspoon 

lemon and vanilla extract mixed, or a little nutmeg. Cream 

butter, add sugar and extract gradually. Form into a roll 

and slice or serve by the spoonful. t i^ 

•' ^ Larkin Kitchen. 

Fruit Sauce 

To one-pint can of fruit allow one cup whipping cream. Drain 
the fruit and rub through a sieve, whip the cream and fold into 
the pulp; sweeten if necessary. Apricots, strawberries or rasp- 
berries may be used. Delicious with plain layer cake or hot 
b^s^^^ts. Larkin Kitchen. 




PICKLES anM>RESERVES 



^ *!» 



3z: 




Tomato Catsup 

Wash ripe tomatoes. Cut in four pieces and boil until soft. 
Remove from fire and when cool enough to handle strain 
through a coarse sieve. Measure, and to every five quarts of 
juice allow one and one-half pints Larkin Vinegar, one table- 
spoon each Larkin Black Pepper and Cinnamon and two and 
one-half tablespoons Larkin Salt. Mix one-half tablespoon 
Larkin Mustard in two tablespoons cold water; add to other 
ingredients. Put on fire to boil. After boiling one-half hour 
add one and two-thirds cups Larkin Granulated Sugar. Boil 
down to about three-fourths the original quantity. Remove 
and bottle at once. Seal air-tight with Larkin Paraffin Wax. 

Mrs. Florence Hall, Natick, Mass. 

Cooked French Mustard 

Three tablespoons each Larkin Mustard and Sugar. Beat one 
egg light, mix smooth with one cup diluted vinegar, cook a 
few minutes, add one tablespoon butter as you remove from 

St"OV6* 

Mrs. Charles W. Cooley, East Whately, Mass. 

Watermelon Rind Pickle 

Pare off very carefully the green part of the rind of a good ripe 
watermelon, trim off all the red part, cut in pieces two inches 
in length, place in a porcelain-lined or aluminum kettle. To 
each quart of rind use one teaspoon salt, and water to nearly 
cover. Boil until tender enough to pierce with a silver fork, 
or leave in fireless cooker over night. Pour into a colander to 
drain, dry a few pieces at a time by pressing gently in a crash 
towel. Make a syrup allowing one quart best cider vinegar 
to three pounds sugar. Make two small cheese-cloth bags, put 
into each one teaspoon Larkin Cloves and two tablespoons 
Larkin Cinnamon, drop these into the syrup and let it boil 
up, then skim. Put in the melon rind and cook fifteen minutes. 

Fill sterilized jars with the rind, cover with the boiling syrup, 
place spice bag on top and seal tight. 

Miss Carrie E. Pugh, Brownell, Kans. 



Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



114 



PICKLES AND PRESERVES 



Hot Minnesota Pickle 

Take twenty-four large tomatoes, two red peppers, two green 
peppers, four large onions, three heads celery, two cups Larkin 
Vinegar, one tablespoon salt, three-fourths cup granulated 
sugar, one teaspoon Larkin Cinnamon. Put tomatoes, onions, 
celery and peppers through Larkin Food-Chopper using coarse 
cutter. Add the vinegar, sugar and spice and boil for one hour. 
Very good with cold meat. ^^^ j Marasek, Minneapolis. Minn. 

Uncooked Tomato Pickles 

Chop fine one-half peck ripe tomatoes, three heads celery and 
two red peppers with the seeds removed; add one cup brown 
sugar, one-half cup salt, one tablespoon Larkin Black Pepper, 
one teaspoon each ground mace, cloves and cinnamon, two- 
thirds cup black and white mustard seed mixed, one cup grated 
horseradish and one quart vinegar. Mix all well together. 
Put up in jars or bottles. Keep one month before using. 

Elizabeth Maroney, Melrose, Mass. 

Chili Sauce 

Twenty-four red tomatoes, six onions, one and one-half cups 
sugar, one quart vinegar, one tablespoon each Larkin Salt, 
Ginger, Cinnamon and Ground Cloves, one green pepper, a 
little pinch of Larkin Cayenne Pepper and Larkin Mustard. 
Chop up tomatoes and put green peppers and onions through 
Larkin Food-Chopper, add rest of ingredients and boil slowly 
for three or four hours. Put in an air-tight can. Fine with 

"^^^'-' Kathryn Buchanan, Janesville, Wis. 

Bordeaux Sauce 

Four quarts cabbage, two quarts green tomatoes, six large 
onions, two ounces white mustard seed, one-half ounce celery 
seed, one-half ounce tumeric, three red peppers, two pounds 
granulated sugar, eight tablespoons salt, two quarts vinegar. 
Put cabbage, tomatoes and onions through food-chopper; add 
all the ingredients and boil for thirty minutes. Seal while 
hot. This makes five quarts. 

Miss Margaret Creighton, Lonaconing, Md. 

Pepper Relish 

Put twelve green tomatoes, four red bell-peppers and two 
onions through Larkin Food-Chopper, using coarse cutter. 
Add two-thirds cup sugar, two teaspoons Larkin Salt and two 
cups vinegar. Mix well and bottle without cooking. 

Mrs. George W. Quint, Gray, Maine. 



Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



PICKLES AND PRESERVES ns 

Cherry Olives 

Fill a quart jar with nice plump cherries, put one tablespoon 
Larkin Salt on top and fill jar with white- wine vinegar and seal 
up. Do not remove the stones. These are ready for use in 
a few days. This recipe is worth trying. 

Mrs. D. M. Newlan, Hoopeston, III. 

Sweet Pickled Cherries 

Stone and cover any amount of cherries with vinegar. Let 
stand all night. In the morning drain off vinegar, put cherries 
into stone jar and add one pound sugar to every pound of 
cherries. Let stand nine days stirring three to four times 
daily. On the ninth day bottle and seal. 

Mrs. R. V. Buckage, Vincentown, N. J. 

Sweet Pickled Peaches 

Put two pounds Larkin Brown Sugar, one ounce stick cinnamon 
and one pint Larkin Vinegar into a preserving kettle. Cook 
twenty minutes; thinly peel one-half peck peaches and stick 
each peach with several cloves. Put into the syrup and cook 
until soft. Seal while hot. ^^^ ^ Marshall. Chicago, III. 

Corn Salad 

Eighteen ears corn, one head cabbage, four onions, three peppers, 
one and one-half teaspoons ground pepper, one and one-fourth 
pounds brown sugar, one-fourth cup mustard, one-fourth cup 
salt, two quarts good vinegar. Chop corn, cabbage, onions 
and peppers fine, add the other ingredients and cook for fifteen 
minutes after bringing to the boiling point. This recipe makes 
about five and one-half quarts. Seal while hot. 

Mrs. Chris. Christensen, Garner, Iowa. 
Mixed Pickles 

One-half gallon cabbage, one-half gallon cucumbers, one-half 
gallon green beans, one-half gallon small onions, four green 
peppers and two red peppers. Use celery seed, horseradish 
and Larkin Spices to taste. Cook onions and beans tender 
first, then add cucumbers, cabbage, and tomatoes; mix all 
together, cover with vinegar, put on the stove, bring to a boil 

Mrs. J. M. Jinkens, Memphis, Mo. 

Canned Cucumbers 

Wash cucumbers, pack in fruit jars, cover with cold vinegar; 
add one tablespoon salt to each two-quart jar, put rubber on 
and seal tight. ^^^^ ^ g Leach, Brooeland, Ark. 

Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



116 



PICKLES AND PRESERVES 



Ripe Cucumber Pickles 

Cut cucumbers in halves lengthwise. Cover with alum water, 

allowing two teaspoons powdered alum to each quart of water. 

Heat gradually to boiling point; then let stand on back of range 

two hours. Remove from alum water and chill in ice-water. 

Make syrup by boiling five minutes two pounds sugar, one 

pint vinegar with two tablespoons each whole cloves and stick 

■ cinnamon tied in a piece of muslin. Add cucumbers and cook 

ten minutes. Remove cucumbers to a stone jar and pour 

in the syrup. Scald syrup three successive mornings and return 

to cucumbers. at t a c t^ 

Mrs. James A. Sipes, Detroit, Mich. 

Spiced Cucumber Pickles 

To one gallon Larkin Vinegar add one cup each mustard, black 
pepper, salt and sugar. Put into a jar and mix well. Wash 
the cucumbers and wipe dry. Place in the vinegar. This is 
enough for two gallons of cucumbers. They are fine. 

Mrs. Ira Carpenter, Algiers, Ind. 

Olive Oil Pickles 

Cover four quarts sliced cucumbers with boiling hot water 
and when cold drain and cover with a weak brine. Let stand 
over night. In the morning drain. Then add one-half tea- 
spoon each of cloves, allspice and celery seed, two teaspoons 
cinnamon, one-half cup Larkin Olive Oil, one-half cup sugar, 
one-half cup mustard seed, one dozen onions and cold vinegar 
enough to cover thoroughly. Mix well and can. 

Mrs. Chris. Christensen, Garner, Iowa. 

Uncooked Cucumber Relish 

Pare six large fresh cucumbers and chop fine, add one tablespoon 
salt, drain cucumbers in a colander one hour, add three small 
onions chopped fine, one teaspoon Larkin White Pepper, one 
pint white-wine vinegar; stir all well together, put into glass 
jars or bottles, seal air-tight and let stand one month before 

^' C. Elizabeth Davidson, Melrose, Mass. 

Cucumber Mustard Pickles 

Put into a one-quart fruit jar, four tablespoons sugar, two 
tablespoons each salt and ground mustard (dry). Wash 
cucumbers and pack as many as possible into jar. Cucumbers 
should not be more than four inches long. Then fill up jar 
with cold vinegar. Screw up air-tight. After six weeks they 
are ready for the table and are delicious. These will keep 
several years if kept in a cool place. 

Mrs. Geo. Sargent, Brainerd, Minn. 

Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



PICKLES AND PRESERVES 



117 



Mustard Pickles 

One gallon cucumbers, one gallon green tomatoes, one-half 

gallon onions, one-half gallon cabbage. Cut each separately in 

small pieces. Add one-half pint salt to one gallon water ; soak 

over night. Drain and add the following: Three quarts Larkin 

Vinegar, one quart sugar, four tablespoons dry Larkin Mustard, 

one and one-half tablespoons tumeric, one tablespoon Larkin 

Cinnamon moistened with a little vinegar. Cook until tender, 

will keep without sealing. ,., t ^ 

** MRS. John Dreith, Lincoln, Nebr. 

Old Virginia Chow-Chow 

Chop fine eight quarts green tomatoes, three small heads cab- 
bage, six large onions, six ripe peppers, six green peppers. 
Sprinkle with salt, and let stand twenty-four hours; drain 
thoroughly, add three quarts vinegar, one and one-half 
pounds brown sugar. Boil all together one hour, then add : 
Eight quarts ripe tomatoes, three heads finely chopped celery, 
one pint horseradish, boil another fifteen minutes after which 
add: One tablespoon each of cloves and mustard, two table- 
spoons each white mustard seed, allspice and ginger. Mix all 
together thoroughly, put up in jars and seal. Use Larkin 

spices, sugar and vinegar. , „ 

Leonora Page, Amherst, Mass. 

Beet Relish 

Chop one quart cooked beets and one quart raw cabbage, add 
one cup grated horseradish, one cup granulated sugar, one 
tablespoon Larkin Salt, one-half teaspoon Larkin Black Pepper. 
Add only enough vinegar to moisten. 

Mrs. Eliza Gillis, Stanhope, N. J. 




CANNED FRUIT 
AND VEGETABLE 



a 




To Can Fruit 

The important points in canning are to have the fruit in good 
condition, the syrup clear, rightly proportioned and boiling 
hot, the jars hot before putting in the fruit and then filled to 
overflowing. Keep jars in hot water until needed to fill, stand 
them in a pan on a folded cloth with a little hot water in the 
pan. A wide-mouthed funnel is a great aid when doing the 
work. Have the covers for the jars in another dish of hot 
water; dip the rubbers as you place them on the jars. 

To can small fruits it is better to put the fruit into jars, then 
pour over the hot syrup and la)^ on the covers but do not screw 
down. Put some slats of wood into a wash-boiler so that the 
jars will stand steady, stand the jars upon them and pour 
enough warm water into the wash-boiler to come about half 
way up. Let the water boil five minutes, then take out the 
jars and screw tight. Always open fruit some time before 
using; the flavor will be much improved by so doing. 

Amount of Sugar 

One pound of sugar to one pint of water is a good general 
rule to follow. 

To Can Pears 

Allow one-fourth pound of sugar to one pint of water. 

To Can Peaches 

Allow one-half pound of sugar to one pint of water. 

To Can Vegetables 

The success of canning vegetables depends chiefly on absolute 
cleanliness. The jars must have glass or metal covers; do not 
use those with porcelain lining. All vegetables must be freshly 

gathered- Larkin Kitchen. 



Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



CANNED FRUITS AND VEGETABLES . 



19 



To Can Peas, Lima or Shell Beans 

Fill clean jars with freshly-picked peas, fill each jar with water 
that has been boiled and cooled, adjust rubbers, lay on covers 
(do not screw), arrange them in a wash-boiler as directed for 
fruit and boil continuously for two and one-half hours; lift 
each jar and screw tight without removing the cover. This 
rule will answer for lima and other shell beans. 

Larkin Kitchen. 
To Ccin Corn 

Shave corn from the cob, fill jars and press down with a wooden 

spoon. Be quite sure the jar is full. Seal and stand in Larkin 

Steam Cooker No. 140. Steam for three hours. If you have 

no Steam Cooker, place a rack in wash-boiler and surround 

with cold water. If the corn shrinks and you want to fill up 

the jars do so quickly, screw down and steam a few minutes 

longer. Corn canned in this way will keep indefinitely if 

instructions are observed. t^i, r- r- r> kt ^r 

Mrs. C. Crandall, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Canned Snap Beans 

To twelve pints string beans, add one pint salt "with water 
enough to cover beans. Boil until half done. Put into glass 
jars and cover with brine in which beans have been cooked. 

Mrs. John H. Denker, Lakefield, Minn. 

To Can Tomatoes 

Put tomatoes into a wire basket or colander, plunge them into 
boiling water for just a moment, remove skins, cut them in 
half and press out seeds. Put tomatoes into a clean kettle, 
boil for about thirty minutes, stirring frequently. If there 
is much liquid boil a little longer. Then follow instructions 
given for canning fruit. Larkin Kitchen. 





WELLIES,JAMSi 
MARMALAD 



Jtjt£. 




Jellies are made of cooked fruit juice and sugar, in nearly all 
cases the proportions being equal. Where failures occur, they 
may usually be traced to the use of too ripe fruit. 

To Prepare Glasses for Jelly 

Wash glasses and put into a kettle of cold water; place on range 
and heat water gradually to boiling point. Remove glasses 
and drain. Place glasses while filling on a cloth wrung out of 
hot water. 

To Cover Jelly Glasses 

Melt parafifin and cover jelly, then adjust cover. 

To Mcike a Jelly Bag 

Fold two opposite corners of a piece of wool-and-cotton flannel 
about three-fourths yard square. Sew up in form of a cornu- 
copia, rounding at the top. Fell the seam to make more 
secure. Bind the top with tape, and furnish with two or 
three heavy loops by which it may be hung. larkin Kitchen. 

Apple Jelly 

Take twelve good-sized apples, wipe with a clean cloth and 
cut in quarters. Cover with two quarts cold water. Leave 
over night. In the morning stew until the liquid is about half 
cooked away. Then add the juice of two lemons. Boil ten 
minutes. Allow the juice to drip through double cheese-cloth. 
Measure the juice, put an equal quantity of sugar in a granite 
dish in the oven to warm. Stir occasionally. When the juice 
begins to jelly round the edge of the pan, add the sugar, boil 
five minutes, skim and pour into heated jelly glasses. Cover 
and keep in a cold dry place. 

Mrs. W. E. Brooks, Los Molinos, Cal. 

Preserved Cherries 

To a full pint of stoned cherries take one and one-fourth cups 
sugar. Boil twenty minutes and turn out into a crock to cool. 
When cold, put into jars. Boil only one quart of fruit at a time. 

Miss Florence Adrian, Edinburg,?Ill. 



Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



JELUES, JAMS AND MARMALADES 121 

Preservea Figs 

Put ripe figs into a pan. Strew Larkin Soda thickly over the 

figs, cover with boiHng water and stand aside until cool. Make 

a syrup with one pound sugar and one quart water. When the 

figs are cool take from soda-water and cook in syrup until clear. 

Put into jars and seal. ^..^ , t> ^xr xtj t- 

•* Mrs. James R. Wilkerson, Waldo, Fla. 

Strawberry Preserves (Sun-cooked) 

Weigh the strawberries, take as much sugar as fruit, put on 

stove, bring to a boil, have large meat platters ready to put 

fruit on and stand in the sun all day. The sun draws out the 

water and the berries retain their full size. If the sun should 

not shine all day, put out the fruit a second day, then put into 

glass jars. One trial will convince any cook how delicious and 

easy these preserves are. Cherries can be cooked likewise. If 

it is not possible to put the fruit outside in the sun, cook for 

five minutes and then seal, n/i tt u /- i t^ 

Mrs. Frank H. Godar, Louisville, Ky. 

Pineapple and Strawberry Preserve 

To one cup grated pineapple allow two cups strawberries and 
three cups sugar. Boil for twenty minutes, fill jelly glasses; 
seal when cold. ^^^ P L Myer, East St. Louis. III. 

Rhubarb Conserve 

Take six pounds rhubarb cut in small pieces, one pound sun- 
dried figs cut in strips or put through food-chopper, one-half 
pound English walnuts and five pounds sugar. Put the sugar 
over rhubarb, leave over night; in the morning cook until 
thick, then add figs. Cook another thirty minutes, add walnuts, 
coarsely chopped, and remove from fire. Put into jelly glasses 
and, when cold, cover with paraffin. Store in a cool, dark 
place. This is delicious. ^^^ j, ^ ^^^^^^ Salamanca, N. Y. 

Grape Conserve 

Take ten pounds ripe grapes, separate skins from pulp, cook 
pulp separately (just enough to separate seeds), put through 
colander; then cook the pulp, skins and ten pounds of Larkin 
Granulated Sugar together for twenty minutes. Grate the 
rind from four or five oranges, peel off the white pith, add the 
pulp and one pound of cut-up Larkin Seeded Raisins to the 
grapes, cook twenty minutes, then seal tight. Delicious. 

Miss Jean Hauser, Wilkes Barre, Pa. 

Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



122 



JELLIES, JAMS AND MARMALADES 



Plum Conserve 

Use this rule for any fruit. Stew two and one-half quarts 
plums with one and one-half cups water until very soft. Strain 
through a colander, mash with a wooden spoon. Add as much 
granulated sugar as you have pulp. Put through food-chopper 
two oranges, one small lemon, one pound seeded raisins, one- 
half pound walnut meats and one-half pound sun-dried figs. 
Use rind of oranges and lemon as well as pulp. Cook all 
together fifteen minutes, being careful not to burn. This is 
delicious for sandwiches or to serve with Chicken or Turkey. 

Mrs. R. Dubuc, Berlin, N. H. 

Red Currant Conserve 

Pick four pounds of red currants from the stems. Wash and 

put them into a preserving kettle with one pound seeded 

raisins cut in halves, three pounds sugar and four lemons. 

Peel the lemons very thin, remove the white pith and seeds and 

cut in thin slices. Boil to a thick jam. If you like spice, add 

one teaspoon Larkin Cinnamon and one-half teaspoon Larkin 

Cloves 

Clara E. Cooper, Ashland, Mass. 

Orange Marmalade 

Shred one thin-skinned orange and one thin-skinned lemon 
with a paring knife. Put into a New Idea Kettle (No. 210). 
To each measure of shredded fruit take three of water, cover 
and set aside for twenty-four hours. Put on fire and boil 
fifteen minutes. Set aside for another twenty-four hours. 
Measure contents in kettle. To every seven cups of pulp use 
eight cups of Larkin Granulated Sugar (buy sugar in a twenty- 
five pound bag). Boil until it jells which will be in about 
twenty minutes, pour into jelly glasses, cover with paraffin. 
One orange and one lemon with quantities given will make 
seven glasses of marmalade at a cost of less than three cents 

^ * Mrs. Edward Hiebel, Holyoke, Mass. 

Grapefruit Marmalade 

Slice very thin, one orange, one lemon and one grapefruit, 
leaving out the bitter center of grapefruit. Add eight cups 
water and set aside twenty- four hours. Boil twenty minutes 
and set aside another twenty-four hours. Measure and add 
an equal quantity of sugar and boil until it jells. This will 
make one dozen glasses. For a delicious sherbet, add one pint 
of good lemonade to two glasses of marmalade. Freeze. 

Mrs. Charles Walker Schlagel, Des Plaines, III. 

Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



JELLIES, JAMS AND MARMALADES 



123 



Carrot Marmalade 

Scald and rub the skin from a number of carrots. Then put 
the carrots through the food-chopper. To each pint of the 
pulp add the juice and grated rind of one lemon. Put into 
a sauce- pan. For each quart pour over the mixture three and 
one-half cups Larkin Granulated Sugar and let it stand all 
night. In the morning boil until it is clear and appears suffi- 
ciently cooked. Put into jelly glasses. This is a particularly 
delicious marmalade and so economical that almost anyone 

Miss Charlotte Bird, Ann Arbor, Mich. 

Rhubarb Jam 

Wash and cut up without removing the skin, seven pounds 
rhubarb. Put into the kettle with five pounds sugar, one 
pound seeded raisins and two oranges thinly sliced. Cook 
until very thick taking care not to let it burn. Put into glasses 

Pi n ri ^f*^ I 

Mrs. M. Stott, Dormansville, N. Y. 

Pear Chips 

Eight pounds pears, six pounds Larkin Sugar, three lemons, 
one quart cold water, one-eighth pound ginger root. Cut the 
pears fine, grate the lemons and squeeze out the juice. Now 
add the sugar, water and ginger root; cook slowly for three 

Mrs. G. E. Larrabee, Binghamton, N. Y. 

Quince Honey 

Pare and grate five large quinces. To one pint boiling water 
add five pounds sugar. Stir over fire until sugar is dissolved, 
add quince and cook fifteen or twenty minutes. Turn into 
glasses. When cold it should be about the color and consistency 
of honey. ^^^ g ^ ^^^^^^ Fallston, Md. 





Coffee Cleared with Egg 

For six cups of boiled coffee mix three-fourths cup ground 
coffee, one-third of the white of an egg and one-half cup cold 
water in the coffee-pot. Pour over this one quart boiling water, 
stir thoroughly. Boil three minutes. Stir again and stand 
on back of stove, where it will not boil, for ten minutes. Be 
careful to see that the coffee spout is free from grounds before 
pouring. Never boil coffee furiously or the true flavor will be 

Larkin Kitchen. 

Coffee without Egg 

Allow two tablespoons of coffee for each cup. Scald the coffee- 
pot. Pour boiling water on the coffee and boil five minutes. 
Set it back where it will keep hot, but not boil. Add a little 
cold water; pour out a little coffee and pour back again, to 
clear the spout. Or the coffee and cold water may be put 
together in the pot over night and brought to the boiling point 
in the morning. To use a Larkin Percolator is much the best 
and easiest method. Larkin Kitchen. 

Tea 

Scald the teapot and use two teaspoons of tea to each pint of 
boiling water; stir the tea and it is ready to serve. Never use 
a metal pot for tea, as the tannic acid acts on the metal, making 
the tea unwholesome. Larkin Kitchen. 

Cocoa 

Scald three cups milk in a Larkin Double-Boiler. Mix thor- 
oughly three tablespoons Larkin Cocoa with two tablespoons 
sugar, a few grains of salt and add, while stirring constantly, 
one cup boiling water. Boil three minutes and pour into the 
hot milk. Beat several minutes with a wire whisk or egg-beater. 
This is called milling and will prevent a scum from rising. Flavor 
with one-half teaspoon vanilla extract. Use whipped cream or a 
marshmallow in each cup. ^ula Breeden, Haskell. Okla. 



Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



FRUIT JUICES AND BEVERAGES 



125 



Chocolate 

Two ounces Larkin Unsweetened Chocolate, four tablespoons 

sugar, one cup boiling water, few grains of salt, three cups 

milk. Scald milk. Melt chocolate in small sauce-pan placed 

over hot water, add sugar, salt and boiling water gradually, 

when smooth, place on range and boil one minute; add to 

scalded milk, and serve in chocolate cups with whipped cream. 

One and one-half ounces sweet chocolate may be substituted 

for the unsweetened chocolate. Being sweetened, less sugar 

is required. , .. 

^ Larkin Kitchen. 

Grape Juice 

Wash and stem grapes (Concords preferred). Measure, and 
to every four quarts grapes before cooking, add one quart cold 
water. Boil until soft. Remove from fire and when cool 
enough to handle, strain through a coarse cloth twice to extract 
juice. Measure again and to each quart of juice add one cup 
of Larkin Granulated Sugar. Place on fire and boil ten minutes. 
Remove and bottle at once. Seal air-tight with Larkin Paraffin 

Wax 

Mrs. Florence Hall, Natick, Mass. 

Shrub 

Almost any small fruits may be used for this, but raspberries 
are particularly good. Berries that are not nice enough for 
the table or those that are gathered damp may be used for this 
syrup. Allow the berries to ferment, then strain and use one 
cup of sugar to one quart of juice. Boil fifteen minutes, if not 
sufficiently acid, add a little vinegar. Use two teaspoons to a 

^ ■ Mrs. J. S. Mills, South Ashburnham, Mass. 

Fruit Juice and Syrup 

Secure perfectly ripe fruit, cook with about one-fourth as much 
water as you have fruit. Press out the juice and strain as if 
for jelly. Sweeten to taste and boil for twenty minutes in a 
preserving kettle. If for syrup, use equal amounts of sugar 
and juice. Have clean sterilized bottles standing in a pan of 
boiling water and corks that will fit completely down inside 
bottle mouths and one cup of melted Larkin Paraffin Wax. 
Fill each bottle with the boiling juice to within one and one- 
half inches of the top. Press down a heated cork until it touches 
the juice and fill the remaining space above the cork with melted 
paraffin, adding more as it hardens until a complete cap is 
formed around the top of mouth. This will keep for any 
length of time if stored in a cool, dark place. 

Elizabeth Maroney, Melrose, Mass. 
Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



126 FRUIT JUICES AND BEVERAGES 

Lemon Syrup or Fresh Lemonade 

Boil one cup sugar and two cups water twelve minutes, add 
one-third cup lemon juice to syrup. Dilute with ice-water as 
needed. Good for picnics. For fresh lemonade put one tea- 
spoon sugar into a glass; add the juice of one-half lemon. Stir 
until sugar is melted. Fill glass with cold water and it is ready 
to serve. Larkin Kitchen. 

Fruit Punch 

Make one quart strong tea (using Larkin Mixed or Ceylon Tea) 
add sugar to hot tea. Make one-half gallon lemonade with 
six lemons and four oranges. The oranges may be cut in small 
pieces; add one can Larkin Pineapple cut in small pieces, one 
bottle Maraschino cherries, one-half pound Malaga grapes with 
seeds removed; sweeten to taste. This makes about one and 
one-half gallons. Any fruit juice on hand may be used with 
this. Serve very cold. ^^^ ^ ^ ^^^^^^^ S^^^^^^ ^^ 

Club-of-Ten Punch 

Pour one pint of hot water over the grated rind of one lemon 
and one pound of sugar. Boil five minutes. Strain, and while 
still hot, slice into it two medium-sized bananas and three large 
peaches (canned peaches may be used and put in v/hen cold). 
Add a cup of grated pineapple (either fresh or canned), one pint 
of canned cherries, the juice of seven lemons and two oranges. 
Put a large block of ice in the center of the punch-bowl, add two 
quarts of water and let stand two hours in a cool place. At the 
last moment add a few fine strawberries. This will serve 
twenty-five people. ^^^^ ^^^ ^^^^^^ 





Ice-Crccim Candy 

Boil two cups sugar with one-half cup water, one tablespoon 
vinegar, one tablespoon butter. Do not stir the mixture. Boil 
until crisp when tried in cold water; when cooked add one-half 
teaspoon vanilla extract. When cool pull until white, the 
longer you pull the better the candy. 

Miss Evelyn Whitney, Attleboro, Mass. 
Chocolate Cream Candy 

Two cups sugar, two-thirds cup milk, one tablespoon butter, 

two squares chocolate (four tablespoons cocoa may be used 

instead of chocolate), one teaspoon vanilla. Put butter into 

granite sauce-pan; when melted add sugar and milk. Heat 

to boiling point; then add chocolate and stir constantly until 

chocolate is melted. Boil until a little dropped into cold water 

will form a soft ball. Remove from fire, add vanilla, cool and 

beat until creamy and mixture begins to sugar slightly around 

edge of sauce-pan. Pour at once into a buttered pan, cool 

slightly, and mark in squares. One-half cup nuts or raisins 

may be added. iv/r o r. t- tm t 

Mrs. R. Rommel, Elizabeth, N. J. 

Cocoanut Bars 

To one pound or two and one-half cups powdered sugar, use 

the juice of one lemon, white of one egg, and make into a smooth 

ball. Roll into a sheet one-half inch thick, sprinkle thickly 

with Larkin Shredded Cocoanut; put one-half upon the other 

and cut into bars. n* tt 

Mrs. Haefner, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Nut Loaf Candy 

Two pounds granulated sugar, one and one-half cups Larkin 
Corn Syrup, one-half cup boiling water, one-half pound English 
walnut meats, whites of two eggs beaten light. Boil the sugar, 
water and syrup until it hardens when dropped into cold water. 
Pour slowly over the whites of the eggs. Stir in one-fourth 
teaspoon Larkin Vanilla Flavoring Extract and the nuts; beat 
until light. Then pour out and cut into squares. 

Miss Reba Peters, Otterbein, Ind. 



Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



128 



CANDIES 



Candy Baskets 

Take one cup sugar, one-half cup water, a pinch of cream of 
tartar and stir together. Put on stove and boil (do not stir 
after it is on the stove) until it cracks when dropped into cold 
water. When it is almost done it becomes very bubbly. Pour 
it out on a buttered slab and gradually work it into a ball or 
lump, by folding the edges into the center. When cool enough 
to handle, add one-fourth teaspoon Larkin Culinary Paste 
Color moistened with one-half teaspoon Larkin Flavoring 
Extract. Then pull and form into baskets making each a dif- 
ferent shape. Butter the hands occasionally while pulling. 
These quantities will make three small baskets. It is well to 
keep in mind that these extracts and colors go together: When 
wintergreen extract is used, color with red culinary paste. 
When lemon use yellow; when spearmint use green; when 
nutmeg, green and red mixed, using twice as much green as 
red — you will then have gray; when orange use red and yellow; 
when cinnamon use heliotrope; sassafras use very little yellow; 
peppermint use no color. If you do not care to make the 
baskets the recipe is equally good for candies. They may be 
cut in strips or formed into small balls. For a children's party 
the baskets make a delightful decoration or gift especially as 
they are good to eat as well as to look at. 

Mrs. Edward H. Schell, Harrisburg, Pa. 

Fruit Candy 

This is candy you can let the children make. Wash one cup 
each Larkin Figs, Dates and Prunes; add one cup seeded 
raisins and walnut meats. Put all through the food-chopper. 
Mix thoroughly and it is ready to use. Form into small balls, 
dip in melted chocolate and place on waxed paper to dry. 
Cherries, nuts, pieces of candied pineapple may all be used 
for the center; if fillings are used you may then call them Sur- 
prise Balls, others may be dipped in fondant used for making 
candy baskets. This fruit is also delicious as a sandwich 

"'""S- Cecelia Hahn, Wabash, Ind. 

Cream Caramels 

One-half cake or four ounces Larkin Unsweetened Chocolate, 
one pound Larkin Powdered Sugar, one scant cup milk, one- 
half cup butter. Boil these together from five to eight minutes 
or until the mixture scrapes off white from the side of the pan. 
Take from fire, add one teaspoon vanilla and beat hard until 
it thickens, pour into well-greased pan and when nearly cold 
cut m squares. ^^^ Henry M. Buettner, Baltimore, Md. 

Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



CANDIES 



129 



Fondant 

Two and one-half pounds sugar, one and one-half cups boiling 
water, one-fourth teaspoon cream of tartar. Stir ingredients 
together, heat slowly to boiling point; then boil without stirring 
until a soft ball will form when dropped into a little cold water. 
Pour fondant into a shallow pan, flavor with any Larkin Flavor- 
ing Extract, let stand a few minutes to cool but not long enough 
to become hard around the edge; stir with a wooden paddle 
until white and creamy. It will quickly change from this 
consistency and begin to lump, when it should be kneaded with 
the hands until perfectly smooth. 

Put into a bowl, cover with oiled paper and stand aside for 
twenty-four hours if possible. It will then be found easier 
to use. Always make fondant on a clear, dry day. Cream 
Nut Bars, Cream Mints and various candies may all be made 
with this fondant. Shirley M. Shaffer, Oil City, Pa. 

Cocoanut Fudge 

Two cups sugar, two-thirds cup milk, put into a sauce-pan 
and cook over moderate fire until a little dropped into cold 
water will form a soft ball. Remove from fire, add two table- 
spoons butter, cool and add one teaspoon vanilla extract, 
one-half cup shredded cocoanut and one-half cup chopped 
walnuts. Beat all together until the mixture begins to thicken, 
then spread upon buttered tin to thickness of one-half inch. 
Cut into squares. ^^^ George W. Quint, Gray, Maine. 

Peanut Butter Fudge 

Cook together two cups granulated sugar, two tablespoons 
peanut butter and one-half cup milk until it forms a soft ball 
when dropped into cold water. Add one-half teaspoon Larkin 
Vanilla Flavoring Extract, cool and beat until creamy. Pour 
onto a buttered pie-plate and when nearly cold cut in small 
squares. ^^^^ ^ q Caslan, Washington, D. C. 

Pinoche or Divinity 

Take two pounds or four cups Larkin Brown Sugar, one cup 
milk, one-half cup butter, one cup walnuts chopped fine (or any 
other nuts), one-half teaspoon salt. Boil the sugar, milk, butter 
and salt until it forms a soft ball in cold water. Remove from 
stove, add one teaspoon vanilla, cool, add the nuts and beat until 
nearly hard. Pour into buttered pans, mark off in squares when 
cold. For divinity pour the boiling syrup over the stifitly-beaten 
whites of two eggs, add nuts and vanilla and beat until mixture 
will stand alone. ^^^^^ ^ Rommel, Elizabeth, N. J. 

Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



130 



CANDIES 



Sultana Caramels 

Two cups Larkin Sugar, one-half cup milk, one-fourth cup 
molasses, one-half cup butter, two squares Larkin Chocolate, 
one teaspoon vanilla, one-half cup English walnut or hickory 
nut meats cut in pieces, two tablespoons Sultana raisins. Put 
butter and chocolate into a sauce-pan ; when melted, add sugar, 
milk and molasses. Heat to boiling point, and boil seven 
minutes longer. Remove from fire, beat until creamy, add 
nuts, raisins and vanilla; pour at once into a buttered tin. 
Cool slightly and mark in squares. 

Mrs. Frank L. Hinds, Northampton, Mass. 

Larkin Mints 

Put one cup cold water into a sauce-pan, add four cups granu- 
lated sugar and one tablespoon butter. Boil without stirring 
until it forms a soft ball when dropped into cold water. Take 
from fire and cool slightly; add one-half teaspoon each of 
peppermint and apple-green culinary paste. Beat until creamy. 
Drop by teaspoonfuls on waxed paper. Make the same quan- 
tity again and color pink, flavor with Larkin Wintergreen. 
These mints are delicious to serve after a heavy meal or with 
afternoon tea. ^^^ j^^^ McKee, Moriah Center, N. Y. 

Marshmallows 

Take two cups granulated sugar, add six tablespoons water, 
stir over a moderate fire until it boils, then boil without stirring 
until a little dropped into cold water will form a soft ball. 
Have ready two tablespoons Larkin Gelatine soaked in six 
tablespoons cold water about ten minutes. Pour into the 
candy and stir and beat until thick. Flavor with Larkin 
Vanilla or Orange Flavoring Extract; pour into a dish well 
powdered with pulverized sugar and spread to the thickness 
of one inch, sprinkle with the powdered sugar and put in cool 
place over night. Then cut into squares with knife that has 
been dipped in boiling water, dip edges in the sugar and pack 
in boxes lined with Larkin Waxed Paper. 

Miss Annie E. Graybill, Buchanan, Va. 

Children's Rciisin Candy 

One cup powdered sugar, two tablespoons Larkin Cocoa, two 
tablespoons melted butter and enough boiling water to mix 
stiff. Flavor with one-half teaspoon vanilla. Take a little 
of the mixture on the end of a teaspoon and form into a ball, 
taking two raisins to each ball and press together until nearly 
flat. If white candy is preferred leave out cocoa. 

Mrs. p. E. Monroe, South Weymouth, Mass. 

Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



CANDIES 



131 



Vinegar Taffy 

Two cups granulated sugar, one-half cup hot water, two table- 
spoons butter. Place on fire, when it comes to a boil add five 
tablespoons acid vinegar. Boil until brittle when tested in 
cold water. Pour into buttered pan until cool enough to pull. 

Mrs. Henry Davis, New Decatur, Ala. 

Larkin Cocoa Caramels 

One cup Larkin Molasses or Corn Syrup, one cup brown sugar, 
one cup milk, three tablespoons butter, one-half cup cocoa, one 
teaspoon vanilla. Boil sugar, molasses, milk and cocoa until 
it forms a hard ball in cold water. Add butter and vanilla 
when nearly done. Cut when cool. 

Mrs. Henry M. Buettner, Baltimore, Md. 





Ham Sandwich Filling 

One cup or one-half pound chopped ham, enough good vinegar 
to moisten well, one tablespoon Larkin Peanut Butter, a few 
drops of Larkin Celery Flavoring Extract, pepper and salt to 
taste. Mix well and you will have the best ham sandwich 
you ever ate. ^^^ ^ L. Umbarger, Konnarock, Va. 

Cheese Olive Sandwiches 

One-fourth can Larkin Pimentos, one ten-cent cream cheese 
(little snappy), twelve soda crackers, six Larkin Olives, one 
medium-sized onion. Put all these through a Larkin Food- 
Chopper, mix with Larkin Salad Dressing. Season with pepper 
and salt, spread on thin slices of bread with a lettuce leaf 
between. ^^^ ^ g Smith, Fostoria, Ohio. 

Pimento Cheese Sandwiches 

One small can Larkin Pimentos, one pound Larkin Cream 
Cheese, one very small onion, put all through the meat-chopper. 
Mix with boiled salad dressing. Spread between thin slices 
of bread and butter. ^^^ ^^^ ^^^^^^^ p^^^^^^^ I^^^ 

Roquefort Cheese Sandwiches 

One-half pound Roquefort cheese, one cream cheese, one bottle 
Larkin Stuffed Olives, one small onion, one head celery, three 
green peppers, one-half cup butter. Grind all together in 
Larkin Food-Chopper and serve between crackers or sliced 
bread. Half these quantities make enough for a large crowd. 

Mrs. Charles Kelsey, St. Johnsville, N. Y. 

American Cheese Sandwiches 

Cream the yolk of a hard-boiled egg with a tablespoon of 
melted butter, add a little salt, white pepper and mustard 
and one-quarter pound grated cheese; stir in a scant tablespoon 
of vinegar and spread between thin slices of bread with a lettuce 
leaf or cress. ^^^ j^^^ Carper, Franklin, Nebr. 

Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



SANDWICHES 



133 



Larkin Sandwiches 

Put six hard-boiled eggs and six Larkin Sweet Pickles through 
Larkin Food-Chopper. Mix thoroughly, add two tablespoons 
Larkin Peanut Butter, salt and pepper to suit taste. Then add 
Larkin Prepared Mustard and a little vinegar to the consis- 

^ ^ ^* Miss Maude Briles, Fairmount, Ind. 

Scrambled-Egg Sandwiches 

Chip left-over ham and one small onion in small pieces, then 
add it to one well-beaten egg and fry in butter. Salt and 
pepper to taste. This makes a fine sandwich. 

Mrs. Wm. R. Treon, TuRBOTvn.LE, Pa. 

Pork and Bean Sandwiches 

Cut thin slices from a loaf of brown bread, butter and put 
crisp lettuce leaves with a teaspoon of Mayonnaise dressing 
on one slice. On the other spread a layer of pork and beans 
which have been mashed until smooth. Put slices together 
and wrap each sandwich separately in waxed paper. Delicious 
for school or picnic lunches. 

Mrs. Pearl M. Hacker, Council Bluffs, Iowa. 

Peanut Sandwich Filling 

Mix Larkin Peanut Butter with a small amount of Larkin 
Prepared Mustard, add a little cream or Larkin Evaporated 
Milk. The proportions may vary to suit the taste. Spread 
on thinly-sliced graham bread, cut cross-wise and serve on 
lettuce leaves or decorate with parsley or cress. 

Mrs. Eric H. Lindquist, Stromsburg, Nebr. 

Sweet Peanut Sandwiches 

One-half cup grated maple sugar, one-fourth cup finely-chopped 
peanuts, one tablespoon rich sweet milk. Mix well and spread 
between thin slices of graham or plain bread. 

Mrs. a. B. Gracia, New Bedford, Mass. 

Fruit Sandwiches 

One pound each Larkin Dates and English walnuts, three 
tablespoons sweet cream. Put both dates and nuts through 
meat-chopper using the fine knife. Mix until smooth adding 
a tablespoon of cream as needed. Makes about four dozen 
sandwiches and filling will keep a long time in cool weather. 
Used with whole-wheat bread makes delicious sandwiches. 

Mrs. Cliff Harris, Maxwell, III. 

Use Level Measurements Only. See Page 6. 



134 



SANDWICHES 



Sardine Sandwiches 

Take one small can Larkin Sardines, the juice of a small lemon 
and one tablespoon salad dressing. Mix in a bowl with a 
fork; spread on bread or Larkin Soda Crackers. Fine for 
outings or company. ^^^ ^ T. Walsh, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Tomato and Onion Sandwiches 

Cut very firm tomatoes into slices as thin as possible without 
breaking and wafer-like slices of very white onions. Season 
with salt and Larkin Cayenne Pepper, add a dash of Larkin 
Salad Dressing. Put between crisp Larkin Saltines. 

Catherine Nehan, Geneseo, N. Y. 

Fig Filling for Sandwiches 

Chop fine six preserved figs and one-half cup walnuts and mix 
with enough Larkin Raspberry Jam to spread well. Butter thin 
slices of Larkin Brown Bread, spread with the filling and cut the 
slices m quarters. Florence C. Thayer, Stoneham, Mass. 




INDEX 



135 



PAGE 

^merican Cheese Sandwiches 132 

Angel Food 78 

Apple Cake, Dutch 65 

Apple Fritters 24 

Apple Jelly 120 

Apple Pudding 89 

Apple Sauce 109 

Apple Sauce Cake 77 

Apple Tapioca 93 

Apples, Baked 96 



ganana Pie 103 

Banana Salad 46 

Bavarian Cream 95 

Beans, Baked 38-39 

Beans, Canned 119 

Bean Salad 42-43 

Bean Sandwiches 133 

Bean Soup 10 

Beef Broth with Vegetables 9 

Beef Fritters 23 

Beef Loaf 21 

Beef, Minced 30 

Beef, Roast 20 

Beef Steak Pudding, English 21 

Beef with Tomatoes 29 

Beet Relish 117 

Beverages and Fruit Juices. 124 to 126 

Birthday Cake 77 

Biscuits 61-62 

Blackberry Cake 79 

Blanc Mange, Raspberry 95 

Blushing Bunny 57 

Bordeaux Sauce 114 

Boston Cookies 85 

Bread 58-59 

Bread and Rolls 58 to 65 

Bread-Crumb Griddle-Cakes 67 

Brown Betty 94 

Brown Bread 60 

Buckwheat Cakes 67 

Buttermilk Pie 106 

Butter Scotch Pie 105 



(^abbage, Boiled 35 

Cabbage, Filled Leaves 28 

Cabbage Salad 41 

Cabbage. Stuffed 29 

Cakes 69 to 83 

Candie? 127 to 131 

Candy Baskets 128 

Canned Fruits and Vegetables. 118-119 

Caper Sauce 1 10 

Caramel Frosting 82 



, PAGE 

Caramel Pudding 92 

Caramels 128-130-131 

Carrot Marmalade 123 

Carrot Pie 105 

Cheese Balls 56 

Cheese Fingers 57 

Cheese Fondu 56 

Cheese Olive Sandwiches 132 

Cheese Puff 56 

Cheese Straws 101 

Cherries, Preserved 120 

Cherries, Sweet Pickled 115 

Cherry Olives US 

Cherry Salad 45 

Chess Pie 106 

Chicken, Creole Style 27 

Chicken Cutlets 30 

Chicken, Fried 26 

Chicken, Maryland 27 

Chicken Pie 27 

Chicken Pot-Roast with Dumplings.27 

Chicken Salad 43-44 

Chili Con Carni 23 

Chili Sauce 114 

Chocolate 125 

Chocolate Cake 76 

Chocolate Cookies 87 

Chocolate Cream Cake 74 

Chocolate Cream Candy 127 

Chocolate Filling 80 

Chocolate Frosting 80 

Chocolate Mousse 99 

Chocolate Nut Cake 76 

Chocolate Pie 106 

Chocolate Pudding 90 

Chocolate Sauce 112 

Chop Suey, American 23 

Chow-Chow 117 

Chowder 12-13 

Christmas Cake 70 

Christmas Cookies 86 

Clam Chowder 12 

Clam Pie 18 

Clam Soup, Cream of 13 

Clarify Fat, To 7 

Club-of-Ten Punch 126 

Cocoa 124 

Cocoa Angel Cake 78 

Cocoa Caramels 131 

Cocoa Tea Cake 74 

Cocoanut Bars 127 

Cocoanut Frosting 80 

Cocoanut Fudge 129 

Cocoanut Pie 103-105-107 

Cocoanut Pudding 90 

Codfish Balls 15 



136 



INDEX 



PAGE 

Codfish, Creamed 16 

Codfish Fritters 16 

Codfish Loaf 15 

Coffee 124 

Coffee Cake 64-65-74 

Coffee Cornstarch 94 

Coffee Ice-Cream 98 

Combination Salad 41 

Cookies 84 to 87 

Corn, Canned 119 

Corn Chowder 12 

Corn Fritters 35 

Corn-Meal Bread 60 

Corn-Meal Gems 61 

Corn-Meal Griddle-Cakes 67 

Corn Oysters 35 

Corn Pudding 36 

Corn Salad 115 

Corn Soup, Cream of 11 

Cornstarch Cake 73-74 

Cranberry Pudding 91 

Cranberry Sauce 109 

Cream Cake 72 

Cream Caramels 128 

Cream Frosting 82 

Cream Pie 103 

Cream Puffs 72 

Cream Sauce 109 

Creamy Dressing 48 

Croutons 8 

Crumb Cake 79 

Crust Cake 101 

Cucumber Pickles 116 

Cucumber Relish 116 

Cucumbers, Canned 115 

Currant Conserve 122 

Currant Pie 104 

Custard Macaroni 53 

Custard Pie 103 

Custard Sauce Ill 

J)ainty Dessert 96 

Date Cookies 87 

Date and Nut Pudding 91 

Date Pie 104 

Desserts 89 to 99 

Divinity 129 

Doughnuts 88 

Drawn Butter Sauce 110 

Dressings, Poultry and Meat... 27-28 
Dressing, Salad (see Salads.) 
Dumplings 22 

Economical Meat Dish 29 

Egg and Crumb, To 7 

Eggless Cookies 86 

Eggs 50 to 52 

Egg Sauce 110 



PAGE 

pat, To Test, Clarify, Try Out 7 

Fig Filling for Cake 83 

Fig Filling for Sandwiches 134 

Fig Pie 104 

Figs, Preserved 121 

Fillings, Cake 80 to 83 

Fish 14 to 18 

Fish, Baked 15 

Fish, Boiled 14 

Fish, Broiled 14 

Fish Chowder, Imperial 12 

Fish, Fried 14 

Fish, Planked 14 

Foamy Sauce 112 

Fondant 129 

Fourth-of-July Cake 75 

French Dressing 48 

French Pastry 77 

French Toast 66 

Fricasseeing 7 

Fritters, Apple 24 

Fritters, Beef 23 

Fritters, Corn 35 

Frostings and Fillings 80 to 83 

Frozen Desserts 97 to 99 



Fru 
Fru 
Fru 
Fru 
Fru 
Fru 
Fru 
Fru 
Fru 
Fru 
Fru 



t Cake 71 

t Candy 128 

t Cream with Gelatine 98 

t Filling 80 

t Juice and Syrups 125 

t Mousse 99 

t Punch 126 

t Salad. 44-45 

t Sandwiches 133 

t Sauce 112 

ts. Canned 118 



Fudge. 



129 



(^erman Pancakes 68 

Gingerbreads 84 

Gold Cake 73 

Golden Fleece, Southern 57 

Graham Bread 59 

Graham Cookies 85 

Graham Pudding 92 

Grape Conserve 121 

Grapefruit Marmalade 122 

Grape Juice 125 

Griddle-Cakes 66-67 

J^am, Boiled 24 

Ham, To Cure 26 

Ham, Deviled 25 

Ham, Fried 24 

Ham Sandwich Filling 132 

Ham Surprise 31 

Hard Sauce 112 

Hash, Chicken 31 



INDEX 



137 



PAGE 

Hash, "Different" 29 

Hash, Michigan 30 

Hash, Savory 31 

Hermits 86 

Hot Minnesota Pickle 114 

Hot Water Frosting 82 

Jce-Cream and Sherbets 97 to 99 

Ice-Cream Cake 74 

Ice-Cream Cand}' 127 

Icings 81-82-83 

Indian Tapioca 93 

Tarn Cake, English 74 

"^ Jams (see Jellies.) 

Jellies, Jams & Marmalades. 120 to 123 

Jelly Cookies 85 

Jelly Roll 79 

J^arkin Sandwiches 133 

Larkin Special 36 

Layer Cake 71 

Lemonade 126 

Lemon Cheese 101 

Lemon Crumb Pie 102 

Lemon Filling 81 

Lemon Icing 81 

Lemon Pie 102 

Lemon Sauce Ill 

Lemon Sherbet 98 

Lemon Sponge Pie 101 

Lemon Syrup 126 

Lemon Tarts 102 

Lentil Croquettes. 39 

Lentil Soup 9 

Lentil Stew 40 

Lentils, Baked 39 

Loaf, Beef 21 

Loaf, Meat 21 

Loaf, Veal 26 

Lobster Salad 46 

Lobster Wiggle 18 

]yjacaroni & Cheese Dishes. .53 to 57 

Macaroni with Cheese 54 

Macaroni, Custard 53 

Macaroni, English Style 54 

Macaroni, Italian Style 54 

Macaroni with Meat 54 

Macaroni, Nilson 55 

Macaroni and Oysters 55 

Macaroni and Salmon 55 

Macaroni with Sausage 55 

Macaroons 78 

Madeira Cake 79 

Maple Cream Sponge 96 

Maple Icing 83 

Maple Syrup Cream 99 

Marguerites 78 



PAGE 
Marmalades (see Jellies.) 

Marshmallow Dessert 95 

Marshmallow Filling and Frosting. 81 

Marshmallow Pudding 90 

Marshmallows 130 

Marshmallow Salad 44 

Mayonnaise Dressing 48 

Measure, How To 6 

Meat Loaf 21 

Meat Relish 46-47 

Meats and Poultry 19 to 31 

Meat Soups 8 

Melba Filling 82 

Milkless, Eggless, Butterless Cake. 75 

Milk Sherbet 98 

Milk Toast 66 

Mince-Meat 107-108 

Minnehaha Filling 80 

Mints, Larkin 130 

Miscellaneous Salad 43 

Mixed Pickles 115 

Mocha Frosting 81 

Mock Cherry Pie 105 

Mock Cream Sauce 112 

Mock Marshmallow Frosting 81 

Mock Mince Pie 108 

Molasses Cake 73 

Molasses Cookies 85 

Mother's Dressing 49 

Muffins 63-64 

Mustard, Cooked French 113 

Mustard Pickles 116-117 

Mutton Broth 9 

J^ew Idea Ice-Cream 97 

New Orleans Cakes 76 

Nut Bread 61 

Nut Loaf Candy 127 

Qatmeal Bread 60 

Oatmeal Cookies 86 

Olive Oil Pickles 116 

Omelets 50-51 

Onion and Potato Hash 32 

Orange Dessert 95 

Orange Ice-Cream 98 

Orange Icing 82 

Orange Marmalade 122 

Orange Sauce Ill 

Oysters au Gratin 17 

Oysters, Creamed 17 

Oysters, Fried 17 

Oyster Soup 13 

pancakes 68 

Parsnips and Carrots 34 

Pastry and Pies 100 to 108 



138 



INDEX 



PAGE 

Peach Sherbet. 99 

Peaches, Sweet Pickled 115 

Peanut Butter Fudge 129 

Peanut Butter Griddle-Cakes 67 

Peanut Butter Pin- Wheels 101 

Peanut Butter Sauce 109 

Peanut Cookies 87 

Peanut Dressing 48 

Peanut Sandwiches 133 

Peanut Soup, Cream of 11 

Pear Chips 123 

Peas, Baked 34 

Peas, Canned 119 

Peas in Turnip Cups 34 

Pea Soup 9 

Pepper Relish. 114 

Peppers, Spanish 37 

Peppers, Stuffed 38 

Pickles and Preserves 113 to 117 

Pie Crust 100 

Pies 100 to 108 

Pigs in Blankets 17 

Pimento Cheese Sandwiches 132 

Pineapple Filling 83 

Pineapple Pie 105 

Pineapple Salad 45 

Pineapple and Strawberry Preserve. 121 

Pineapple Tapioca 93 

Pinoche 129 

Plum Conserve 122 

Plum Pudding 90-91 

Pop Overs 63 

Pork and Bean Sandwiches 133 

Pork Cake 76 

Pork Chops, Baked 23 

Pork, Roast 23 

Pork, Salt with Gravy 24 

Pork Sausage 25 

Pork Sausage with Tomatoes 25 

Potato Cake 75 

Potato Fritters S3 

Potato Pancakes 68 

Potato Patties 32 

Potato Puffs 33 

Potato Salad 41 

Potato Soup 10-11 

Potatoes au Gratin 32 

Potatoes, Cheese 32 

Potatoes, Escalloped 32 

Potatoes, Stuffed 33 

Potatoes, Walnut Sweet 33 

Poultry 26-27-28 

Pound Cake 72 

Preserves (see Pickles.) 

Prune Jelly 96 

Prune Pie 104 

Puddings 89 to 94 

Pumpkin Pie 108 

Punch 126 



PAGE 

Queen Pudding 89 

^ Quick Soup 9 

Quince Honey 123 

■p abbit en Casserole 28 

Rabbit, Fried 28 

Rabbit, Roast 28 

Raisin Candy 130 

Raisin Cookies 87 

Raisin Filling 81 

Raisin Nut Loaf 61 

Raisin and Rhubarb Pie 103 

Raisin Turnovers 100 

Rarebit, Welsh 56 

Rhubarb Conserve 121 

Rhubarb Jam 123 

Rhubarb-Lemon Pie 102 

Rhubarb Pudding 92 

Rice, Baked 37 

Rice, Boiled 36 

Rice Croquettes 37 

Rice Jelly Sponge 96 

Rice and Meat 30 

Rice and Pimentos 37 

Rice Pie 105 

Rice Pudding 92-93 

Rice, Steamed 37 

Rice, Turkish 30 

Rolls 62 

Roquefort Cheese Sandwiches. . . 132 

Rye and Raspberries 95 

Rye Griddie-Cakes 67 

galad Delight 43 

Salads and Dressings 41 to 49 

Salmagundi . . . , 31 

Salmon Chowder 13 

Salmon Croquettes . 17 

Salmon Loaf 16 

Salmon Salad 44 

Salmon Soufflfe 16 

Sandwiches. 132 to 134 

Sardine Sandwiches 134 

Sauces, (Meat and Fish). ... 109-110 

Sauces, (Pudding) 111-112 

Sauerkraut, Larkin 24 

Sausage Meat.' 25 

Sausage Rolls 25 

Sauteing 7 

Scones 64 

Scrambled Egg Sandwich 133 

Sea Foam Pudding 90 

September Salad 46 

Shad, Baked 15 

Sherbets (see Ice-Cream.) 

Shortcake, Strawberry 94 

Shrimp in Ramekins 18 

Shrub 125 



INDEX 



139 



PAGE 

Slaw 42 

Snow Pudding 92 

Soups 8 to 13 

Sour Cream Raisin Pie 103 

Sour Milk Griddle-Cakes 66 

Southern Spoon Bread 60 

Spice Cake 77 

Spice Cookies 85 

Sponge Cake 73 

Stale Cake Pudding 91 

Steak, Broiled 19 

Steak, Hamburg 20 

Steak, Nut 22 

Steak, Spanish 20 

Steak, Swiss 20 

Stew, Beef 22 

Strawberry Preserve 121 

Strawberry Shortcake 94 

Suet Pudding 89 

Sugar Cookies 87 

Suggestions for Salads 49 

Sultana Caramels 130 

Sweetbreads 26 

'paffy. Vinegar 131 

Tapioca, Apple 93 

Tapioca Cream 94 

Tapioca, Indian 93 

Tapioca, Pineapple 93 

Tapioca Pudding 93 

Tarts 102 

Tea. 124 

Thanksgiving Pudding 91 

Toast and Griddle-Cakes 66 to 68 



PAGE 

Tomato Bouillon 11 

Tomato Cakes 36 

Tomato Catsup 113 

Tomato Mince-Meat 108 

Tomato and Onion Sandwiches. ..134 

Tomato Pickles 114 

Tomato Salad 41-46 

Tomato Sauce 109 

Tomato Soup 11-12 

Tomato and String Bean Salad .... 47 

Tomatoes, Canned 119 

Tomatoes, Fried 36 

Tomatoes and Rice 36 

Try Out Fat, To 7 

Turnips, Boiled 33 

■yanllla Sauce ..Ill 

Veal, Jellied 22 

Veal Loaf 26 

Veal, Roast 26 

Vegetable Chowder 12 

Vegetable Salad 41 

Vegetables 32 to 40 

Vinegar Frosting 83 

Vinegar Pie 107 

Waffles 68 

Watermelon Cake 75 

Watermelon Rind Pickle 113 

Wedding Cake 70 

Weights and Measures 6 

Welsh Rarebit 56 

White Grape Salad 45 



Good Results in Cooking 

Good recipes produce good results only when good materials 
are used. 

Good materials are not necessarily those that cost the most, for 
often you will pay the highest price for materials of inferior grade. 

Many good recipes are often condemned because of the use of 
poor materials. Therefore be sure that the materials you use are 
good quality, that the flavoring extracts or spices are full strength 
and that the utensils used are the proper ones. 

Use Larkin Products 

You will have better results, greater satisfaction and at the 
same time effect a noteworthy saving if you always use Larkin 
Products. 

Pure Foods 

Larkin Pure Foods are of the high- Powder is made of the purest materials, 

est quality, always fresh, full-weight, It combines the highest baking effi- 

clean and wholesome. ciency with excellent keeping properties 

Our Flavoring Extracts are the high- and may always be depended on to 

est concentrations, our Pure Ground g»ve uniform results. Always use 

Spices the fullest strength. Our Maca- Larkm Bakmg Powder, 
roni, Egg Noodles, Corn Starch, Tapi- Larkin Teas are of superior quality, 

oca, Shredded Cocoanut, Gelatine and They offer the opportunity to secure 

Chocolate are articles of exceptional delicious tea at a great saving, 
merit with which delicious dishes can All the other Larkin Pure Foods 

be prepared. are of the same high quality as those 

Quality in Baking Powder is of vital here mentioned. It is wise economy 

importance. On it depends success to keep your pantry well stocked with 

or failure in baking. Larkin Baking these excellent Products. 

Kitchen Cutlery 

Every capable housewife knows ment of high-grade kitchen knives 

how essential it is to have in her kitchen that will give complete and lasting 

well-made cutting implements with satisfaction. 

keen and lasting edges. Larkin House- A Larkin Food -Chopper will add 

hold Cutlery offers a splendid assort- greatly to the eflBciency of the kitchen. 

You Get Extra Value 

Remember, when you buy Larkin Products you get Merchan- 
dise-Bonus which gives you double or almost double value for 
your money. 

Before you buy an article at the store, look through your 
Larkin Catalog — see whether you can buy it as a Larkin Product 
at Factory-to-Family price or get it without extra expense as Larkin 
Premium Merchandise. 



"See First If Larkin Sells It 



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